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AACVPR/ACC/AHA 2007 performance measures on cardiac rehabilitation for referral to and delivery of cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention services endorsed by the American College of Chest Physicians, American College of Sports Medicine, American Physical Therapy Association, Canadian Association of Cardiac Rehabilitation, European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, Inter-American Heart Foundation, National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161050
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2007 Oct 2;50(14):1400-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2-2007

[A complex psychological assessment of health care quality of medical personnel and quality of life of four generation of Ukrainians]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90408
Source
Lik Sprava. 2008 Apr-Jun;(3-4):123-35
Publication Type
Article
Author
Rozenbaum M D
Grechenkova L N
Kostenko L S
Grechenkov S V
Source
Lik Sprava. 2008 Apr-Jun;(3-4):123-35
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Clinical Competence
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Moscow
Psychological Tests
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Quality of Life - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Ukraine
Young Adult
Abstract
The article presents experience of the assessment of labour quality and professionalism of medical personnel (physicians and nurses) after the study conducted in 20 medical institutions in Kiev and 20 in Moscow. Expert-points method of assessment was used, correlation analysis of finalized qualifying assessment and social status of staff in each department was the mechanism of check of obtained results. Quality of life of population depends a lot on professionalism of specialists (physicians, teachers, scientists and others). The article presents results of four year (2003-2006) study of quality of life of four generations of Ukrainians aged from 11 to 85 years. Regularity was revealed in different sides of life of four group of responders, including personal, behavioral and psychological aspects.
PubMed ID
19145833 View in PubMed
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Activating knowledge for patient safety practices: a Canadian academic-policy partnership.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129005
Source
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2012 Feb;9(1):49-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Margaret B Harrison
Wendy Nicklin
Marie Owen
Christina Godfrey
Janice McVeety
Val Angus
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. margaret.b.harrison@queensu.ca
Source
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2012 Feb;9(1):49-58
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees - organization & administration - standards
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Evidence-Based Practice - methods - organization & administration - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods - organization & administration - standards
Safety Management - methods - organization & administration - standards
State Medicine - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
Over the past decade, the need for healthcare delivery systems to identify and address patient safety issues has been propelled to the forefront. A Canadian survey, for example, demonstrated patient safety to be a major concern of frontline nurses (Nicklin & McVeety 2002). Three crucial patient safety elements, current knowledge, resources, and context of care have been identified by the World Health Organization (WHO 2009). To develop strategies to respond to the scope and mandate of the WHO report within the Canadian context, a pan-Canadian academic-policy partnership has been established.
This newly formed Pan-Canadian Partnership, the Queen's Joanna Briggs Collaboration for Patient Safety (referred throughout as "QJBC" or "the Partnership"), includes the Queen's University School of Nursing, Accreditation Canada, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI), the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and is supported by an active and committed advisory council representing over 10 national organizations representing all sectors of the health continuum, including patients/families advocacy groups, professional associations, and other bodies. This unique partnership is designed to provide timely, focused support from academia to the front line of patient safety. QJBC has adopted an "integrated knowledge translation" approach to identify and respond to patient safety priorities and to ensure active engagement with stakeholders in producing and using available knowledge. Synthesis of evidence and guideline adaptation methodologies are employed to access quantitative and qualitative evidence relevant to pertinent patient safety questions and subsequently, to respond to issues of feasibility, meaningfulness, appropriateness/acceptability, and effectiveness.
This paper describes the conceptual grounding of the Partnership, its proposed methods, and its plan for action. It is hoped that our journey may provide some guidance to others as they develop patient safety models within their own arenas.
PubMed ID
22151727 View in PubMed
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Advancing measurement of patient safety culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154948
Source
Health Serv Res. 2009 Feb;44(1):205-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Liane Ginsburg
Debra Gilin
Deborah Tregunno
Peter G Norton
Ward Flemons
Mark Fleming
Author Affiliation
School of Health Policy and Management, Faculty of Health, York University, HNES Building 413, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M3J 1P3. lgins@yorku.ca
Source
Health Serv Res. 2009 Feb;44(1):205-24
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Leadership
Medical Errors - prevention & control
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration
Organizational Culture
Psychometrics
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Safety Management - organization & administration
Abstract
To examine the psychometric and unit of analysis/strength of culture issues in patient safety culture (PSC) measurement.
Two cross-sectional surveys of health care staff in 10 Canadian health care organizations totaling 11,586 respondents.
