Skip header and navigation

Refine By

14 records – page 1 of 2.

The 3 mm skin prick test (SPT) threshold criterion is not reliable for Tyrophagus putrescentiae: the re-evaluation of SPT criterion to dust mites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71486
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
B. Kanceljak-Macan
J. Macan
D. Plavec
T. Klepac
S. Milkovic-Kraus
Author Affiliation
Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb, Croatia.
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Comparative Study
Croatia
Cross Reactions - immunology
Dermatophagoides farinae - immunology
Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Proteins - immunology
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Skin Tests - standards
Urban health
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The mean wheal diameter >/= 3 mm is the usual criterion for positive skin prick test (SPT) reaction to dust mites. The study assessed the accuracy of this SPT criterion with respect to specific IgE values of above 0.35 kUA/l (+ sIgE). METHODS: Specific IgE (ImmunoCAP, Pharmacia AB Diagnostics, Uppsala, Sweden) and standard SPT to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP) and farinae (DF), Lepidoglyphus destructor (LD) and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (TP) (ALK, Hørsholm, Denmark) were performed in a random sample of 457 subjects, of whom 273 men (mean age 35.3 +/- 11.0 years) and 184 women (mean age 37.9 +/- 9.5 years). Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test, regression analysis and discriminant analysis. RESULTS: When the mean wheal diameter of >/= 3 mm was considered positive (+ SPT), the correlation between + SPT and + sIgE was 0.47 for DP (P
PubMed ID
12464048 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allergy to carmine red (E120) is not dependent on concurrent mite allergy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150985
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2009;150(2):179-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Jussi Liippo
Kaija Lammintausta
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. jussi.liippo@utu.fi
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2009;150(2):179-83
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Anaphylaxis - epidemiology
Angioedema - epidemiology - immunology
Animals
Carmine - adverse effects
Dermatophagoides farinae - immunology
Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus - immunology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Food Additives - adverse effects
Food Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Penaeidae - immunology
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Questionnaires
Skin Tests
Urticaria - epidemiology - immunology
Abstract
Positive skin prick test (SPT) reactions to carmine red (E120) have been reported to occur concurrently with reactions to mites. The relationships between positive SPT reactions to carmine, carmine allergy and concurrent mite reactions are unknown. The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of carmine sensitization and its clinical importance among patients with suspected allergy to food additives.
The occurrence of positive SPT reactions to mites was studied in 6,464 patients: 3,164 were tested with carmine and 2,837 with shrimp. Carmine ingestion-associated symptoms were registered at the time of testing. Patients with positive SPT to carmine received a follow-up questionnaire on their symptoms 1-5 years later.
Positive SPT reactions to carmine were seen in 94 patients (3.0%) of whom 74% also had positive SPT reactions to mites and 22% to shrimp. Carmine ingestion-associated symptoms were not dependent on concurrent mite reactivity in 39/94 (42%) patients.
Carmine sensitization without sensitization to mites is seen in one fourth of the patients. Allergic reactions to carmine are not dependent on concurrent reactivity to mites.
PubMed ID
19439984 View in PubMed
Less detail

Contribution of dust mite and cat specific IgE to total IgE: relevance to asthma prevalence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78841
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007 Feb;119(2):359-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Erwin Elizabeth A
Rönmark Eva
Wickens Kristin
Perzanowski Matthew S
Barry David
Lundbäck Bo
Crane Julian
Platts-Mills Thomas A E
Author Affiliation
University of Virginia Asthma and Allergic Diseases Center, Charlottesville, VA, USA.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007 Feb;119(2):359-65
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Cats - immunology
Child
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Prevalence
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The prevalence of asthma is strikingly different in some Westernized countries: approximately 20% in New Zealand and approximately 8% in northern Sweden. OBJECTIVE: We investigated differences in total IgE and in the prevalence of wheezing related to the observation that high exposure to dust mite allergens induces high titers of IgE antibodies. METHODS: Two age-matched, population-based cohorts-1155 children in New Zealand (224 sera) and 3431 children (797 sera) in the Norrbotten area of Sweden-were studied. Sera were assayed for total IgE and specific IgE antibodies to relevant allergens. RESULTS: The mean total IgE among wheezing children was higher in New Zealand than Sweden (218 IU/mL vs 65.2 IU/mL; P or =50 IU/mL) was greater among the wheezing children in New Zealand compared with Sweden (35.7% vs 13.0%; P or =200 IU/mL; r = 0.47; P
PubMed ID
17291853 View in PubMed
Less detail

