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Age- and sex-related differences in vascular function and vascular response to mental stress. Longitudinal and cross-sectional studies in a cohort of healthy children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129710
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Jan;220(1):269-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Yun Chen
Frida Dangardt
Walter Osika
Krister Berggren
Eva Gronowitz
Peter Friberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine/Clinical Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy and University Hospital, University of Gothenburg, SE 41345 Gothenburg, Sweden. yun.chen@wlab.gu.se
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Jan;220(1):269-74
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Carotid Arteries - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fingers - physiopathology
Hemodynamics
Humans
Hyperemia - physiopathology
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Manometry
Mathematical Concepts
Motor Activity
Pulsatile Flow
Questionnaires
Radial Artery - physiopathology
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - physiopathology
Sweden
Vasoconstriction
Vasodilation
Abstract
Limited data, especially from longitudinal studies, are available regarding vascular health assessment in childhood. In this study, we performed longitudinal and cross-sectional studies in healthy children and adolescents to investigate age- and sex-related differences in vascular functions and vascular response to mental stress.
Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured by tonometry. Endothelial function and vascular response to mental arithmetic test were assessed using a peripheral artery tonometry device. Data were obtained in 162 adolescents (mean age of 17 years, 94 girls) in a 3-year follow-up study and 241 children (mean age of 10 years, 115 girls) in a first-time investigation. Physical activity was assessed in adolescents by a self-report questionnaire.
Our 3-year follow-up study revealed that the increased PWV was greater in male adolescents (0.79±0.79m/s) than in females (0.27±0.89m/s, p
PubMed ID
22078247 View in PubMed
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Arterial pulse wave velocity in relation to carotid intima-media thickness, brachial flow-mediated dilation and carotid artery distensibility: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study and the Health 2000 Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131842
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Feb;220(2):387-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Teemu Koivistoinen
Marko Virtanen
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Terho Lehtimäki
Antti Jula
Markus Juonala
Leena Moilanen
Heikki Aatola
Jari Hyttinen
Jorma S A Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Mika Kähönen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital, FI-33521, Tampere, Finland. teemu.koivistoinen@uta.fi
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Feb;220(2):387-93
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Brachial Artery - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Arteries - pathology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - physiopathology
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Chi-Square Distribution
Compliance
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Plethysmography, Impedance
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Pulsatile Flow
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vasodilation
Abstract
Increased arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a strong predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality. The data regarding the relationships between PWV and other indices of vascular damage is limited and partly controversial. We conducted the present study to examine PWV in relation to non-invasive measures of early atherosclerosis (brachial flow-mediated dilation [FMD], carotid intima-media thickness [IMT]) and local arterial stiffness (carotid artery distensibility [Cdist]).
The study population consisted of 1754 young adults (aged 30-45 years, 45.5% males) participating in the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (YFS), and of 336 older adults (aged 46-76 years, 43.2% males) participating in the Health 2000 Survey. FMD was measured only in the YFS cohort. FMD, IMT and Cdist were assessed by ultrasound, and PWV was measured using the whole-body impedance cardiography device.
In young adults, FMD and IMT were not associated with PWV independently of cardiovascular risk factors. Moreover, FMD status was not found to modulate the association between cardiovascular risk factors and PWV. In older adults, PWV and IMT were directly and independently associated (?=1.233, p=0.019). In both cohorts, PWV was inversely related with Cdist, and this relation remained significant (p
Notes
Comment In: Atherosclerosis. 2012 Feb;220(2):319-2021899842
PubMed ID
21871623 View in PubMed
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Arterial stiffness, but not endothelium-dependent vasodilation, is related to a low Ankle-Brachial index. The Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139303
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2011 May;31(3):182-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Lars Lind
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. lars.lind@medsci.uu.se
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2011 May;31(3):182-7
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Ankle Brachial Index
Blood pressure
Brachial Artery - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Arteries - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Chi-Square Distribution
Compliance
Echocardiography, Doppler, Color
Endothelium, Vascular - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Female
Humans
Lower Extremity - blood supply
Male
Peripheral Arterial Disease - diagnosis - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Plethysmography
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Pulsatile Flow
Stroke Volume
Sweden
Vasodilation
Abstract
Arterial compliance and endothelium-dependent vasodilation are two characteristics of the vessel wall. In the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study we studied the relationships between arterial compliance and endothelium-dependent vasodilation versus the Ankle-Brachial index (ABI), a clinically used index of peripheral artery disease.