A cross-validation study of a measure of PSC using survey data gathered using the Modified Stanford PSC survey (MSI-2005 and MSI-2006); a within-group agreement analysis of MSI-2006 data. Extraction Methods. Exploratory factor analyses (EFA) of the MSI-05 survey data and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of the MSI-06 survey data; Rwg coefficients of homogeneity were calculated for 37 units and six organizations in the MSI-06 data set to examine within-group agreement.
The CFA did not yield acceptable levels of fit. EFA and reliability analysis of MSI-06 data suggest two reliable dimensions of PSC: Organization leadership for safety (alpha=0.88) and Unit leadership for safety (alpha=0.81). Within-group agreement analysis shows stronger within-unit agreement than within-organization agreement on assessed PSC dimensions.
The field of PSC measurement has not been able to meet strict requirements for sound measurement using conventional approaches of CFA. Additional work is needed to identify and soundly measure key dimensions of PSC. The field would also benefit from further attention to strength of culture/unit of analysis issues.
Notes
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Erratum In: Health Serv Res. 2009 Feb;44(1):321
PubMed ID
18823446 View in PubMed
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Agreement between patients and general practitioners on quality deviations during the cancer diagnostic pathway and associations with time to diagnosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270236
Source
Fam Pract. 2015 Jun;32(3):329-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Henry Jensen
Cecilie Sperling
Mette Sandager
Peter Vedsted
Source
Fam Pract. 2015 Jun;32(3):329-35
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delayed Diagnosis - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Early Detection of Cancer - statistics & numerical data
Female
General Practitioners - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life
Registries
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
High quality and minimal delay are crucial and anticipated elements in the diagnostic cancer pathway as delay in the diagnosis may worsen the prognosis and cause lower patient satisfaction.
The aim of this study was to describe agreement in reported quality deviations (QDs) between general practitioners (GPs) and cancer patients during the diagnostic pathway in primary care and to estimate the association between length of diagnostic interval and level of agreement on reported QDs.
The study was carried out as a Danish cross-sectional study of incident cancer patients identified in the Danish National Patient Registry. Data were collected by independent questionnaires from patients (response rate: 53.0%) and their GPs (response rate: 73.8%), and 2177 pairs of questionnaires were subsequently combined. Agreement between GP- and patient-reported QDs was estimated using Cohen's Kappa, whereas the association between level of agreement and time to diagnosis was estimated using quantile regression.
Patients reported QDs in 29.0% and GPs in 28.5% of the cases, but agreed only slightly on QD presence (Kappas between -0.08 and 0.26). Agreement on 'QD presence' was associated with a 54-day (95%CI: 44-64) longer time to diagnosis than agreement on 'no QD presence'. The association with a longer diagnostic interval was stronger when only GP reported a QD the association than when only patient reported a QD.
Included GPs and patients agreed only slightly on QD presence although they reported the same amount of QDs; this suggests that GPs and patients see QDs as two different concepts. QD presence had a stronger impact on time to diagnosis when reported by the GP (alone or in agreement with the patient) than when reported by the patient alone. The GP may thus be the most important source of information on QD and diagnostic interval, while the patient information tends to underpin this assessment.
PubMed ID
25888583 View in PubMed
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[A method for quality assurance of surgical urologic training. Decentralized registration with centralized statistical processing].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201910
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Apr 5;161(14):2086-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-5-1999

Anaesthetists' perceptions of facilitative weaning strategies from mechanical ventilator in the intensive care unit (ICU): a qualitative interview study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128164
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2012 Jun;28(3):168-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Sara Pettersson
Mariola Melaniuk-Bose
U. Edell-Gustafsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Health, Division of Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2012 Jun;28(3):168-75
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology - manpower - methods
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - statistics & numerical data
Critical Care - manpower - psychology
Decision Making
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - methods
Evidence-Based Practice
Female
Health Services Research
Humans
Intensive Care Units - standards
Learning
Male
Nursing Care - standards
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Qualitative Research
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Social Perception
Social Support
Sweden
Ventilator Weaning - instrumentation - nursing - psychology
Ventilators, Mechanical - standards
Abstract
This study aimed to examine anaesthetists' perceptions of facilitative weaning from the mechanical ventilator in the intensive care unit (ICU).
Explorative qualitative interviews in a phenomenographic reference frame with a purposive sample of 14 eligible anaesthetists from four different ICUs with at least one year of clinical experience of ICU and of ventilator weaning.
Four categories of anaesthetists' perceptions of facilitative decision-making strategies for ventilator weaning were identified. These were the instrumental, the interacting, the process-oriented and the structural strategies" for ventilator weaning. The findings refer to a supportive multidisciplinary holistic ICU quality of care. Choice of strategy for ventilator weaning was flexible and individually tailored to the patients'.
