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160 records – page 1 of 16.

Accreditation: a cultural control strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156493
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur. 2008;21(2):146-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
André Paccioni
Claude Sicotte
François Champagne
Author Affiliation
Centre of Interdisciplinary Research on Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal, Quebec, Canada. andre.paccioni@umontreal.ca
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur. 2008;21(2):146-58
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Humans
Leadership
Longitudinal Studies
Organizational Culture
Patient satisfaction
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration
Quebec
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to describe and understand the effects of the accreditation process on organizational control and quality management practices in two Quebec primary-care health organizations.
A multiple-case longitudinal study was conducted taking a mixed qualitative/quantitative approach. An analytical model was developed of the effects of the accreditation process on the type of organizational control exercised and the quality management practices implemented. The data were collected through group interviews, semi-directed interviews of key informers, non-participant observations, a review of the literature, and structured questionnaires distributed to all the employees working in both institutions.
The accreditation process has fostered the implementation of consultation mechanisms in self-assessment teams. Improving assessments of client satisfaction was identified as a prime objective but, in terms of the values promoted in organizations, accreditation has little effect on the perceptions of employees not directly involved in the process. As long as not all staff members have integrated the basis for accreditation and its outcomes, the accreditation process appears to remain an external, bureaucratic control instrument.
This study provides a theoretical model for understanding organizational changes brought about by accreditation of primary services. Through self-assessment of professional values and standards, accreditation may foster better quality management practices.
PubMed ID
18578200 View in PubMed
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An innovative path to improving cancer care in Indian country.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3934
Source
Public Health Rep. 2001 Sep-Oct;116(5):424-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Burhansstipanov
A. Gilbert
K. LaMarca
L U Krebs
Author Affiliation
Native American Cancer Research, Pine, CO 80470, USA. natamlb@aol.com
Source
Public Health Rep. 2001 Sep-Oct;116(5):424-33
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Female
Focus Groups
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Research
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Neoplasms - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Objectives
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration
Quality of Life - psychology
Self-Help Groups - organization & administration
Social Support
Survivors - psychology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The Native American Cancer Survivors' Support Network is an innovative public health program designed to improve survival from cancer and the quality of life after a cancer diagnosis for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Canadian Aboriginal patients and their loved ones. The Network, initiated in 1999, now has more than 300 survivors enrolled as members. This article briefly describes the process that led to its formation and preliminary findings, primarily for breast cancer survivors, of ongoing qualitative and quantitative research. Network data show patterns of cancer care that are partially responsible for poor survivorship outcomes.
PubMed ID
12042607 View in PubMed
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Assessing discomfort after anaesthesia: should you ask the patient or read the record?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217550
Source
Qual Health Care. 1994 Sep;3(3):137-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
M M Cohen
P G Duncan
D P DeBoer
Author Affiliation
Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, North York, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Care. 1994 Sep;3(3):137-41
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anesthesia - adverse effects - standards
Canada
Female
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Incidence
Male
Medical Records - standards - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Nausea - chemically induced - epidemiology
Patient satisfaction
Postoperative Period
Prospective Studies
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration
Vomiting - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess the quality of anaesthesia care from the patients' viewpoint compared with the hospital record.
Prospective study during 1988-9.
Four teaching hospitals (A-D) in Canada.
15,960 inpatients receiving anaesthetic requiring at least an overnight stay, for whom an interview and review of hospital records within 72 hours of surgery were complete.
Rates of postoperative symptoms of discomfort (nausea or vomiting, headache, back pain, sore throat, eye symptoms, and tingling) according to the hospital record versus interview and the relation between symptoms and patients' satisfaction with the anaesthetic experience.
The preparation of completed interviews ranged from 31.0% to 72.7%, owing mainly to patients discharge (hospitals A and B) and severity of illness (C and D). Interviewed patients were similar to all inpatients in the hospitals but were younger and healthier and more had had effective operations and were general surgical than cardiovascular or neurosurgical patients. In all, 26% to 46% of patients at the four hospitals reported at least one symptom of discomfort. Agreement between interviews and hospital records was low, symptoms being more commonly reported by interview than in the record (for example, headache was reported for 5.8%-17% of patients compared with 0.3%-3.0% in hospital records). After controlling for case mix patients who reported at least one symptom were 2.91 times (95% confidence interval 1.89 to 4.50) more likely to be dissatisfied with their anaesthetic care than patients who did not.
Anaesthesia services are typically neglected in studies of hospital quality, yet patients express considerable anxiety about anaesthetic care. Monitoring and recording patients' discomfort clearly need to be improved if the quality of anaesthesia is to be properly evaluated.
Notes
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Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1986 May;123(5):894-9003962971
Cites: Anaesth Intensive Care. 1985 Aug;13(3):325-94051175
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1982 Jul;116(1):114-227102647
Cites: JAMA. 1988 Nov 18;260(19):2859-633184350
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1989 Feb;129(2):233-482643301
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Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1989;42(12):1207-132585011
Cites: Pain. 1989 Dec;39(3):275-92533340
Cites: Anesth Analg. 1991 Aug;73(2):190-81854034
Cites: Can J Anaesth. 1992 May;39(5 Pt 1):440-81596967
Cites: Can J Anaesth. 1992 May;39(5 Pt 1):430-91596966
Cites: Can J Anaesth. 1992 May;39(5 Pt 1):420-91308755
Cites: Eur J Anaesthesiol. 1991 Jan;8(1):65-81874205
Cites: J Clin Anesth. 1992 Sep-Oct;4(5):355-81389187
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1992 Nov;36(8):767-711466211
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1993 Mar;78(3):417-228457042
Cites: Anesth Analg. 1994 Jan;78(1):7-168267183
PubMed ID
10139410 View in PubMed
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BCLS certification of the nursing staff: an evidence-based approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171587
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 2006 Jan-Mar;21(1):63-9
Publication Type
Article

Bridging the gap: public policy and clinical criteria for competency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222577
Source
Health Law Can. 1993;13(3):177-8, 207
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993

British Columbia: improving retention and recruitment in smaller communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126351
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:37-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Marion Healey-Ogden
Patricia Wejr
Catherine Farrow
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25 Spec No 2012:37-44
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Career Mobility
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Nursing, Continuing - organization & administration
Hospitals, Rural
Humans
Job Satisfaction
National health programs - organization & administration
Nursing Staff, Hospital - supply & distribution
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Personnel Selection - organization & administration
Personnel Turnover
Pilot Projects
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration
Abstract
This pilot project involved the application, in Canada, of the innovative 80/20 staffing model to a hospital in a small rural setting. The model provides the voluntary participants with 20% of their salaried time off from direct patient care in order to pursue various types of professional development activities. The project, overseen by a steering committee, lasted from June 2009 to February 2010 and involved 14 nurses on the pediatric unit of Royal Inland Hospital in Kamloops, British Columbia. It entailed a collaborative partnership of the British Columbia Nurses' Union, Interior Health Authority, Thompson Rivers University and the British Columbia Ministry of Health, and aimed to demonstrate how professional development opportunities can improve recruitment and retention of nurses, quality of work life and quality of patient care.
PubMed ID
22398476 View in PubMed
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160 records – page 1 of 16.