In the population-based PIVUS study (all aged 70), arterial compliance was determined by ultrasound as the distensibility of the carotid artery and the stroke volume to pulse pressure (SV/PP) ratio by echocardiography, while endothelium-dependent vasodilation was assessed by the invasive forearm technique with acetylcholine (EDV) and brachial artery ultrasound (FMD) in 519 subjects in whom the Ankle-Brachial index was investigated.
After adjustments for gender and Framingham risk score, distensibility in the carotid artery and the SV/PP ratio were significantly reduced in subjects with a reduced ABI (
PubMed ID
21078066 View in PubMed
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Arterial stiffness, pressure and flow pulsatility and brain structure and function: the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility--Reykjavik study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129735
Source
Brain. 2011 Nov;134(Pt 11):3398-407
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Gary F Mitchell
Mark A van Buchem
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
John D Gotal
Maria K Jonsdottir
Ólafur Kjartansson
Melissa Garcia
Thor Aspelund
Tamara B Harris
Vilmundur Gudnason
Lenore J Launer
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Engineering, Inc., Norwood, MA 02062, USA. garyfmitchell@mindspring.com
Source
Brain. 2011 Nov;134(Pt 11):3398-407
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aorta - physiopathology
Blood Flow Velocity - physiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Brain - blood supply - pathology - physiopathology
Cardiovascular Diseases - pathology - physiopathology
Carotid Arteries - physiopathology
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Iceland
Male
Prospective Studies
Pulsatile Flow - physiology
Risk factors
Vascular Stiffness - physiology
Abstract
Aortic stiffness increases with age and vascular risk factor exposure and is associated with increased risk for structural and functional abnormalities in the brain. High ambient flow and low impedance are thought to sensitize the cerebral microcirculation to harmful effects of excessive pressure and flow pulsatility. However, haemodynamic mechanisms contributing to structural brain lesions and cognitive impairment in the presence of high aortic stiffness remain unclear. We hypothesized that disproportionate stiffening of the proximal aorta as compared with the carotid arteries reduces wave reflection at this important interface and thereby facilitates transmission of excessive pulsatile energy into the cerebral microcirculation, leading to microvascular damage and impaired function. To assess this hypothesis, we evaluated carotid pressure and flow, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, brain magnetic resonance images and cognitive scores in participants in the community-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility--Reykjavik study who had no history of stroke, transient ischaemic attack or dementia (n = 668, 378 females, 69-93 years of age). Aortic characteristic impedance was assessed in a random subset (n = 422) and the reflection coefficient at the aorta-carotid interface was computed. Carotid flow pulsatility index was negatively related to the aorta-carotid reflection coefficient (R = -0.66, P
Notes
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PubMed ID
22075523 View in PubMed
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Association of severe placental insufficiency and systemic venous pressure rise in the fetus with increased neonatal cardiac troponin T levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54039
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2000 Sep;183(3):726-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
K. Mäkikallio
O. Vuolteenaho
P. Jouppila
J. Räsänen
Author Affiliation
Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Physiology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2000 Sep;183(3):726-31
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Blood Flow Velocity
Cardiomyopathies - blood - etiology
Female
Fetus - physiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Hypertension - blood - complications
Infant, Newborn
Placental Insufficiency - complications - physiopathology
Pre-Eclampsia - blood - complications
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Pulsatile Flow
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Troponin T - blood
Umbilical Arteries
Uterus - blood supply
Venous Pressure
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that severe placental insufficiency and a rise in fetal systemic venous pressure are associated with fetal myocardial cell damage, which in turn leads to increased neonatal troponin T levels. STUDY DESIGN: Sixty-six neonates born after uncomplicated pregnancy and delivery were included in the control group. Study groups 1 and 2 consisted of 32 and 5 neonates, respectively, born to women with hypertensive disorder. In study group 1 the fetal intra-abdominal portion of the umbilical vein showed normal nonpulsatile blood flow pattern in every case. In study group 2 all the fetuses had atrial pulsations in the intraabdominal umbilical vein. After delivery blood samples were collected from the umbilical arteries, and cardiac troponin T concentrations were measured with commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. A clinically significant troponin T level was set at >/=0.10 ng/mL. RESULTS: In study group 1 the maternal main uterine arterial blood flow pattern was normal in 30 cases and abnormal in 2 cases. Umbilical artery blood velocity waveforms were normal in 26 fetuses, 4 fetuses had a decreased diastolic blood flow, 1 fetus had an absent diastolic blood flow pattern, and 1 fetus had a retrograde diastolic blood flow pattern. In study group 2 maternal uterine arterial Doppler findings were abnormal in every case, and all the fetuses had retrograde diastolic blood flow pattern in the umbilical artery. Neonatal troponin T levels were 0.10 ng/mL, with the range from 0.11 to 0.35 ng/mL. In study group 2 troponin T concentrations were significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
10992200 View in PubMed
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Atorvastatin treatment is associated with less augmentation of the carotid pressure waveform in hypertension: a substudy of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcome Trial (ASCOT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148799
Source
Hypertension. 2009 Nov;54(5):1009-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Charlotte Manisty
Jamil Mayet
Robyn J Tapp
Peter S Sever
Neil Poulter
Simon A McG Thom
Alun D Hughes
Author Affiliation
International Centre for Circulatory Health, Imperial College London & Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London W2 1LA, UK.