Choice of strategy was flexible and individually adjustable. Introduction of evidence-based guidelines from ventilator weaning is necessary in the ICU. The guidelines should also cover the responsibilities of various professional groups. Regular evaluations of methods and strategies used in practice need to be implemented. This may facilitate decision-making strategies for ventilator weaning in practice at the ICU. Greater attention needs to focus on family members' experiences. The strategies should be an integral part of continuous staff training.
PubMed ID
22227354 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the results of a questionnaire survey among the patients presenting with nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses diseases concerning organization and quality of specialized medical assistance].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275898
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 2016;81(3):23-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
V I Popadyuk
A V Fomina
I A Korshunova
A V Bitsaeva
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 2016;81(3):23-5
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Continuity of Patient Care
Health Services - standards
Humans
Medical Records, Problem-Oriented - statistics & numerical data
Moscow - epidemiology
Nose Diseases - epidemiology - therapy
Otolaryngology - methods - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Paranasal Sinus Diseases - epidemiology - therapy
Patient Preference - statistics & numerical data
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Quality Improvement
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of the medico-social factors on the development of nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses diseases and satisfaction of the patients with the quality of the provided specialized medical assistance. The approaches to the treatment of such patient at the pre-hospital and hospital levels are discussed.
PubMed ID
27367343 View in PubMed
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An educational intervention to enhance nurse leaders' perceptions of patient safety culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173724
Source
Health Serv Res. 2005 Aug;40(4):997-1020
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Liane Ginsburg
Peter G Norton
Ann Casebeer
Steven Lewis
Author Affiliation
School of Health Policy and Management, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Health Serv Res. 2005 Aug;40(4):997-1020
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Inservice training
Leadership
Male
Medical Errors - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration
Organizational Culture
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Regression Analysis
Safety Management - organization & administration
Abstract
To design a training intervention and then test its effect on nurse leaders' perceptions of patient safety culture.
Three hundred and fifty-six nurses in clinical leadership roles (nurse managers and educators/CNSs) in two Canadian multi-site teaching hospitals (study and control).
A prospective evaluation of a patient safety training intervention using a quasi-experimental untreated control group design with pretest and posttest. Nurses in clinical leadership roles in the study group were invited to participate in two patient safety workshops over a 6-month period. Individuals in the study and control groups completed surveys measuring patient safety culture and leadership for improvement prior to training and 4 months following the second workshop.
Individual nurse clinical leaders were the unit of analysis. Exploratory factor analysis of the safety culture items was conducted; repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired t-tests were used to evaluate the effect of the training intervention on perceived safety culture (three factors). Hierarchical regression analyses looked at the influence of demographics, leadership for improvement, and the training intervention on nurse leaders' perceptions of safety culture.
A statistically significant improvement in one of three safety culture measures was shown for the study group (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
16033489 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of pharmacist contribution to an oncology ward in a Swedish hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80594
Source
J Oncol Pharm Pract. 2006 Jun;12(2):75-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Bremberg Eva Rämme
Hising Christina
Nylén Urban
Ehrsson Hans
Eksborg Staffan
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Pharmacy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. eva.bremberg@karolinska.se
Source
J Oncol Pharm Pract. 2006 Jun;12(2):75-81
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Drug Utilization - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - drug therapy
Nurses
Oncology Service, Hospital
Patient care team
Pharmaceutical Preparations - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Pharmacists
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - manpower
Physicians
Professional Role
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
AIM: The aim of this project was to establish the importance of a pharmacist in the health-care team in improving drug use in an oncology ward in the Department of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. METHODS AND PATIENTS: The pharmacist participated in the medical round in the mornings and worked as a member of the health-care team. Drug-related problems (DRPs) were identified by drug chart reviews based on data from medical files, laboratory tests and interviews with patients and/or relatives. A questionnaire to physicians and nurses was used to evaluate their experiences of the pharmacist's contribution to the oncology ward. RESULTS: In total, 114 DRPs were identified in 58 patients. For each DRP, the pharmacist gave proposals for solutions. Sixty-eight suggestions out of 114 (59.6%) were implemented by the physician. Two suggestions (1.8%) were partly followed. For 32 suggestions (28.0%) it was unclear if they had caused any change in medication. Twelve suggestions (10.5%) were not followed. Most of the physicians and nurses acknowledged the pharmacist's contribution to improved drug use in the ward. CONCLUSION: A pharmacist can improve drug use in an oncology ward as a member of the health-care team. The pharmacist contributes with a systematic focus on the patient from a drug perspective.
PubMed ID
16984745 View in PubMed
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202 records – page 1 of 21.