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[Central metabolism in Acinetobacter sp. grown on ethanol]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9620
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2003 Jul-Aug;72(4):459-65
Publication Type
Article
Author
T P Pirog
Iu V Kuz'minskaia
Author Affiliation
Zabolotnyi Institute of Microbiology and Virology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, ul. Zabolotnogo 154, Kiev, 03143 Ukraine.
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2003 Jul-Aug;72(4):459-65
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acinetobacter - genetics - growth & development - metabolism
Carboxy-Lyases - metabolism
Citric Acid Cycle
Culture Media
English Abstract
Enzyme Activation
Ethanol - metabolism
Fumarate Hydratase - metabolism
Fumarates
Gluconeogenesis
Glutamate Dehydrogenase - metabolism
Isocitrate Dehydrogenase - metabolism
Isocitrate Lyase - metabolism
Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex - metabolism
Malate Dehydrogenase - metabolism
Malate Synthase - metabolism
Mutation
Phosphoenolpyruvate - metabolism
Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (ATP) - metabolism
Phosphotransferases (Paired Acceptors) - metabolism
Polysaccharides, Bacterial - biosynthesis
Pyruvic Acid - metabolism
Abstract
The ethanol-grown cells of the mutant Acinetobacter sp. strain 1NG, incapable of producing exopolysaccharides, were analyzed for the activity of enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and some biosynthetic pathways. In spite of the presence of both key enzymes (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase) of the glyoxylate cycle, these cells also contained all enzymes of the TCA cycle, which presumably serves biosynthetic functions. This was evident from the high activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase and glutamate dehydrogenase and the low activity of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. Pyruvate was formed in the reaction catalyzed by oxaloacetate decarboxylase, whereas phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) was synthesized by the two key enzymes (PEP carboxykinase and PEP synthase) of gluconeogenesis. The proportion between these enzymes was different in the exponential and the stationary growth phases. The addition of the C4-dicarboxylic acid fumarate to the ethanol-containing growth medium led to a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in the activity of enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle, as well as of fumarate hydratase, malate dehydrogenase, PEP synthase, and PEP carboxykinase (the activity of the latter enzyme increased by more than 7.5 times). The data obtained can be used to improve the biotechnology of production of the microbial exopolysaccharide ethapolan on C2-substrates.
PubMed ID
14526533 View in PubMed
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Commentaries -- Nutrition and metabolism

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94108
Source
Pages 154-164 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
  1 document  
Source
Pages 154-164 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Aleuts
Diabetes mellitus
Direct photon absorptiometry
Disadaptive changes
Eskimos
Folate
Glucose tolerance
Indians
Iodine deficiency
Iron deficiency
Lactic Acid
Metabolic disease
Nganasans
Novosibirsk
Obesity
Phospholipids
Pribilof Islands
Pyruvic Acid
Rickets
Serum protein
Tlingits
Vitamin A
Notes
"Nutritional status of Indians and Eskimos as revealed by Nutrition Canada" (A.L. Forbes)
"Metabolic disease in arctic populations" (Edward M. Scott)
"Glucose tolerance among Aleuts on the Pribilof Islands" (S.E. Dippe, P.H. Bennett, D.W. Dippe, T. Humphry, J. Burks, and M. Miller)
"Biochemical mechanisms of human adaptation to the extreme factors of the north" (L. Panin)
"Bone mineral content of north Alaskan Eskimos" (Richard B. Mazess and Warren Mather)
"Bone mineral content in Canadian Eskimos" (Richard B. Mazess and Warren E. Mather)
Documents
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Detection of secondary insults by brain tissue pO2 and bedside microdialysis in severe head injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31434
Source
Acta Neurochir Suppl. 2002;81:319-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
A S Sarrafzadeh
O W Sakowitz
T A Callsen
W R Lanksch
A W Unterberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, Charité Campus Virchow Medical Center, Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany.
Source
Acta Neurochir Suppl. 2002;81:319-21
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Brain - metabolism
Child
Craniocerebral Trauma - complications - diagnosis - metabolism
Female
Glasgow Coma Scale
Glucose - metabolism
Humans
Intracranial Pressure
Lactates - metabolism
Male
Microdialysis - methods
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Organ Specificity
Oxygen - blood - metabolism
Oxygen consumption
Partial Pressure
Point-of-Care Systems
Pyruvic Acid - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
We evaluated bedside cerebral on-line microdialysis for early detection of cerebral hypoxia in patients with traumatic brain injury. 24 severely head injured patients (Glasgow Coma Score
PubMed ID
12168336 View in PubMed
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Effect of diet and training on muscle glycogen storage and utilization in sled dogs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4879
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1995 Nov;79(5):1601-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
A J Reynolds
L. Fuhrer
H L Dunlap
M. Finke
F A Kallfelz
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA.