Source
Hypertension. 2009 Nov;54(5):1009-13
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Amlodipine - therapeutic use
Ankle Brachial Index
Anticholesteremic Agents - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination
Carotid Arteries - drug effects - physiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Great Britain
Heptanoic Acids - therapeutic use
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Probability
Prospective Studies
Pulsatile Flow - drug effects
Pyrroles - therapeutic use
Reproducibility of Results
Scandinavia
Severity of Illness Index
Vasodilator Agents - therapeutic use
Abstract
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) reduce cardiovascular events in hypertensive subjects, but their effect on carotid BP, pressure augmentation, and wave reflection is unknown. We compared the effect of atorvastatin with placebo in a substudy of the lipid-lowering arm of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT-LLA). Hypertensive patients (n=142; age=43 to 79 years; 127 male) with total cholesterol
Notes
Comment In: Hypertension. 2009 Nov;54(5):958-919720953
PubMed ID
19720956 View in PubMed
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Central blood pressure as an index of antihypertensive control: determinants and potential value.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104464
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 May;30(5 Suppl):S23-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Luc Trudeau
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Prevention Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada. Electronic address: Luc.trudeau@mcgill.ca.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 May;30(5 Suppl):S23-8
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage
Blood Pressure - drug effects - physiology
Blood Pressure Determination
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Carotid Arteries - physiology
Female
Hemodynamics - drug effects - physiology
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Male
Pulsatile Flow - drug effects - physiology
Pulse
Radial Artery - physiology
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Resistance - drug effects
Vascular Stiffness - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
The measurement of central blood pressure has generated interest as a tool in predicting cardiovascular events. The purpose of this article is to review the meaning and measurement of the central blood pressure and consider its potential value as an index of the antihypertensive response. Indirect estimation of central aortic pressures is obtained by the study of the radial pulse wave compared with a central pulse wave contour measured at the carotid or femoral artery level. The sum of the forward pressure wave created by ventricular contraction and of the reflected pressure wave from the peripheral arterial system produce the peak systolic blood pressure in the aorta. Measurement of the peripheral reflected-wave contribution to aortic blood pressure can be quantified as the augmentation index. Also, the increase in the rapidity of this travelling wave can be measured as the pulse wave velocity. These 2 parameters are considered to be valid indices of the peripheral arterial stiffness. Along with the calculation of systolic and diastolic aortic pressures, these measurements can give a better understanding of the actual central blood pressure to which core organs like heart, brain, and kidneys are submitted. There is tantalizing evidence for the potential value of central blood pressure as a useful index of antihypertensive action, but until clear evidence is obtained, its use should continue to be considered exploratory.
PubMed ID
24750979 View in PubMed
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Circadian blood pressure variation in patients with type 2 diabetes--relationship to macro- and microvascular subclinical organ damage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134738
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2011 Oct;5(3):167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Pär E son Jennersjö
Magnus Wijkman
Ann-Britt Wiréhn
Toste Länne
Jan Engvall
Fredrik H Nystrom
Carl J Östgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2011 Oct;5(3):167-73
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - etiology - physiopathology
Aorta - physiopathology
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Carotid Arteries - physiopathology
Circadian Rhythm
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - physiopathology
Diabetic Angiopathies - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Diabetic Nephropathies - etiology - physiopathology
Early Diagnosis
Echocardiography, Doppler
Female
Femoral Artery - physiopathology
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Kidney - physiopathology
Linear Models
Male
Manometry
Microcirculation
Middle Aged
Office Visits
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Pulsatile Flow
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
To explore the association between nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipper status and macro- and microvascular organ damage in type 2 diabetes.
