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Aerobic and functional capacity in a group of healthy women: reference values and repeatability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49647
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2004 Nov;24(6):341-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Anita G M Wisén
Björn Wohlfart
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden. anita.wisen@sjukgym.lu.se
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2004 Nov;24(6):341-51
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anaerobic Threshold - physiology
Exercise Test - methods - standards
Exercise Tolerance - physiology
Exertion - physiology
Female
Humans
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Examination - methods - standards
Pulmonary Gas Exchange - physiology
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Abstract
Twenty-five randomly selected, low or moderately fit and healthy women (22-44 years) rated their perceived physical capacity and performed an incremental cycle exercise test with respiratory gas analysis. The aerobic and functional capacity did not decrease with age. However, tauVo(2) increased with age. The mean value of the perceived physical capacity was 10 metabolic equivalents and that of Vo(2max) 2075 ml min(-1). The increasing anaerobic metabolism was determined at three points DX (where the rate of Vco(2) increase just exceeds the rate of Vo(2) increase), PX (where Vco(2)/Vo(2) = 1.0) and PQ (where ventilation increase disproportionately in relation to Vco(2)). The mean Vo(2) (% of Vo(2max)) at DX, PX and PQ were 1263 (63%), 1528 (73%) and 1620 (78%) ml min(-1), respectively. The mean value of deltaVo(2)/deltaW was 10.2 ml min(-1) W(-1) while that of tauVo(2) was 0.578 (age) + 15.6. Ten women performed a test and re-test on two consecutive days, and eight of these performed another re-test 4 weeks later. The repeatability was analysed and the variations were expressed as 2 SD of the differences between the tests. The variation was greater for the 4-week re-test than the day-to-day re-test regarding Vo(2max), o(2) at DX, PX and PQ, deltaVo(2)/deltaW and HR. The variation in Vo(2max), PX and deltaVo(2)/deltaW for the 4-week re-test was more than twice that of the previously reported 4-week variation for men. The considerable variation, especially for 4-week re-testing for women should be considered when evaluating the effects of exercise and rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
15522043 View in PubMed
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[Age dependent dynamics of the critical points of physical exercise in healthy men]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49691
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2004;50(1):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
O V Korkushko
Iu T Iaroshenko
Author Affiliation
Institute of Gerontology, Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev.
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2004;50(1):39-45
Date
2004
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Anaerobic Threshold - physiology
English Abstract
Exercise Test
Exertion - physiology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pulmonary Gas Exchange - physiology
Abstract
Age dynamics of the critical points of an exercise in 240 apparently healthy men aged 18-95 years was investigated. It is shown that linear decrease of a level of critical load capacity, maximum oxygen consumption, thresholds of anaerobic exchange and decompensated metabolic acidosis takes place in aged individuals. The equations of linear regression of changes in these parameters with age are presented. Using the method of factor analysis it is demonstrated that in healthy men variability of critical points of physical activity is age-dependent. Age factor determines 58% of maximum oxygen consumption variability, 62% of decompensated metabolic acidosis variability and 51% of anaerobic exchange variability. At the same time 23% of maximum oxygen consumption variability, 26% of threshold of decompensated metabolic acidosis variability and 33% of threshold of anaerobic exchange variability depends on physical activity level.
PubMed ID
14965050 View in PubMed
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[Characteristics of changes in respiratory function of humans after a long stay in Antarctic region]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49588
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2005;51(3):25-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
I M Man'kovs'ka
Ie V Moiseienko
M P Demchenko
V Ie Dosenko
S T Zubkova
S Ia Varhatyi
T I Muzychenko
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2005;51(3):25-31
Date
2005
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological - genetics - physiology
Adult
Anoxia - blood - physiopathology
Antarctic Regions
Blood Volume - physiology
DNA-Binding Proteins - genetics
English Abstract
Exercise Test
Genotype
Hemodynamic Processes - physiology
Humans
Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1
Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit
Male
Middle Aged
Nuclear Proteins - genetics
Oxidative Stress - physiology
Oxygen - blood
Polymorphism, Genetic
Pulmonary Gas Exchange - physiology
Transcription Factors - genetics
Abstract
Fifteen participants of the Antarctic expedition (men, 27-51 years old) have been investigated after their return from a one-year stay there. All subjects have signs of latent hypoxia. Compensation of hypoxic reactions depended on the initial state of organism oxygen regimen as well as on the features of a genotype. It was supposed that, after a long stay by a person in the coastal Antarctic conditions, the latent form of hypoxia could develop. The latter was accompanied by reorganizations of oxygen regimen and determined by specific features of a genotype.