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1995 Nov;79(5):1601-7
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Biopsy, Needle
Diet
Dogs - physiology
Glycogen - metabolism
Lactates - blood
Lactic Acid
Muscle, Skeletal - metabolism
Physical Conditioning, Animal - physiology
Pyruvates - blood
Pyruvic Acid
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Two groups of eight Alaskan huskies fed either a high-fat (HFD; 60% kcal from fat and 15% kcal from carbohydrate) or a high-carbohydrate diet (HCD; 60% kcal from carbohydrate and 15% kcal from fat) performed standard aerobic (1 h at 4 m/s on a 0% slope) and anaerobic (3 min at 6.7 m/s on a 10% slope) tests before and after training. Before and immediately after each exercise test, venous blood samples were collected and analyzed for lactate and pyruvate, and muscle biopsies were obtained under local anesthesia from the semitendinosus muscle and analyzed for total muscle glycogen (TMG) concentration. Training was associated with a significant increase in preexercise TMG in both diet groups; this effect was most marked in the HCD. There was no effect of diet or training on TMG utilization during the aerobic tests. The rate of TMG utilization during the anaerobic tests was between 20 and 40 times greater than that measured during the aerobic tests. The pre- to postexercise change in TMG was dependent on preexercise TMG in the HCD and HFD for both anaerobic tests (HCD: P
PubMed ID
8594020 View in PubMed
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Effect of vaporized ethanol on [1-14C]pyruvate kinetics in mice using a four-compartment closed model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10920
Source
Pharmacol Res. 1998 Jan;37(1):49-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
G. Wu
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biology, Odessa State University, Ukraine.
Source
Pharmacol Res. 1998 Jan;37(1):49-55
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Comparative Study
Ethanol - pharmacology
Half-Life
Inhalation Exposure
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred CBA
Models, Biological
Pyruvic Acid - pharmacokinetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The effect of the inhalation of vaporized ethanol on injected [1-14C]pyruvate kinetics was studied in mice. The [1-14C]pyruvate kinetics were modelled by means of a four-compartment closed model, i.e. injected site, blood, periphery and expired 14CO2. The results show that the inhalation of vaporized ethanol can stimulate expiration of 14CO2. The compartmental analysis suggests that the stimulation of expiration of 14CO2 is attributed to the increased trans-membrane and trans-tissue processes.
PubMed ID
9503480 View in PubMed
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Effects of a 1-yr stay at altitude on ventilation, metabolism, and work capacity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50230
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1992 Nov;73(5):1749-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1992
Author
T V Serebrovskaya
A A Ivashkevich
Author Affiliation
A.A. Bogomoletz Institute of Physiology, Kiev, Ukraine.
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1992 Nov;73(5):1749-55
Date
Nov-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Altitude
Carbon Dioxide - metabolism
Exercise Test
Humans
Hypercapnia - physiopathology
Lactates - blood
Lactic Acid
Male
Metabolism - physiology
Oxygen consumption
Physical Endurance - physiology
Pulmonary Gas Exchange - physiology
Pyruvates - blood
Pyruvic Acid
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Mechanics - physiology
Abstract
The hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory drive, gas exchange, blood lactate and pyruvate concentrations, acid-base balance, and physical working capacity were determined in three groups of healthy males: 17 residents examined at sea level (group I), 24 sea-level natives residing at 1,680-m altitude for 1 yr and examined there (group II), and 17 sea-level natives residing at 3,650-m altitude for 1 yr and examined there (group III). The piecewise linear approximation technique was used to study the ventilatory response curves, which allowed a separate analysis of slopes during the first phase of slow increase in ventilation and the second phase of sharp increase. The hypoxic ventilatory response for both isocapnic and poikilocapnic conditions was greater in group II and even greater in group III. The first signs of consciousness distortion in sea-level residents appeared at an end-tidal O2 pressure level (4.09 +/- 0.56 kPa) higher than that of temporary residents of middle (3.05 +/- 0.12) and high altitude (2.90 +/- 0.07). The hypercapnic response was also increased, although to a lesser degree. Subjects with the highest hypoxic respiratory sensitivity at high altitude demonstrated greater O2 consumption at rest, greater ventilatory response to exercise, higher physical capacity, and a less pronounced anaerobic glycolytic flux but a lower tolerance to extreme hypoxia. That is, end-tidal O2 pressure that caused a distortion of the consciousness was higher in these subjects than in those with lower hypoxic sensitivity. Two extreme types of adaptation strategy can be distinguished: active, with marked reactions of "struggle for oxygen," and passive, with reduced O2 metabolism, as well as several intermediate types.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1474047 View in PubMed
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Ethanol inhalation on 1-[14C]-pyruvate kinetics in mice using a six-compartment closed model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10596
Source
Eur J Drug Metab Pharmacokinet. 1999 Apr-Jun;24(2):113-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
G. Wu
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biology, Odessa State University, Ukraine.
