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3168 records – page 1 of 317.

How do older people experience their management of medicines?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272419
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Mar;17(5A):106-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Margareta Westerbotn
Elin Fahlström
Johan Fastbom
Hedda Agüero-Torres
Pernilla Hillerås
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Mar;17(5A):106-15
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe how older people living at home in Stockholm, Sweden, experienced the management of their own medication regimen from their own perspective.
Very old people tend to use more medicines, and without proper medication, many of them would not function well and would not be able to remain in their own homes.
This qualitative study involved audiotaped interviews with 25 very old persons.
aged >or=85 years, mini-mental state examination >or=24, living at home, taking medicines regularly. Data collected May-June 2005, analysed using content analysis.
Descriptive study.
Findings revealed that most participants managed their medicines by themselves and were very content with this. Older people who received some help with their medicines were also very pleased with that help. The most important components for older people were to have good cognitive ability, to be independent and to get support with their medicines from a close person as a back up.
Our results indicate that most of the participants were very pleased with their medicine management, either on their own or they were able to get some help. There was, however, a need for assistance in delivering the medicines to their homes.
Understanding how older people experience their management of medicines and to reveal the components which may affect them in this situation is important to improve nursing care. To observe the life of an older person as a whole is important in nursing care, so that the person's behaviour can be understood, as how older people manage to handle their medicines may have an impact on their autonomy and on health-care resource use.
PubMed ID
18298761 View in PubMed
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After methods, the story: from incongruity to truth in qualitative research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181181
Source
Qual Health Res. 2004 Mar;14(3):430-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Arthur W Frank
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2004 Mar;14(3):430-40
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Humans
Narration
Qualitative Research
Writing
Abstract
Writing is the integral part of research when a story is crafted. This story makes whatever claim the research will have on readers, and social scientists have increasingly recognized the need to take their storytelling seriously. Discussion of several contemporary ethnographies offers practical advice on writing by asking how the authors tell such good stories. Advice begins with how to catch readers' attention and moves to issues of telling the truth in postmodern times.
PubMed ID
15011908 View in PubMed
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Holding the patient's life in my hands: Swedish registered nurse anaesthetists' perspective of advocacy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264343
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2014 Jun;28(2):281-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Ann-Sofie Sundqvist
Agneta Anderzén Carlsson
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2014 Jun;28(2):281-8
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Nurse Anesthetists - psychology
Patient Advocacy
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
Anaesthesia often induces a state of unconsciousness that includes inability to communicate and influence the situation. The patient has to rely on the nurse anaesthetist to speak up for her/him as well as maintain her/his dignity and safety. Consequently, the nurse anaesthetist can be likened to the patient's advocate.
The aim of the study was to describe advocacy in anaesthesia care during the perioperative phase from the perspective of the registered nurse anaesthetist.
Data for this qualitative descriptive study were collected during March and April, 2011. Individual interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 20 nurse anaesthetists from two hospitals in Sweden. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed by means of qualitative content analysis.
The main theme, Holding the patient's life in my hands, described the nurse anaesthetists' perception of advocacy and comprised three subthemes: providing dignified care, providing safe care and a moral commitment.
Acting as the patient's advocate includes important health and well-being issues and could be stressful for the nurse anaesthetists'. A work environment where the nurse anaesthetists' can make their voices heard and feel that their opinion regarding the patient's best interests is taken seriously would be desirable, as all health professionals should ideally focus on those in their care.
PubMed ID
23713584 View in PubMed
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Providing Palliative Care in a Swedish Support Home for People Who Are Homeless.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290915
Source
Qual Health Res. 2016 Jul; 26(9):1252-62
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Cecilia Håkanson
Jonas Sandberg
Mirjam Ekstedt
Elisabeth Kenne Sarenmalm
Mats Christiansen
Joakim Öhlén
Author Affiliation
Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden cecilia.hakanson@esh.se.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2016 Jul; 26(9):1252-62
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Communication
Homeless Persons
Humans
Palliative Care
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
Despite high frequencies of multiple, life-limiting conditions relating to palliative care needs, people who are homeless are one of the most underserved and rarely encountered groups in palliative care settings. Instead, they often die in care places where palliative competence is not available. In this qualitative single-case study, we explored the conditions and practices of palliative care from the perspective of staff at a Swedish support home for homeless people. Interpretive description guided the research process, and data were generated from repeated reflective conversations with staff in groups, individually, and in pairs. The findings disclose a person-centered approach to palliative care, grounded in the understanding of the person's health/illness and health literacy, and how this is related to and determinant on life as a homeless individual. Four patterns shape this approach: building trustful and family-like relationships, re-dignifying the person, re-considering communication about illness and dying, and re-defining flexible and pragmatic care solutions.