PubMed ID
16108222 View in PubMed
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Child-adult differences in the recovery from high-intensity exercise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168373
Source
Exerc Sport Sci Rev. 2006 Jul;34(3):107-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Bareket Falk
Raffy Dotan
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Education and Kinesiology, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada. bfalk@brocku.ca
Source
Exerc Sport Sci Rev. 2006 Jul;34(3):107-12
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Exercise - physiology
Heart rate
Humans
Lactic Acid - blood
Male
Ontario
Pulmonary Gas Exchange - physiology
Recovery of Function - physiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Children recover from physical exertion faster than adults, especially, from high-intensity exercise. It is argued that, qualitatively, this is due mainly to dimensional differences but that, predominantly, it is a quantitative difference, stemming from the lower relative power children can generate and from which they need to recover. Children's lesser power capacity is, in turn, likely due to maturation-dependent neuromotor differences.
PubMed ID
16829737 View in PubMed
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[Effect of background flow on the accuracy of respiratory flow and respiratory volume measurement in newborn infants]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59260
Source
Biomed Tech (Berl). 1995 Oct;40(10):282-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
B. Foitzik
G. Schmalisch
R R Wauer
Author Affiliation
Abteilung Neonatologie, Klinik und Poliklinik für Kinderheilkunde.
Source
Biomed Tech (Berl). 1995 Oct;40(10):282-8
Date
Oct-1995
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
Equipment Design
Fourier Analysis
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lung Volume Measurements - instrumentation
Pulmonary Gas Exchange - physiology
Pulmonary Ventilation - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Dead Space - physiology
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - diagnosis - physiopathology
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted - instrumentation
Ventilators, Mechanical
Abstract
Measurement of ventilation, in particular in preterm infants, is greatly impaired by equipment dead space, with its significant effect on the ventilatory pattern and gas exchange. For patients of this age, therefore, dead-spacefree methods are needed for long-term measurements. Rebreathing can be avoided if the pneumotachograph (PNT) and face mask are flushed with a continuous background flow. The effect of this on the measurements has not yet been investigated in detail. A measuring system comprising two identical baby PNTs (Jaeger/Germany) permitting a background flow of between 0 and 7 l per min was used. Spontaneous breathing was simulated with a 100 ml calibration syringe employing volumes of 20, 40, 60 and 100 ml (Rudolph/USA) and a frequency of 30 min-1. The measurements were carried out with a T-piece from a respirator circuit, a hand mask (50 ml) and a face chamber having a volume of 850 ml (Siemens-Elema/Sweden). To investigate the dynamic properties of the equipment, we employed flow jumps generated with a magnetic valve (response time
PubMed ID
8527640 View in PubMed
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Effects of a 1-yr stay at altitude on ventilation, metabolism, and work capacity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50230
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1992 Nov;73(5):1749-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1992
Author
T V Serebrovskaya
A A Ivashkevich
Author Affiliation
A.A. Bogomoletz Institute of Physiology, Kiev, Ukraine.
