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3166 records – page 1 of 317.

6-month CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - a case study from the couple's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165224
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):103-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Anders Broström
Peter Johansson
Jan Albers
Jan Wiberg
Eva Svanborg
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. andbr@imv.liu.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):103-12
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure - adverse effects - psychology
Cost of Illness
Fear
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Frustration
Humans
Male
Nursing Methodology Research
Obesity, Morbid - complications
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Snoring - etiology - psychology
Social Behavior
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - etiology - psychology
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is independently associated with an increased risk for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) can reduce mortality and morbidity, but low compliance rates are seen.
To explore and describe the experiences of CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe OSAS during a 6-month period from the couple's perspective. METHODS AND THE CASE: A single case study with a phenomenographic approach was employed. Diagnostic procedures of OSAS and initiation of treatment with Auto-CPAP, humidifier and a nasal mask were performed during 4 visits. Conceptions were collected at 4 different occasions during the 6-month period (before, and 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment initiation) by means of interviews with a 33-year old male patient and his female partner.
Totally 17 different structural aspects were found to fluctuate during the 6-month period in relation to; influence of stressors, social reactions and adaptation to increase compliance.
An increased knowledge about the influence of stressors, the social reactions, and the adaptation can help healthcare personnel to identify and better understand concerns of other patients and spouses during different time phases of the initial 6-month period of CPAP-treatment.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):89-9018396463
PubMed ID
17291832 View in PubMed
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The 'ability' paradigm in vocational rehabilitation: challenges in an Ontario injured worker retraining program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131610
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2012 Mar;22(1):105-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
E. MacEachen
A. Kosny
S. Ferrier
K. Lippel
C. Neilson
R L Franche
D. Pugliese
Author Affiliation
Institute for Work & Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. emaceachen@iwh.on.ca
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2012 Mar;22(1):105-17
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Employment
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Ontario
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Rehabilitation, Vocational - economics - methods
Workers' Compensation - organization & administration
Abstract
In recent years, a focus on workers' ability, rather than impairment, has guided disability management services. However, a challenge with the notion of 'ability' is identification of the border between ability and inability. This article considers this gray zone of disability management in the case of a workers' compensation vocational retraining program for injured workers in Ontario.
In-depth interviews and focus groups were conducted with a purposive sample of 71 participants who were directly involved with the vocational retraining process. Workers in the program had on average incurred injury 3 years earlier. Procedural and legal documents were also analyzed. Principles of grounded theory and discourse analysis guided the data gathering and analysis.
A program focus on worker abilities did not allow for consideration of unresolved medical problems. Concepts such as maximum medical rehabilitation distracted attention from workers' ongoing chronic and unstable health situations, and incentive levers to employers directed some of the least capable workers into the program. As well, communication pathways for discussing health problems were limited by rules and provider reluctance to reveal problems. Therefore, workers completing the program were deemed 'employable', while ongoing and problematic health conditions preventing employment remained relatively uncharted and invisible.
This study reinforces how the shift in disability management paradigm to a focus on ability and return to work requires consideration of environmental conditions, including policies and programs and implementation. A focus on the environment in which worker ability can be enacted might be as important as a focus on improving individual worker characteristics.
PubMed ID
21894535 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal experiences of aging and dementia in a context of sociocultural change: qualitative analysis of key informant group interviews with Aboriginal seniors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137393
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2011 Mar;26(1):103-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Shawnda Lanting
Margaret Crossley
Debra Morgan
Allison Cammer
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Saskatchewan, Arts Building, 9 Campus Drive, S7N 5A5 Saskatoon, SK, Canada. shawnda.lanting@usask.ca
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2011 Mar;26(1):103-17
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - ethnology - psychology
Cultural Evolution
Dementia - ethnology - psychology
Family
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Neuropsychological Tests
Qualitative Research
Saskatchewan
Abstract
Examining the role of culture and cultural perceptions of aging and dementia in the recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of age-related cognitive impairment remains an understudied area of clinical neuropsychology. This paper describes a qualitative study based on a series of key informant group interviews with an Aboriginal Grandmothers Group in the province of Saskatchewan. Thematic analysis was employed in an exploration of Aboriginal perceptions of normal aging and dementia and an investigation of issues related to the development of culturally appropriate assessment techniques. Three related themes were identified that highlighted Aboriginal experiences of aging, caregiving, and dementia within the healthcare system: (1) cognitive and behavioural changes were perceived as a normal expectation of the aging process and a circular conception of the lifespan was identified, with aging seen as going back "back to the baby stage", (2) a "big change in culture" was linked by Grandmothers to Aboriginal health, illness (including dementia), and changes in the normal aging process, and (3) the importance of culturally grounded healthcare both related to review of assessment tools, but also within the context of a more general discussion of experiences with the healthcare system. Themes of sociocultural changes leading to lifestyle changes and disruption of the family unit and community caregiving practices, and viewing memory loss and behavioural changes as a normal part of the aging process were consistent with previous work with ethnic minorities. This research points to the need to understand Aboriginal perceptions of aging and dementia in informing appropriate assessment and treatment of age-related cognitive impairment and dementia in Aboriginal seniors.