Cross-sectional data from 663 patients with type 2 diabetes, aged 55-66 years, were analysed. Nurses measured office BP and ambulatory BP during 24h. Individuals with = 10% difference in nocturnal systolic blood pressure (SBP) relative to daytime values were defined as dippers. Non-dippers were defined as
PubMed ID
21546328 View in PubMed
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[Color Doppler blood flow measurements and microvessel density assessment in ovarian tumors]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18037
Source
Ginekol Pol. 2003 Sep;74(9):695-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Artur Czekierdowski
Marek Szymanski
Justyna Szumilo
Jan Kotarski
Author Affiliation
I Katedry i Kliniki Ginekologii AM W Lublinie.
Source
Ginekol Pol. 2003 Sep;74(9):695-700
Date
Sep-2003
Language
Polish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Antibodies, Monoclonal - diagnostic use
Antigens, CD34 - blood
Blood Flow Velocity
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Microcirculation
Middle Aged
Neovascularization, Pathologic
Ovarian Neoplasms - blood supply - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Poland
Pulsatile Flow
Reproducibility of Results
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color - methods
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Pulsed - methods
Vascular Resistance
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to compare ultrasound vascular blood flow indices with the expression of CD-34 in women with benign and malignant adnexal tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Transvaginal color and pulsed Doppler sonography was performed before surgical procedure in 105 women with adnexal tumors. Blood flow indices: pulsatility index (PI) and resistive index (RI) in blood vessels with the highest flow velocity were measured within each tumor. Immunohistochemical analysis of microvessel density (MVD) was performed on representative highly vascular tumor specimens fixed in 10% formalin and paraffin embedded. The primary monoclonal mouse anti-human CD-34 antibody (1:25, DAKO, Denmark) was used. Statistical calculations included group comparison with Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA on ranks and correlation analysis (Statistica for Windows 6.0, Statsoft Poland). RESULTS: Mean age of the studied women was 55.6 +/- 11.5 yrs. Of 104 tumors, 35 (33.6%) were benign and 69 (66.4%) were malignant. The latter included 14 FIGO stage I cases. Low resistance or pulsatility indices (RI
PubMed ID
14674110 View in PubMed
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Color Doppler flow as an indicator of trophoblastic activity in tubal pregnancies detected by transvaginal ultrasound.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64893
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1992 Dec;80(6):995-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
A. Tekay
P. Jouppila
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1992 Dec;80(6):995-9
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chorionic Gonadotropin - blood
Embryo - blood supply
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Tubal - blood - ultrasonography
Pulsatile Flow
Regional Blood Flow
Trophoblasts - ultrasonography
Ultrasonography - methods
Uterus - blood supply
Vagina
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the potential benefits of transvaginal color Doppler in the diagnostic evaluation of tubal pregnancies. METHODS: Fifty-two women with suspected tubal pregnancy were examined by transvaginal ultrasonography and color Doppler. Those with positive scans were referred for exploratory laparoscopy. The area of the tubal pregnancy was examined by color flow imaging and the resistance indexes (RIs) of the artery blood flows were calculated. The pulsatility indexes (PIs) of both uterine arteries were also measured and serum beta-hCG was quantitated. RESULTS: Tubal pregnancy was diagnosed by transvaginal ultrasonography in 38 of the patients. There were two false-negative and two false-positive results. Color flow in the trophoblastic tissue was detected in 50% of the tubal pregnancies, and the mean (+/- standard deviation) RI of the trophoblastic flows was 0.51 +/- 0.12. The RIs of the trophoblastic flows tended to decrease at higher beta-hCG levels, and 88.2% of the cases with detectable trophoblastic flow had beta-hCG above 800 mIU/mL. The average PI of the uterine arteries was 2.28 +/- 0.89. The PIs of the ipsilateral uterine arteries were significantly lower in the patients with trophoblastic flow than in those without it. CONCLUSION: By monitoring trophoblastic activity, color Doppler may differentiate between active and inactive disease and could assist in choosing the correct treatment.
PubMed ID
1448271 View in PubMed
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46 records – page 1 of 5.