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Aboriginal women caregivers of the elderly

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101089
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2007 Oct-Dec;7(4):796
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-Dec 2007
Author
Crosato, KE
Ward-Griffin, C
Leipert, B
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2007 Oct-Dec;7(4):796
Date
Oct-Dec 2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aboriginal women
Canada
Circles of care
Elderly
Geographically isolated communities (GIC)
Healers
Northern Ontario
Qualitative study
Southern Ontario
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this qualitative study was to develop a comprehensive understanding of Aboriginal women's experiences and perceptions of providing care to the elderly in geographically isolated communities (GIC). Research with Aboriginal women caregivers is essential as the population of Aboriginal elders is increasing, and Aboriginal women represent the majority of caregivers in their communities.METHODS: This study was guided by focused ethnography, which seeks an understanding of a sub-group within a cultural group by uncovering the less obvious expressions and behaviours of the sub-group members. Using one-on-one open-ended interviews and participant observation, 13 women from a number of Aboriginal communities in northern and southern Ontario participated in this study. Data analysis was conducted by reviewing transcripts of interviews to identify codes and themes.RESULTS: Study findings revealed that four concentric circles represent the caring experiences of the Aboriginal women participants: the healers, the family, the Aboriginal community, and the non-Aboriginal community. Cultural values greatly informed participants' perceptions about caring for elderly persons in GIC. These values are represented in five themes: passing on traditions, being chosen to care, supporting the circle of healers, (re)establishing the circles of care, and accepting/refusing external resources.CONCLUSION: The findings from this study have significant implications for healthcare practice and future research.
PubMed ID
17935459 View in PubMed
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Immigrant general practitioners in Norway: A special resource? A qualitative study

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101199
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):239-244
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Diaz, D
Hjörleifsson, S
Author Affiliation
Research Group for General Practice, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):239-244
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross cultural communication
Cultural awareness
Cultural competence
General practice
Immigrant
Norway
Qualitative study
Abstract
AIMS: To explore whether and how immigrant general practitioners (GPs) in two major cities in Norway think that their own ethnic background affects their practices and their work. METHODS: Qualitative focus group and individual interviews with seven immigrant GPs, five men and two women, age 36-65 years. Their clinical experience in Norwegian primary health care ranged from four to 30 years. Analysis was conducted by systematic text condensation. RESULTS: First, immigrant GPs described a gradual process of becoming bicultural: the GPs communicate with immigrant patients on their own terms and draw upon their special knowledge from abroad to help selected patients, while also adapting to Norwegian cultural expectations of the GP's role. Second, the GPs described being aware of cultural issues in consultations with immigrant and Norwegian patients, but rarely making these issues explicit. The GPs ventured that cultural awareness, together with their personal experience in their own countries and as immigrants in Norway, made them able to sometimes help immigrant patients better than Norwegian GPs. Third, immigrant GPs experienced a big workload related to immigrant patients, but they accepted this as a natural part of their work. Fourth, immigrant GPs felt that they had to work harder and be more careful than their Norwegian colleagues in order to avoid complaints from patients, and to be accepted by colleagues. CONCLUSIONS: Immigrant GPs express broad cultural competence and keen cultural awareness in their consultations. The immigrant background of these GPs could be considered as a special resource for clinical practice.
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"Tied together like a woven hat": Protective pathways to Alaska Native sobriety

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9329
Source
Harm Reduction Journal. 2004 Nov 17;1(1):10
Publication Type
Article
Date
11-17-2004
  1 website  
Author
Mohatt, G
Rasmus, SM
Thomas, L
Allen, J
Hazel, K
Hensel, C
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska, Box 757000, Fairbanks, Alaska, 99775-700, USA. ffgvm@uaf.edu.
Source
Harm Reduction Journal. 2004 Nov 17;1(1):10
Date
11-17-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol abuse
Alaska Native culture
People Awakening Project
Protective factors
Qualitative study
Resilience
Sobriety
Triadic influence theory
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The People Awakening Project (1RO1 AA 11446-03) had two purposes, completed in Phase I and Phase II of the project. The purpose of Phase I was to complete a qualitative study; the research objective was discovery oriented with the specific aim of identification of protective and recovery factors in Alaska Native sobriety. Results were used to develop a heuristic model of protective and recovery factors, and measures based on these factors. The research objective of Phase II was to pilot these measures and provide initial validity data. METHODS: Phase I utilized a life history methodology. People Awakening interviewed a convenience sample of 101 Alaska Natives who had either recovered from alcoholism (n = 58) or never had a drinking problem (n = 43). This later group included both lifetime abstainers (LAs) and non-problem drinkers (NPs). Life histories were transcribed and analyzed using grounded theory and consensual data analytic procedures within a participatory action research framework. Analyses were utilized to generate heuristic models of protection and recovery from alcohol abuse among Alaska Natives. RESULTS: Analyses generated a heuristic model of protective factors from alcohol abuse. The resulting multilevel and multi-factorial model describes interactive and reciprocal influences of (a) individual, family, and community characteristics; (b) trauma and the individual and contextual response to trauma, (c) experimental substance use and the person's social environment; and (d) reflective processes associated with a turning point, or a life decision regarding sobriety. The importance of cultural factors mediating all these protective processes is emphasized. For NPs, the resilience process drew from personal stores of self-confidence, self-efficacy, and self-mastery that derived from ability to successfully maneuver within stressful or potentially traumatizing environments. In contrast, for many LAs, efficacy was instead described in more socially embedded terms better understood as communal mastery. One style of mastery is more associated with individualistic orientations, the other with more collectivistic. Future research is needed regarding the generalizeability of this group difference. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that preventative interventions should focus on intervening simultaneously at the community, family, and individual levels to build resilience and protective factors at each level. Of particular importance is the building of reflexivity along with other cognitive processes that allow the individual to think through problems and to reach a life decision to not abuse alcohol.
PubMed ID
15548331 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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