PubMed ID
21287400 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal urbanization and rights in Canada: examining implications for health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115712
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Aug;91:219-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Laura C Senese
Kathi Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography & Program in Planning, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street, Room 5047, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G3, Canada. laura.senese@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Aug;91:219-28
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health Status Disparities
Human Rights
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Prejudice - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Urban Health - ethnology
Urbanization
Young Adult
Abstract
Urbanization among Indigenous peoples is growing globally. This has implications for the assertion of Indigenous rights in urban areas, as rights are largely tied to land bases that generally lie outside of urban areas. Through their impacts on the broader social determinants of health, the links between Indigenous rights and urbanization may be related to health. Focusing on a Canadian example, this study explores relationships between Indigenous rights and urbanization, and the ways in which they are implicated in the health of urban Indigenous peoples living in Toronto, Canada. In-depth interviews focused on conceptions of and access to Aboriginal rights in the city, and perceived links with health, were conduced with 36 Aboriginal people who had moved to Toronto from a rural/reserve area. Participants conceived of Aboriginal rights largely as the rights to specific services/benefits and to respect for Aboriginal cultures/identities. There was a widespread perception among participants that these rights are not respected in Canada, and that this is heightened when living in an urban area. Disrespect for Aboriginal rights was perceived to negatively impact health by way of social determinants of health (e.g., psychosocial health impacts of discrimination experienced in Toronto). The paper discusses the results in the context of policy implications and future areas of research.
PubMed ID
23474122 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal women caregivers of the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160837
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2007 Oct-Dec;7(4):796
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kay E Crosato
Catherine Ward-Griffin
Beverly Leipert
Author Affiliation
The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. Kay.Crosato@halton.ca
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2007 Oct-Dec;7(4):796
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthropology, Cultural - methods
Caregivers
Community-Institutional Relations
Culture
Empathy
Female
Geriatric Nursing
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Middle Aged
Ontario
Qualitative Research
Rural Population
Social Values
Abstract
The purpose of this qualitative study was to develop a comprehensive understanding of Aboriginal women's experiences and perceptions of providing care to the elderly in geographically isolated communities (GIC). Research with Aboriginal women caregivers is essential as the population of Aboriginal elders is increasing, and Aboriginal women represent the majority of caregivers in their communities.
This study was guided by focused ethnography, which seeks an understanding of a sub-group within a cultural group by uncovering the less obvious expressions and behaviours of the sub-group members. Using one-on-one open-ended interviews and participant observation, 13 women from a number of Aboriginal communities in northern and southern Ontario participated in this study. Data analysis was conducted by reviewing transcripts of interviews to identify codes and themes.
Study findings revealed that four concentric circles represent the caring experiences of the Aboriginal women participants: the healers, the family, the Aboriginal community, and the non-Aboriginal community. Cultural values greatly informed participants' perceptions about caring for elderly persons in GIC. These values are represented in five themes: passing on traditions, being chosen to care, supporting the circle of healers, (re)establishing the circles of care, and accepting/refusing external resources.
The findings from this study have significant implications for healthcare practice and future research.
PubMed ID
17935459 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal youth suicide in Quebec: the contribution of public policy for prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108699
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Sep-Dec;36(5-6):399-405
Publication Type
Article
Author
Michel Tousignant
Livia Vitenti
Nathalie Morin
Author Affiliation
CRISE, University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada. Electronic address: tousignant.michel@uqam.ca.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Sep-Dec;36(5-6):399-405
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Crime
Databases, Factual
Female
Housing
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Public Policy
Qualitative Research
Quebec - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - ethnology - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The high rate of youth suicide in some First Nations villages of Northern Quebec is an important public health problem. Based on a six-year field study in three villages belonging to the Atikamekw and Anishinabe groups, this paper proposes changes in three areas of social policy that could contribute to prevention of youth suicide. These three areas are: youth protection, administration of justice, and housing. An argument is made first to adapt the youth protection law of Quebec and to give greater responsibility to communities in individual cases in order to prevent child placement outside the villages. Regarding the administration of justice, we suggest initiatives to encourage rapid prosecution of crimes on reserves and the adoption of an approach based on reconciliation between perpetrator and victim. Finally, we indicate how housing measures could help safeguard children's wellbeing given that overcrowding can contribute to suicide. The discussion also proposes that these three key changes in social policy could be relevant in other Aboriginal communities both within and outside of Quebec.