PubMed ID
25994318 View in PubMed
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Source
Qual Health Res. 2003 Feb;13(2):256-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Juliet M Corbin
Author Affiliation
International Institute for Qualitative Research, University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2003 Feb;13(2):256-67
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chronic Disease
Health
Human Body
Humans
Qualitative Research
Abstract
In this keynote address, the author discusses perception of the body in the context of chronic illness compared with that of health. She describes changes that occur in illness with respect to time, space, morality, aesthetics, morality, technology, information, and interpersonal relationships using examples from her research, and explores the construction of illness and health identities.
PubMed ID
12643032 View in PubMed
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Nurses' perceptions of climate and environmental issues: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272072
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2015 Aug;71(8):1883-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Anna Anåker
Maria Nilsson
Åsa Holmner
Marie Elf
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2015 Aug;71(8):1883-91
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate change
Humans
Nursing Staff - psychology
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore nurses' perceptions of climate and environmental issues and examine how nurses perceive their role in contributing to the process of sustainable development.
Climate change and its implications for human health represent an increasingly important issue for the healthcare sector. According to the International Council of Nurses Code of Ethics, nurses have a responsibility to be involved and support climate change mitigation and adaptation to protect human health.
This is a descriptive, explorative qualitative study.
Nurses (n = 18) were recruited from hospitals, primary care and emergency medical services; eight participated in semi-structured, in-depth individual interviews and 10 participated in two focus groups. Data were collected from April-October 2013 in Sweden; interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis.
Two main themes were identified from the interviews: (i) an incongruence between climate and environmental issues and nurses' daily work; and (ii) public health work is regarded as a health co-benefit of climate change mitigation. While being green is not the primary task in a lifesaving, hectic and economically challenging context, nurses' perceived their profession as entailing responsibility, opportunities and a sense of individual commitment to influence the environment in a positive direction.
This study argues there is a need for increased awareness of issues and methods that are crucial for the healthcare sector to respond to climate change. Efforts to develop interventions should explore how nurses should be able to contribute to the healthcare sector's preparedness for and contributions to sustainable development.
PubMed ID
25810044 View in PubMed
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Children's perceptions of injuries: a qualitative study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105816
Source
Pediatr Nurs. 2013 Sep-Oct;39(5):225-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
Richard Allan Dale
Marie Hasselberg
Annika Jakobsson
Gunnel Hensing
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Pediatr Nurs. 2013 Sep-Oct;39(5):225-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Humans
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Wounds and Injuries - psychology
Abstract
To understand one of the major public health problems for children, it is important to consider the children's perspective. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore, describe, and categorize children's perceptions of injury severity and children's explanations of the injuries they experience. A total of 29 students from six randomly selected schools were interviewed in age groups of 9, 13, and 17 years. Manifest content analysis according to Graneheim and Lundman (2004) was used to categorize children's own statements. Need of medical attention, long-term consequences, and familiarity with the injury risk situation were identified as important determinants of children's perception of injury severity. Three categories emerged from children's explanations of their injuries: "Because of Me" (beliefs, lack of concentration, health conditions, and lack of awareness of risk), "Because of the Situation" (rain, ice, wind, animals, inanimate objects, constructions, and the children's games), and "Just Inexplicable" to the children. Findings suggest that children have a wide perception of injury severity and that children's beliefs of injury causation, as well as children's familiarity with injury risk situations, need to be considered in future studies focusing on the development of childhood injury prevention strategies. Additionally, results suggest that sometimes children cannot or do not want to explain their injuries.