Source
Eur J Drug Metab Pharmacokinet. 1999 Apr-Jun;24(2):113-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Animals
Carbon - urine
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Drug Interactions
Ethanol - pharmacology
Feces - chemistry
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred CBA
Pyruvic Acid - pharmacokinetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics
Time Factors
Abstract
1-[14C]-pyruvate kinetics were studied in mice with and without inhalation of vaporised ethanol. The 1-[14C]-pyruvate kinetics were modelled by a six-compartment closed model, i.e. injected site, blood, periphery, expired 14CO2 in air, eliminated 14C in urine and faeces, using the system of differential equations. The results show that the inhalation of vaporised ethanol can stimulate expiration of 14CO2. The completely analytical solution of the six-compartment closed model was found using Laplace transform. The kinetic parameters were estimated using the analytical solutions for the fourth, fifth and sixth compartments to fit eliminated 14CO2, and 14C in urine and faeces. The compartmental analysis showed that the inhalation of vaporised ethanol can stimulate 1-[14C]-pyruvate transmembrane process from injected site to blood and 14C trans-tissue process from periphery to blood.
PubMed ID
10510737 View in PubMed
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[Exopolysaccharide production and peculiarities of C6-metabolism in Acinetobacter sp. grown on carbohydrate substrates]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9971
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2002 Mar-Apr;71(2):215-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
T P Pirog
M A Kovalenko
Iu V Kuz'minskaia
Author Affiliation
Zabolotnyi Institute of Microbiology and Virology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine. pirog@serv.imv.kiev.ua
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2002 Mar-Apr;71(2):215-21
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetates - metabolism
Acinetobacter - growth & development - metabolism
Carbohydrate Metabolism
Comparative Study
Culture Media
Disaccharides - metabolism
English Abstract
Ethanol - metabolism
Glucose - metabolism
Molasses
Polysaccharides, Bacterial - biosynthesis
Pyruvic Acid - metabolism
Substrate Specificity
Abstract
An Acinetobacter sp. strain grown on carbohydrate substrates (mono- and disaccharides, molasses, starch) was shown to synthesize exopolysaccharides (EPS). Glucose catabolism proved to proceed via the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas and Entner-Doudoroff pathways. Pyruvate entered the tricarboxylic acid cycle due to pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. Pyruvate carboxylation by pyruvate carboxylase was the anaplerotic reaction providing for the synthesis of intermediates for the constructive metabolism of Acinetobacter sp. grown on C6-substrates. The C6-metabolism in Acinetobacter sp. was limited by coenzyme A. Irrespective of the carbohydrate growth substrate (glucose, ethanol), the activities of the key enzymes of both C2- and C6-metabolism was high, except for the isocitrate lyase activity in glucose-grown bacteria. Isocitrate lyase activity was induced by C2-compounds (ethanol or acetate). After their addition to glucose-containing medium, both substrates were utilized simultaneously, and an increase was observed in the EPS synthesis, as well as in the EPS yield relative to biomass. The mechanisms responsible for enhancing the EPS synthesis in Acinetobacter sp. grown on a mixture of C2- and C6-substrates are discussed.