PubMed ID
23856179 View in PubMed
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Abortion ethics--women's post abortion assessments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64698
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1994 Jul;73(6):492-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
K. Holmgren
N. Uddenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1994 Jul;73(6):492-6
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude
Ethics
Female
Guilt
Humans
Interviews
Maternal-Fetal Relations
Moral Development
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Qualitative Research
Research
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Shame
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND. Induced abortion is often discussed in terms of ethics. The aim of the present report is to describe the abortion ethics as it was expressed by women undergoing a legal abortion. OBJECTIVE. Moral considerations expressed during semistructured interviews by 128 women two weeks after a first trimester abortion in Stockholm 1987-90 are reported. RESULT. The women had faced a choice between abortion and parenthood. At the time of the abortion many of them were living under conditions that meant they were unable to offer a child the security they regarded as a child's right. The conflict the women spontaneously described as their main moral dilemma was not a conflict between the woman and the fetus, but a conflict between several close relationships, also concerning the prospective father. The ethics that the women applied to the problems of abortion was founded on a long-term responsibility to care for persons in their relationships. CONCLUSION. The women interviewed had three levels of moral reasoning simultaneously present. 1. A theoretical level--most of all concerning other women--a liberal view of rights: abortion should be a freely obtainable option. 2. A theoretical level--above all, concerning themselves--a restrictive deontological view: the extinction of life is morally wrong and should be avoided. 3. A practical level--when the problem was a reality: a consequentialist ethics of care. According to this ethics of care it was important that the abortion could be performed as early as possible during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
8042463 View in PubMed
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Absence from work due to occupational and non-occupational accidents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118455
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Feb;41(1):18-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Kirsten Jørgensen
Bjarne Laursen
Author Affiliation
Department of Management Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark. kirj@man.dtu.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Feb;41(1):18-24
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate absence from work in Denmark due to occupational and non-occupational accidents.
Since the beginning of the last decade, political focus has been placed on the population's working capacity and the scope of absence due to illness. Absence from work is estimated at between 3% and 6% of working hours in the EU and costs are estimated at approximately 2.5% of GNP.
Victims of accidents treated at two emergency departments were interviewed regarding absence for the injured, the family and others. All answers were linked to the hospital information on the injury, so that it was possible to examine the relation between absence and injury type, and cause of the accident.
In total, 1,479 injured persons were interviewed. 36% of these reported absence from work by themselves or others. In mean, an injury caused 3.21 days of absence. Based on this the total absence due to injuries in Denmark was estimated to 1,822,000 workdays, corresponding to approximately 6% of the total absence from work due to all types of illness. Non-occupational injuries resulted in more absence than did occupational injuries.
Absence due to accidents contributed to a considerable part of the total absence from work, and non-occupational accidents caused more absence than did occupational accidents.
PubMed ID
23208299 View in PubMed
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Academic learning for specialist nurses: a grounded theory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266326
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2014 Nov;14(6):714-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Lena German Millberg
Linda Berg
Elisabeth Björk Brämberg
Gun Nordström
Joakim Ohlén
Source
Nurse Educ Pract. 2014 Nov;14(6):714-21
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Education, Nursing, Graduate
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Learning
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Educational
Nurse Clinicians - education
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim was to explore the major concerns of specialist nurses pertaining to academic learning during their education and initial professional career. Specialist nursing education changed in tandem with the European educational reform in 2007. At the same time, greater demands were made on the healthcare services to provide evidence-based and safe patient-care. These changes have influenced specialist nursing programmes and consequently the profession. Grounded Theory guided the study. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire with open-ended questions distributed at the end of specialist nursing programmes in 2009 and 2010. Five universities were included. Further, individual, pair and group interviews were used to collect data from 12 specialist nurses, 5-14 months after graduation. A major concern for specialist nurses was that academic learning should be "meaningful" for their professional future. The specialist nurses' "meaningful academic learning process" was characterised by an ambivalence of partly believing in and partly being hesitant about the significance of academic learning and partly receiving but also lacking support. Specialist nurses were influenced by factors in two areas: curriculum and healthcare context. They felt that the outcome of contribution to professional confidence was critical in making academic learning meaningful.
PubMed ID
25240945 View in PubMed
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"A call for a clear assignment" - A focus group study of the ambulance service in Sweden, as experienced by present and former employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292617
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2018 01; 36:1-6
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2018
Author
Helena Rosén
Johan Persson
Andreas Rantala
Lina Behm
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, SE 221 00 Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: helena.rosen@med.lu.se.
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2018 01; 36:1-6
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulances - manpower
Attitude of Health Personnel
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Emergency Medical Technicians - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Workplace - psychology - standards
Abstract
The aim was to explore the ambulance service as experienced by present and former employees.
Over the last decade, the number of ambulance assignments has increased annually by about 10%, and as many as 50% of all ambulance assignments are considered non-urgent. This raises questions about which assignments the Ambulance Service (AS) is supposed to deal with.
Data were collected from three focus group interviews with a total of 18 present and former employees of the Swedish AS. An inductive qualitative analysis method developed by Krueger was chosen.
Five themes emerged in the analysis: "Poor guidance for practice", "An unclear assignment", "Being a gate keeper", "From saving lives to self-care" and "Working in no man's land", which together constitute the AS.
Present and former employees of the AS in Sweden describe their mission as unclear and recognize the lack of consensus and a clearly developed mission statement. Furthermore, expectations and training mainly focus on emergency response, which is contrary to the reality of the ambulance clinicians' everyday work.
PubMed ID
28712766 View in PubMed
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3166 records – page 1 of 317.