House dust mite control measures for asthma: systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85784
Source
Allergy. 2008 Jun;63(6):646-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Gøtzsche P C
Johansen H K
Author Affiliation
Nordic Cochrane Centre, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Allergy. 2008 Jun;63(6):646-59
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Asthma - etiology - immunology - prevention & control
Bedding and Linens
Dust - immunology
Environmental Exposure - prevention & control
Humans
Insecticides
Pest Control - methods
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Abstract
The major allergen in house dust comes from mites. We performed a systematic review of the randomized trials that had assessed the effects of reducing exposure to house dust mite antigens in the homes of people with mite-sensitive asthma, and had compared active interventions with placebo or no treatment. Fifty-four trials (3002 patients) were included. Thirty-six trials assessed physical methods (26 mattress covers), 10 chemical methods and eight a combination of chemical and physical methods. Despite the fact that many trials were of poor quality and would be expected to exaggerate the reported effect, we did not find an effect of the interventions. For the most frequently reported outcome, peak flow in the morning (1565 patients), the standardized mean difference was 0.00 (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.10 to 0.10). There were no statistically significant differences in number of patients improved (relative risk 1.01, 95% CI 0.80-1.27), asthma symptom scores (standardized mean difference -0.04, 95% CI -0.15 to 0.07) or in medication usage (standardized mean difference -0.06, 95% CI -0.18 to 0.07). Chemical and physical methods aimed at reducing exposure to house dust mite allergens cannot be recommended.
PubMed ID
18445182 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nonlinear relations between house dust mite allergen levels and mite sensitization in farm and nonfarm children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82410
Source
Allergy. 2006 May;61(5):640-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Schram-Bijkerk D.
Doekes G.
Boeve M.
Douwes J.
Riedler J.
Ublagger E.
von Mutius E.
Budde J.
Pershagen G.
van Hage M.
Wickman M.
Braun-Fahrländer C.
Waser M.
Brunekreef B.
Author Affiliation
Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, University of Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
Source
Allergy. 2006 May;61(5):640-7
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pollution, Indoor - statistics & numerical data
Allergens - analysis - immunology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - immunology
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Male
Nonlinear Dynamics
Prevalence
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Risk factors
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Low sensitization rates to common allergens have been observed in farm children, which might be due to high exposure to microbial agents. It is not known how microbial agents modify the association between specific allergen exposure and sensitization. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relations between house dust mite allergen exposure and mite sensitization in farm and nonfarm children and to assess the effects of microbial agents levels on this association. METHODS: Major mite allergens of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p 1) and Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f 1), endotoxin, beta(1,3)-glucans and fungal extracellular polysaccharides were measured in mattress dust of 402 children participating in a cross-sectional study in five European countries. Mite allergen (Der p 1 + Der f 1) levels were divided into tertiles with cut-offs 1.4 and 10.4 microg/g. Sensitization was assessed by measurement of allergen-specific immunoglobulin E against house dust mite. RESULTS: Prevalence ratios of mite sensitization for medium and high when compared with low mite allergen levels were 3.1 [1.7-5.7] and 1.4 [0.7-2.8] respectively. Highest mite sensitization rates at intermediate exposure levels were consistently observed across country (except for Sweden) and in both farm and nonfarm children. The shape of the dose-response curve was similar for above and below median mattress microbial agent levels, but the 'sensitization peak' appeared to be lower for above median levels. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest a bell-shaped dose-response relationship between mite allergen exposure and sensitization to mite allergens. In populations with high microbial agent levels and low sensitization rates, the curve is shifted down.
PubMed ID
16629797 View in PubMed
Less detail

