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Competencies in Swedish emergency departments - The practitioners' and managers' perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264150
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2014 Apr;22(2):81-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Henrik Andersson
Birgitta Wireklint Sundström
Kerstin Nilsson
Eva Jakobsson Ung
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2014 Apr;22(2):81-7
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
The task of emergency departments (EDs) is to provide safe emergency healthcare while adopting a caring, cost-effective approach. Patients attending EDs have different medical and caring needs and it is assumed that practitioners have the requisite competencies to meet those needs. The aim of the present study is to explore what kind of competencies practitioners and managers describe as necessary for the practitioners to perform their everyday work in EDs.
This study used a qualitative, exploratory design. Interviews were conducted in two EDs. Data were analysed using inductive content analysis.
The competence focus in everyday work in EDs is on emergency and life-saving actions. There is a polarisation between medical and caring competencies. There is also tension between professional groups in EDs as well as hierarchical boundaries that influence the ability to develop competencies in everyday work. Medical competencies are valued more and caring competencies are subsequently downgraded. A medical approach to competencies consolidates the view of necessary competencies in everyday work in EDs.
The study shows that the competencies that are valued consolidate the prevailing medical paradigm. There is a traditional, one-sided approach to competencies, a hierarchical distinction between professional groups and unclear occupational functions.
PubMed ID
24012407 View in PubMed
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The everyday work at a Swedish emergency department--the practitioners' perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125423
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2012 Apr;20(2):58-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Henrik Andersson
Eva Jakobsson
Carina Furåker
Kerstin Nilsson
Author Affiliation
University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden. henrik.andersson@hb.se
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2012 Apr;20(2):58-68
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Efficiency, Organizational
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Workload
Abstract
In the everyday work at emergency departments (EDs), the patients being cared for have different needs and perceived symptoms. To meet their need for emergency care, knowledge of the work is important. The aim of this study is to explore the everyday work at a Swedish ED from a practitioner's perspective.
This study has a qualitative, exploratory design with observations and interviews at two EDs. Data were analysed by content analysis.
The everyday work is characterised by a rapid, short and standardised encounter with limited scope to provide individualised care, which leads to a mechanical approach. It is also characterised by an adaptive approach in which practitioners strive to be adaptable by structuring everyday work and cooperation to achieve a good workflow.
The study shows that the practitioners' encounter with patients and relatives is rapid and of limited duration. The care activities that practitioners mainly perform comprise standard medical management and are performed more mechanically than in a caring way. The practitioners strive to balance the requirements and the realisation of the everyday work through structures and in cooperation with other practitioners, although they work more in parallel than in integrated teams.
PubMed ID
22483000 View in PubMed
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Experiences from implementing value-based healthcare at a Swedish University Hospital - an longitudinal interview study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285858
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 Feb 28;17(1):169
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2017
Author
Kerstin Nilsson
Fredrik Bååthe
Annette Erichsen Andersson
Ewa Wikström
Mette Sandoff
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 Feb 28;17(1):169
Date
Feb-28-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care
Hospitals, University - economics - organization & administration
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Longitudinal Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pilot Projects
Qualitative Research
Reimbursement Mechanisms
Sweden
Abstract
Implementing the value-based healthcare concept (VBHC) is a growing management trend in Swedish healthcare organizations. The aim of this study is to explore how representatives of four pilot project teams experienced implementing VBHC in a large Swedish University Hospital over a period of 2 years. The project teams started their work in October 2013.
An explorative and qualitative design was used, with interviews as the data collection method. All the participants in the four pilot project teams were individually interviewed three times, with interviews starting in March 2014 and ending in November 2015. All the interviews were transcribed and analyzed using qualitative analysis.
Value for the patients was experienced as the fundamental drive for implementing VBHC. However, multiple understandings of what value for patients' means existed in parallel. The teams received guidance from consultants during the first 3 months. There were pros and cons to the consultant's guidance. This period included intensive work identifying outcome measurements based on patients' and professionals' perspectives, with less interest devoted to measuring costs. The implementation process, which both gave and took energy, developed over time and included interventions. In due course it provided insights to the teams about the complexity of healthcare. The necessity of coordination, cooperation and working together inter-departmentally was critical.
Healthcare organizations implementing VBHC will benefit from emphasizing value for patients, in line with the intrinsic drive in healthcare, as well as managing the process of implementation on the basis of understanding the complexities of healthcare. Paying attention to the patients' voice is a most important concern and is also a key towards increased engagement from physicians and care providers for improvement work.
