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Documenting a transfusion: how well is it done?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164478
Source
Transfusion. 2007 Apr;47(4):568-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Gail Rock
Ray Berger
Diane Filion
Donna Touche
Doris Neurath
George Wells
Susie Elsaadany
Mohammed Afzal
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, and the Department of Epidemiology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. cag@ca.inter.net
Source
Transfusion. 2007 Apr;47(4):568-72
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Transfusion - standards - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Documentation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Informed Consent - standards - statistics & numerical data
Medical Records - standards - statistics & numerical data
Quality Assurance, Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Current practice in transfusion medicine promotes clear documentation of transfusion-related events including the fact that the patient has been informed of the related risks and benefits.
A retrospective review of 1005 patient charts was carried out to determine documentation.
Most patients were from general surgery (10.8%) and cardiac surgery (14.1%). In 75 percent of cases the physician had not documented that any discussion had occurred regarding the risks and/or benefits or alternatives. Only 12 percent of charts included information that the patient was subsequently told what blood components were given to them. The discharge summary recorded transfusion information in 32.1 percent of cases whereas the consult note had this information in 26.3 percent. Chart records matched the transfusion medicine records in 60.6 percent of cases. The most common error was in the blood unit identification number.
While accepted in theory, the practice of documenting patient information on transfusion is not well done.
Notes
Comment In: Transfusion. 2007 Apr;47(4):557-817381609
PubMed ID
17381613 View in PubMed
Less detail

Family medicine in post-communist Europe needs a boost. Exploring the position of family medicine in healthcare systems of Central and Eastern Europe and Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126235
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2012;13:15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Marek Oleszczyk
Igor Svab
Bohumil Seifert
Anna Krzton-Królewiecka
Adam Windak
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Chair of Internal Medicine and Gerontology, Jagiellonian University Medical College in Krakow, Krakow, Poland. marek.oleszczyk@gmail.com
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2012;13:15
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
After-Hours Care
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Education, Continuing
Europe, Eastern
Family Practice - education - standards - trends
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Physicians, Family - education - psychology
Quality Assurance, Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Social Control, Formal
Specialization - statistics & numerical data
Workload - psychology
Abstract
The countries of Central and Eastern Europe have experienced a lot of changes at the end of the 20th century, including changes in the health care systems and especially in primary care. The aim of this paper is to systematically assess the position of family medicine in these countries, using the same methodology within all the countries.
A key informants survey in 11 Central and Eastern European countries and Russia using a questionnaire developed on the basis of systematic literature review.
Formally, family medicine is accepted as a specialty in all the countries, although the levels of its implementation vary across the countries and the differences are important. In most countries, solo practice is the most predominant organisational form of family medicine. Family medicine is just one of many medical specialties (e.g. paediatrics and gynaecology) in primary health care. Full introduction of family medicine was successful only in Estonia.
Some of the unification of the systems may have been the result of the EU request for adequate training that has pushed the policies towards higher standards of training for family medicine. The initial enthusiasm of implementing family medicine has decreased because there was no initiative that would support this movement. Internal and external stimuli might be needed to continue transition process.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22409775 View in PubMed
Less detail

Quality of fetal, perinatal and infant autopsy reports. An audit of all reports of postmortem examinations following fetal, perinatal and infant death in Rogaland County, Western Norway, 1997-1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58432
Source
APMIS. 2002 Oct;110(10):746-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
Roger Bjugn
Jannicke Berland
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Central Hospital of Rogaland, Stavanger, Norway. roger.bjugn@pki.uib.no
Source
APMIS. 2002 Oct;110(10):746-52
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autopsy - standards - statistics & numerical data
Death Certificates
Female
Fetal Death - pathology
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Audit - standards - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Pregnancy
Quality Assurance, Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate the quality of fetal, perinatal and infant (
PubMed ID
12583442 View in PubMed
Less detail