PubMed ID
24308087 View in PubMed
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Exploring the material basis for health: characteristics of parks in Montreal neighborhoods with contrasting health outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168522
Source
Health Place. 2006 Dec;12(4):361-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Stephanie E Coen
Nancy A Ross
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, McGill University, 805 Sherbrooke St. West, Montréal, QC, Canada H3A 2K6.
Source
Health Place. 2006 Dec;12(4):361-71
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Public Health
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Recreation
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
The growing evidence of neighborhood influences on health points to the need for investigation of health-relevant features of local environments. This study examines one potentially health-enhancing neighborhood resource, urban parks, to test for systematic differences in material conditions between areas. Twenty-eight parks selected from six urban Montreal neighborhoods along a health status gradient are qualitatively assessed. While neighborhood parks showed a variety of feature quality ratings, those located in poor health areas displayed several pronounced material disadvantages, including concentration of physical incivilities, limited provision of facilities for physical exercise, and adjacency to industrial sites and multi-lane roads. Equalizing park quality between areas may be an important step for public health promotion.
PubMed ID
16814195 View in PubMed
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From challenges to advanced practice registered nursing role development: Qualitative interview study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280740
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2015 Dec;21(6):896-903
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Krista Jokiniemi
Kaisa Haatainen
Anna-Maija Pietilä
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2015 Dec;21(6):896-903
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advanced Practice Nursing
Finland
Humans
Nurse's Role
Qualitative Research
Abstract
The aim of this study is to describe the factors hindering and facilitating the implementation of the advanced practice registered nurses role at Finnish university hospitals, and to examine the implications for its future development. A descriptive qualitative approach, using thematic individual interviews, was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 11 advanced practice registered nurses. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The advanced practice registered nurses role barriers had an impact on the role development needs. In turn, the facilitating factors helped encounter the challenges of the role, therefore having an impact on both the current role achievement, as well as contributing to the future role development. The factors hindering and facilitating the advanced practice registered nurses role need to be acknowledged to support the role implementation and planning of the future of the role.
PubMed ID
24754703 View in PubMed
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Institutional logic in self-management support: coexistence and diversity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291235
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2016 11; 24(6):e191-e200
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2016
Author
Dagmara Bossy
Ingrid Ruud Knutsen
Anne Rogers
Christina Foss
Author Affiliation
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Learning and Mastery in Health NKLMH, Universitetssykehus HF, Aker Sykehus, Oslo, Norway. dagmara.bossy@medisin.uio.no.
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2016 11; 24(6):e191-e200
Date
11-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Chronic Disease - therapy
Humans
Logic
Norway
Qualitative Research
Self-Management
Abstract
The prevalence of chronic conditions in Europe has been the subject of health-political reforms that have increasingly targeted collaboration between public, private and voluntary organisations for the purpose of supporting self-management of long-term diseases. The international literature describes collaboration across sectors as challenging, which implies that their respective logics are conflicting or incompatible. In line with the European context, recent Norwegian health policy advocates inter-sectorial partnerships. The aim of this policy is to create networks supporting better self-management for people with chronic conditions. The purpose of our qualitative study was to map different understandings of self-management support in private for-profit, volunteer and public organisations. These organisations are seen as potential self-management support networks for individuals with chronic conditions in Norway. From December 2012 to April 2013, we conducted 50 semi-structured interviews with representatives from relevant health and well-being organisations in different parts of Norway. According to the theoretical framework of institutional logic, representatives' statements are embedded with organisational understandings. In the analysis, we systematically assessed the representatives' different understandings of self-management support. The institutional logic we identified revealed traits of organisational historical backgrounds, and transitions in understanding. We found that the merging of individualism and fellowship in contemporary health policy generates different types of logic in different organisational contexts. The private for-profit organisations were concerned with the logic of a healthy appearance and mindset, whereas the private non-profit organisations emphasised fellowship and moral responsibility. Finally, the public, illness-oriented organisations tended to highlight individual conditions for illness management. Different types of logic may attract different users, and simultaneously, a diversity of logic types may challenge collaboration at the user's expense. Moral implications embed institutional logic implying a change towards individual responsibility for disease. Policy makers ought to consider complexities of logic in order to tailor the different needs of users.
PubMed ID
26429669 View in PubMed
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3168 records – page 1 of 317.