Notes
Cites: J Intern Med. 2015 Jan;277(1):94-13625174800
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PubMed ID
28241823 View in PubMed
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Experiences of major depression: individuals' perspectives on the ability to understand and handle the illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124817
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2012 May;33(5):272-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Håkan Nunstedt
Kerstin Nilsson
Ingela Skärsäter
Sven Kylén
Author Affiliation
University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Trollhättan, Sweden. hakan.nunstedt@hv.se
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2012 May;33(5):272-9
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Comprehension
Depressive Disorder, Major - psychology - therapy
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
In all social groups, major depression is an increasingly serious problem in modern society. Important aspects of a person's capacity for recovery are the person's own understanding of the illness and the ability to use this understanding to manage the illness. The aim of this study is to describe how individuals with major depression understand their illness and use their understanding to handle it. Twenty participants treated in community care for major depression as determined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders were interviewed between February and June, 2008. Content analysis of the interviews revealed three major themes: (1) awakening insight, (2) strategies for understanding and managing, and (3) making use of understanding, each with additional subthemes. Individual understandings of the illness varied and led to differences in the ways participants were able to handle their depression. In clinical care it is essential to support an individual's understanding of depression and his or her use of that understanding to handle the illness.
PubMed ID
22545633 View in PubMed
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Management of everyday work in Emergency Departments - an exploratory study with Swedish Managers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268575
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2014 Oct;22(4):190-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Henrik Andersson
Birgitta Wireklint Sundström
Kerstin Nilsson
Eva Jakobsson Ung
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2014 Oct;22(4):190-6
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Emergency Service, Hospital - manpower - utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing, Supervisory - utilization
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Workload - economics - psychology
Abstract
Through their formal mandate, position and authority, managers are responsible for managing everyday work in Emergency Departments (EDs) as well as striving for excellence and dealing with the individual needs of practitioners and patients. The aim of the present study is to explore managers' experiences of managing everyday work in Swedish EDs.
A qualitative and exploratory design has been used in this study. Seven managers were interviewed at two EDs. Data was analysed using qualitative content analysis with focus on latent content.
Managers experience everyday work in the ED as lifesaving work. One of the characteristics of their approach to everyday work is their capability for rapidly identifying patients with life-threatening conditions and for treating them accordingly. The practitioners are on stand-by in order to deal with unexpected situations. This implies having to spend time waiting for the physicians' decisions. Management is characterised by a command and control approach. The managers experience difficulties in meeting the expectations of their staff. They strive to be proactive but instead they become reactive since the prevailing medical, bureaucratic and production-orientated systems constrain them.
The managers demonstrate full compliance with the organisational systems. This threatens to reduce their freedom of action and influences the way they perform their managerial duties within and outside the EDs.
PubMed ID
24690575 View in PubMed
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Managing processes of inpatient care and treatment: Swedish healthcare process managers' descriptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280095
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2015;29(7):1029-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Kerstin Nilsson
Mette Sandoff
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2015;29(7):1029-46
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case Management
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Inpatients
Interviews as Topic
Leadership
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to establish a knowledge bank for the development of overall hospital processes. Description and analysis are used to show how process managers experience their situation and the various possibilities it offers for active management in the context of managing processes of inpatient care and treatment at Swedish hospitals.
A qualitative and explorative design with open-ended interviews with 12 process managers at three Swedish hospitals was used. Transcribed interviews were analysed by means of latent content analysis.
The two main categories emerging from the analysis were characteristics of process leadership and prerequisites of process management. Quality, relational and knowledge dimensions, and structure, time and information dimensions emerged as their respective sub-categories. The overall theme describes the interdependence between leadership characteristics and the prerequisites necessary for effective process management.
No generalizations could be made from the results of the qualitative interview studies but a deeper understanding of the phenomenon was reached, which in turn can be transferred to similar settings.
This study contributes qualitative descriptions of leadership characteristics and the prerequisites necessary for active process management in the context of managing processes of inpatient care and treatment at Swedish hospitals, a subject that has not been investigated earlier.
PubMed ID
26556166 View in PubMed
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The need to succeed - learning experiences resulting from the implementation of value-based healthcare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296901
Source
Leadersh Health Serv (Bradf Engl). 2018 02 05; 31(1):2-16
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
02-05-2018
Author
Kerstin Nilsson
Fredrik Bååthe
Annette Erichsen Andersson
Mette Sandoff
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health and Caring Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv (Bradf Engl). 2018 02 05; 31(1):2-16
Date
02-05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Female
Hospital Administration
Hospitals, University
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Leadership
Male
Middle Aged
Problem-Based Learning
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Value-Based Purchasing
Abstract
Purpose The aim of this study has been to explore learning experiences from the two first years of the implementation of value-based healthcare (VBHC) at a large Swedish University Hospital. Design/methodology/approach An explorative design was used in this study. Individual open-ended interviews were carried out with 19 members from four teams implementing VBHC. Qualitative analysis was used to analyse the verbatim transcripts of the interviews. Findings Three main themes pinpointing learning experiences emerged through the analysis: resource allocation to support implementation, anchoring to create engagement and dedicated, development-oriented leadership with power of decision. Resource allocation included the need to set aside time and administrative resources and also the need to adjust essential IT-systems. The work of anchoring to create engagement involved both patients and staff and was found to be a never-ending task calling for deep commitment. The hospital top management's explicit decision to implement VBHC facilitated the implementation process, but the team leaders' lack of explicit management mandate was experienced as obstructing the process. The development process contributed not only to single-loop learning but also to double-loop learning. Originality/value Learning experiences drawn from implementing VBHC have not been studied before, and thus the results of this study could be of importance to managers and administrators wanting to implement this concept in their respective organizations.