Registration rate in the Norwegian Cruciate Ligament Register: large-volume hospitals perform better.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125364
Source
Acta Orthop. 2012 Apr;83(2):174-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Karianne Ytterstad
Lars-Petter Granan
Børge Ytterstad
Kjersti Steindal
Knut Andreas Fjeldsgaard
Ove Furnes
Lars Engebretsen
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian Cruciate Ligament Register, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. karianne.ytterstad@medisin.uio.no
Source
Acta Orthop. 2012 Apr;83(2):174-8
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anterior Cruciate Ligament - surgery
Arthroscopy - classification - methods - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Private - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Public - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Knee Injuries - epidemiology - surgery
Norway - epidemiology
Quality Assurance, Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Registries - standards - statistics & numerical data
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The Norwegian Cruciate Ligament Register (NCLR) was founded in 2004. The purpose of the NCLR is to provide representative and reliable data for future research. In this study we evaluated the development of the registration rate in the NCLR.
The Norwegian Patient Register (NPR) and the electronic patient charts (EPCs) were used as reference data for public and private hospitals, respectively. Data were retrieved for all primary and revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery during 2008-2009 in public hospitals and during 2008 in private hospitals. The NOMESCO classification of surgical procedures was used for identification of ACL surgeries. Public hospitals were divided into subgroups according to the annual number of operations in the NPR: small hospitals (
Notes
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Cites: J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 1998 Aug;28(2):88-969699158
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2011 Feb 4;131(3):248-5021304574
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Nov 3;125(21):2973-416276384
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2005 Dec;76(6):823-816470436
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2006 Feb;77(1):49-5616534702
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 2008 Feb;36(2):308-1517989167
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2005 Mar;58(3):280-515718117
PubMed ID
22489890 View in PubMed
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Renal allograft loss during transition to adult healthcare services among pediatric renal transplant patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150515
Source
Transplantation. 2009 Jun 15;87(11):1733-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2009
Author
Susan M Koshy
Diane Hebert
Kelvin Lam
Therese A Stukel
Astrid Guttmann
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. susan.koshy@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Transplantation. 2009 Jun 15;87(11):1733-6
Date
Jun-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aging - immunology
Child
Cytomegalovirus Infections - epidemiology
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Graft Rejection - immunology - pathology
Graft Survival - immunology
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - surgery
Kidney Transplantation - adverse effects - immunology - pathology - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Pediatrics
Quality Assurance, Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Treatment Failure
Abstract
Transition to adult care occurs at age 18 during a vulnerable adolescent period for pediatric renal transplant (RTx) patients.
We examined renal allograft loss and hospitalization for RTx biopsy or rejection before and after transition to adult care using clinical and administrative health records of children who underwent RTx (1992-2002) in Ontario, Canada. Life-table analyses examined event rates/100 person years according to age at first RTx.
A total of 115 patients were included (57% men; mean age at first transplant 13.9+/-3.7 years). Allograft loss rates were similar across ages 14.0 to 23.9 years. No increase in allograft loss was observed during transition period (ages 18.0-19.9 years). Hospitalizations for RTx rejection or biopsy were much lower after age 18.
Our findings do not support an increased risk of allograft loss after transition to adult care, although there is less hospital use for rejection or biopsy suggesting that differences exist in use of care before complete allograft loss after transition to adult care.
PubMed ID
19502968 View in PubMed
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[The hemolysis index as quality indicator for extra-laboratory part of preanalytical phase].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117370
Source
Klin Lab Diagn. 2012 Nov;(11):63-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
A V Moshkin
Source
Klin Lab Diagn. 2012 Nov;(11):63-4
Date
Nov-2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Specimen Collection - instrumentation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Child
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Hematologic Tests - instrumentation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Hemoglobins - analysis
Hemolysis
Humans
Osmotic Fragility
Quality Assurance, Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Sweden
Abstract
The article considers the new indicator of quality - percentage of samples with hemolysis of free hemoglobin in blood serum lesser than 500 mg/l that corresponds the index of hemolysis lesser than 50 measured using analyzer VITROS 5.1FS (Ortho-clinical diagnostics, USA). The indicator basically is related to quality of implementation of extra-laboratory section of pre-analytical stage of laboratory analysis namely drawing and transportation of blood. This indicator is especially valuable for laboratories charged with organization of samples drawing and transportation at particular territory. The first attempt is made to determine the requirements to quality according this indicator. The optimal level of quality, is the percentage of samples with hemolysis index less than 50 is lower 6.4%. acceptable - 6.4%-8.6%, minimal - 8.7% - 10.9%. The percentage af samples more than 10.9% corresponds to unacceptable level of quality.
PubMed ID
23305024 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.