PubMed ID
12024822 View in PubMed
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Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate for improved outcome after hypothermic circulatory arrest in pigs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9770
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2003 Mar;125(3):686-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Pekka Romsi
Timo Kaakinen
Kai Kiviluoma
Vilho Vainionpää
Jorma Hirvonen
Matti Pokela
Pasi Ohtonen
Fausto Biancari
Matti Nuutinen
Tatu Juvonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2003 Mar;125(3):686-98
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Brain Chemistry
Brain Ischemia - etiology - metabolism - mortality - prevention & control
Calcium - blood
Creatine Kinase - blood
Creatine Kinase, MB Form
Disease Models, Animal
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
Female
Fructosediphosphates - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Glucose - analysis
Glycerol - analysis
Heart Arrest, Induced - adverse effects
Hypothermia, Induced - adverse effects
Infusions, Intravenous
Isoenzymes - blood
Lactic Acid - analysis
Neuroprotective Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Phosphorus - blood
Pyruvic Acid - analysis
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sodium - blood
Survival Analysis
Swine
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate is a high-energy intermediate in the anaerobic metabolism. It enhances glycolysis, preserves cellular adenosine triphosphate, and prevents the increase of intracellular calcium during ischemia. The potential neuroprotective effect of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate during hypothermic circulatory arrest was evaluated in a surviving porcine model. METHODS: Twenty-four pigs were randomly assigned to receive two intravenous infusions of either fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (500 mg/kg) or saline solution. The first infusion was given immediately before a 75-minute period of hypothermic circulatory arrest and the second was given immediately after hypothermic circulatory arrest. RESULTS: The 7-day survivals were 83.3% in the fructose-1,6-bisphosphate group and 41.7% in the control group (P =.09). The treated animals had significantly better postoperative behavioral scores. The administration of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate was associated with higher venous phosphate and sodium levels, lower venous ionized calcium levels, higher blood osmolarity, and a better fluid balance. Intracranial pressure and venous creatine kinase isoenzyme MB were significantly lower in the fructose-1,6-bisphosphate group during rewarming (P =.01 and P =.001, respectively). Among the treated animals, brain glucose, pyruvate and lactate levels tended to be higher, brain glycerol levels tended to be lower, and the histopathologic score of the brain was significantly lower (P =.04). CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous administration of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate at 500 mg/kg before and after hypothermic circulatory arrest in a surviving porcine model was associated with better survival, behavioral outcome, and histopathologic score. The observed lower blood creatine kinase isoenzyme MB and brain glycerol levels and the higher brain glucose, pyruvate, and lactate levels in the fructose-1,6-bisphosphate group suggest that this drug has supportive effects on myocardial and brain metabolisms.
PubMed ID
12658213 View in PubMed
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Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate supports cerebral energy metabolism in pigs after ischemic brain injury caused by experimental particle embolization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81178
Source
Heart Surg Forum. 2006;9(6):E828-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Kaakinen Timo
Heikkinen Janne
Dahlbacka Sebastian
Alaoja Hanna
Laurila Päivi
Kiviluoma Kai
Salomäki Timo
Romsi Pekka
Tuominen Hannu
Biancari Fausto
Lepola Pasi
Nuutinen Matti
Juvonen Tatu
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. timo.kaakinen@oulu.fi
Source
Heart Surg Forum. 2006;9(6):E828-35
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Brain - drug effects - metabolism
Brain Ischemia - etiology - metabolism
Circulatory Arrest, Deep Hypothermia Induced - adverse effects
Disease Models, Animal
Energy Metabolism - drug effects
Fructosediphosphates - administration & dosage
Intracranial Embolism - etiology - metabolism
Lactic Acid - metabolism
Neuroprotective Agents - administration & dosage
Pyruvic Acid - metabolism
Swine
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FDP) is a high-energy intermediate that enhances glycolysis, preserves cellular adenosine triphosphate stores, and prevents the increase of intracellular calcium in ischemic tissue. Since it has been shown to provide metabolic support to the brain during ischemia, we planned this study to evaluate whether FDP is neuroprotective in the setting of combining hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) and irreversible embolic brain ischemic injury. METHODS: Twenty pigs were randomly assigned to receive 2 intravenous infusions of either FDP (500 mg/kg) or saline. The first infusion was given just before a 25-minute period of HCA and the second infusion immediately after HCA. Immediately before HCA, the descending aorta was clamped and 200 mg of albumin-coated polystyrene microspheres (250-750 mm in diameter) were injected into the isolated aortic arch in both study groups. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the study groups in terms of neurological outcome. Brain lactate/pyruvate ratio was significantly lower (P = .015) and brain pyruvate levels (P = .013) were significantly higher in the FDP group compared with controls. Brain lactate levels were significantly higher 8 hours after HCA (P = .049). CONCLUSION: The administration of FDP before and immediately after HCA combined with embolic brain ischemic injury was associated with significantly lower brain lactate/pyruvate ratio and significantly higher levels of brain pyruvate, as well as lower lactate levels 8 hours after HCA. FDP seems to protect the brain by supporting energy metabolism. The neurological outcome was not improved, most likely resulting from the irreversible nature of the microsphere occlusion.
PubMed ID
16893758 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.