Occupational sensitization to storage mites in the personnel of a water-damaged grocery store.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170212
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2006 Aug;79(7):602-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Tiina Koistinen
Pirkko Ruoppi
Tuula Putus
Sirpa Pennanen
Anu Harju
Juhani Nuutinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O.Box 1777, 70211, Kuopio, Finland. tiina.koistinen@kuh.fi
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2006 Aug;79(7):602-6
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disasters
Female
Finland
Food Industry
Humans
Male
Occupational Exposure
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To investigate the occupational exposure and sensitization to storage mites (SM) in sales staff working in a moisture-damaged and three healthy reference buildings.
The study population consisted of the entire personnel (n=12) in the moisture-damaged grocery store. They all suffered from persistent upper respiratory tract symptoms. Twelve (in results 11) symptom-free controls working in three healthy reference groceries were matched with age, sex and occupation. Dust samples from each building were examined for mites. The clinical study consisted of otorhinolaryngological examination and determination of IgE reactivity. Specific serum IgE antibodies were measured against three SMs and two house dust mites (HDM). Skin prick tests (SPT) were made to the same five mites and to five common aeroallergens. If sensitization to any of the SMs was detected, a nasal provocation test (NPT) was performed.
SMs were found in all buildings. In all, seven cases and four control subjects showed IgE-mediated reactivity. Sensitization to mites was detected in six cases and in three controls and in 2/12 and 3/11 this was the only IgE antibody response observed. In addition, one case and one control subject were sensitized to common aeroallergens. NPT with SMs was positive in four cases and in one control.
In grocery stores, the personnel are exposed to SMs. The risk of sensitization to mites is obvious and an IgE response can occur without any reactivity to common aeroallergens. SM allergy may in some cases explain the chronic rhinitis related to moisture-damaged buildings.
PubMed ID
16544169 View in PubMed
Less detail

Phenotypic comparison of allergic airway responses to house dust mite in three rat strains.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15281
Source
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2003 Apr;284(4):L588-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Pramila Singh
Mary Daniels
Darrell W Winsett
Judy Richards
Donald Doerfler
Gary Hatch
Kenneth B Adler
M Ian Gilmour
Author Affiliation
North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh 27606, USA.
Source
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2003 Apr;284(4):L588-98
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Asthma - genetics - immunology - pathology
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - chemistry - immunology
Cell Division - immunology
Comparative Study
Female
Hypersensitivity - genetics - immunology - pathology
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Interferon Type II - analysis
Interleukin-13 - analysis
Lung - immunology - pathology
Lymph Nodes - cytology - immunology
Lymphocytes - cytology - immunology
Phenotype
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Species Specificity
Variation (Genetics) - immunology
Abstract
Brown Norway (BN) rats develop a robust response to antigens in the lung, characterized by a large increase in allergen-specific immune function and pulmonary eosinophilia. The objective of this study was to investigate alternative models by determining whether other rat strains could be sensitized to house dust mite (HDM) antigen and whether the allergic disease process could be worsened with repeated allergen exposure. In general, BN rats sensitized by either subcutaneous or intratracheal routes exhibited increased pulmonary allergy compared with Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Lewis (L) rats. Multiple intratracheal allergen exposures incrementally increased HDM-specific immune function in BN rats but progressively decreased eosinophil recruitment and markers of lung injury. SD rats had more moderate responses, whereas L rats were relatively unresponsive. Because BN rats developed stronger clinical hallmarks of allergic asthma under various immunization regimes compared with SD and L rats, we conclude that the BN is the most appropriate strain for studying allergic asthma-like responses in rats. Phenotypic differences in response to HDM were associated with differences in the Th1/Th2 cytokine balance and antioxidant capacity.
PubMed ID
12618421 View in PubMed
Less detail

Relationship between total and specific IgE in patients with asthma from Siberia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86819
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2008 Mar;121(3):781; author reply 781
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008

Respiratory health and allergy among young farmers and non-farming rural males in Denmark: the SUS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95328
Source
J Agromedicine. 2004;9(2):223-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Sigsgaard Torben
Hjort Charlotte
Omland Øyvind
Miller Martin R
Pedersen Ole Find
Author Affiliation
STENO Center of Public Health Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Aarhus, DK.
Source
J Agromedicine. 2004;9(2):223-38
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dust - immunology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Rural Health
Rural Population
Skin Tests
Students
Young Adult
Abstract
The respiratory health of 230 female and 1,734 male farming students (FS) and 407 male rural controls was analyzed. A significantly increased prevalence of cough (6.9%) was reported among the male FS compared to the controls (2.5%). Measured FEV1 and FVC did not differ between the male FS and the controls, as opposed to significantly higher values among the female FS compared to a random sample of urban females stratified for height. Skin prick test (SPT) to house dust and storage mites was significantly more prevalent among the controls (18.7%) compared to the male FS (12.8%) and the female FS (11.9%). The size of the house dust mite weal and the number of positive skin prick reactions were significantly associated with bronchial hyperreactivity. The difference in lung function among the female FS and the lower prevalence of skin reaction among the male FS and female FS probably reflects a healthy workers selection.
PubMed ID
19785218 View in PubMed
Less detail

14 records – page 1 of 2.