PubMed ID
29412094 View in PubMed
Less detail

Primary healthcare in transition--a qualitative study of how managers perceived a system change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106898
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2013;13:382
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Andy Maun
Kerstin Nilsson
Carina Furåker
Jörgen Thorn
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 414, 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden. andy.maun@gu.se.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2013;13:382
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Care Reform - economics - organization & administration
Health Facility Administrators
Health Priorities - organization & administration
Healthcare Financing
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Organizational Innovation - economics
Primary Health Care - economics - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
Primary healthcare in Sweden has undergone widespread reforms in recent years, including freedom of choice regarding provider, freedom of establishment and increased privatisation. The key aims of the reforms were to strengthen the role of the patient and improve performance in terms of access and responsiveness. The aim of this study was to explore how managers at publicly owned primary healthcare centres perceived the transition of the primary healthcare system and the impact it has had on their work.
In this qualitative study, 24 managers of publicly owned primary healthcare centres in the metropolitan region of Gothenburg were recruited. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and data were analysed using content analysis inspired by Silverman.
The analysis revealed two core themes: The transition is perceived as a rapid change, enforced mainly through financial incentives and Prioritisation conflicts arise between patient groups with different needs, demands and levels of empowerment. The transition has produced powerful and rapid effects that were considered to be both positive and negative. While the new financial incentives were seen as a driving force and a tool for change, they also became a stress factor due to uncertainty, competition with other primary healthcare centres and negative feelings associated with staff cutbacks. The shift in power towards the patient improved access and service but also led to more patients with unreasonable demands. Managers found it difficult to prioritise correctly between patient groups with different needs, demands and levels of empowerment and they were concerned about potentially negative effects on less empowered patients, e.g. multi-morbid patients. Managers also experienced shortcomings in their change management skills.
This qualitative study shows the complexity of the system change and describes the different effects and perceptions of the transition from a manager's perspective. This suggests a need for improved follow-up and control in order to monitor and govern system changes and ensure development towards a more effective and sustainable primary healthcare system.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24090138 View in PubMed
Less detail

Swedish social insurance officers' experiences of difficulties in assessing applications for disability pensions--an interview study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162777
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007;7:128
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Berit Ydreborg
Kerstin Ekberg
Kerstin Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Public Health, Orebro County Council, Orebro Sweden. berit.ydreborg@orebroll.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007;7:128
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - psychology
Adult
Certification - organization & administration - standards
Communication
Decision Making, Organizational
Government Agencies - organization & administration
Humans
Insurance, Disability - organization & administration
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Operations Research
Problem Solving
Qualitative Research
Social Security - organization & administration - standards
Social Welfare - economics
Sweden
Time Factors
Work Capacity Evaluation
Workload
Abstract
In this study the focus is on social insurance officers judging applications for disability pensions. The number of applications for disability pension increased during the late 1990s, which has resulted in an increasing number of disability pensions in Sweden. A more restrictive attitude towards the clients has however evolved, as societal costs have increased and governmental guidelines now focus on reducing costs. As a consequence, the quantitative and qualitative demands on social insurance officers when handling applications for disability pensions may have increased. The aim of this study was therefore to describe the social insurance officers' experiences of assessing applications for disability pensions after the government's introduction of stricter regulations.
Qualitative methodology was employed and a total of ten social insurance officers representing different experiences and ages were chosen. Open-ended interviews were performed with the ten social insurance officers. Data was analysed with inductive content analysis.
Three themes could be identified as problematic in the social insurance officers' descriptions of dealing with the applications in order to reach a decision on whether the issue qualified applicants for a disability pension or not: 1. Clients are heterogeneous. 2. Ineffective and time consuming waiting for medical certificates impede the decision process. 3. Perspectives on the issue of work capacity differed among different stakeholders. The backgrounds of the clients differ considerably, leading to variation in the quality and content of applications. Social insurance officers had to make rapid decisions within a limited time frame, based on limited information, mainly on the basis of medical certificates that were often insufficient to judge work capacity. The role as coordinating actor with other stakeholders in the welfare system was perceived as frustrating, since different stakeholders have different goals and demands. The social insurance officers experience lack of control over the decision process, as regulations and other stakeholders restrict their work.
A picture emerges of difficulties due to disharmonized systems, stakeholder-bound goals causing some clients to fall between two stools, or leading to unnecessary waiting times, which may limit the clients' ability to take an active part in a constructive process. Increased communication with physicians about how to elaborate the medical certificates might improve the quality of certificates and thereby reduce the clients waiting time.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17597536 View in PubMed
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