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1992 Nov;73(5):1749-55
Date
Nov-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Altitude
Carbon Dioxide - metabolism
Exercise Test
Humans
Hypercapnia - physiopathology
Lactates - blood
Lactic Acid
Male
Metabolism - physiology
Oxygen consumption
Physical Endurance - physiology
Pulmonary Gas Exchange - physiology
Pyruvates - blood
Pyruvic Acid
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Mechanics - physiology
Abstract
The hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory drive, gas exchange, blood lactate and pyruvate concentrations, acid-base balance, and physical working capacity were determined in three groups of healthy males: 17 residents examined at sea level (group I), 24 sea-level natives residing at 1,680-m altitude for 1 yr and examined there (group II), and 17 sea-level natives residing at 3,650-m altitude for 1 yr and examined there (group III). The piecewise linear approximation technique was used to study the ventilatory response curves, which allowed a separate analysis of slopes during the first phase of slow increase in ventilation and the second phase of sharp increase. The hypoxic ventilatory response for both isocapnic and poikilocapnic conditions was greater in group II and even greater in group III. The first signs of consciousness distortion in sea-level residents appeared at an end-tidal O2 pressure level (4.09 +/- 0.56 kPa) higher than that of temporary residents of middle (3.05 +/- 0.12) and high altitude (2.90 +/- 0.07). The hypercapnic response was also increased, although to a lesser degree. Subjects with the highest hypoxic respiratory sensitivity at high altitude demonstrated greater O2 consumption at rest, greater ventilatory response to exercise, higher physical capacity, and a less pronounced anaerobic glycolytic flux but a lower tolerance to extreme hypoxia. That is, end-tidal O2 pressure that caused a distortion of the consciousness was higher in these subjects than in those with lower hypoxic sensitivity. Two extreme types of adaptation strategy can be distinguished: active, with marked reactions of "struggle for oxygen," and passive, with reduced O2 metabolism, as well as several intermediate types.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1474047 View in PubMed
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Effects on energy expenditure of facial cooling during exercise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5325
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1991;63(5):376-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
M A Stroud
Author Affiliation
RAF Institute of Aviation Medicine, Farnborough, Hants, UK.
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1991;63(5):376-80
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body Temperature - physiology
Carbohydrate Metabolism
Cardiovascular physiology
Cold
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Exercise - physiology
Face
Humans
Lipid Metabolism
Male
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Pulmonary Gas Exchange - physiology
Respiration - physiology
Abstract
Estimated energy expenditures for men during Arctic manhauling expeditions were 29-33 MJ day-1, higher than those documented for other hard-working groups and exceeding predicted energy costs for such activities. Although physiological effects from generalised cooling were unlikely, cold exposure of the face could have influenced exercise metabolism via autonomic stimulation. This hypothesis was examined by measuring oxygen consumption, energy expenditure, respiratory exchange ratio (R) and cardiovascular changes during rest and exercise, with and without exposure of the face to air at--20 degrees C. Measurements were made in five subjects during 15 min of rest followed by continuous exercise on a cycle ergometer consisting of 15-min periods at 75, 100, 125 and 150 W external work. The cold air caused a profound fall in facial temperatures and small falls in mean skin and rectal temperatures (P less than 0.001). These changes were associated with a small increase in the mean oxygen consumption over all levels of rest and exercise (0.86 l min-1 vs 0.82 l min-1, P less than 0.001) and a corresponding increase in mean energy expenditure (294 W vs 283 W, P less than 0.05). Cold air also caused an increase in mean resting R values (1.00 vs 0.88, P less than 0.01) but a decrease in the mean R value for all levels of exercise (0.85 vs 0.91, P less than 0.05). Pulse rates were unchanged but systolic and diastolic blood pressures were relatively elevated throughout the cold face experiments (P less than 0.001).
PubMed ID
1773815 View in PubMed
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Energy cost in children assessed by multisensor activity monitors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90092
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 Mar;41(3):603-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Arvidsson Daniel
Slinde Frode
Larsson Sven
Hulthén Lena
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. daniel.arvidsson@nutrition.gu.se
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 Mar;41(3):603-11
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Calorimetry, Indirect
Carbon Dioxide - metabolism
Child
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Monitoring, Ambulatory - instrumentation
Motor Activity - physiology
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Pulmonary Gas Exchange - physiology
Rest - physiology
Sports - physiology
Abstract
PURPOSE: The SenseWear Pro2 Armband (SWA; BodyMedia, Inc., Pittsburg, PA), the Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA; Minisun LLC, Fresno, CA), and the ActiReg (AR; PreMed AS, Oslo, Norway) were compared with indirect calorimetry to determine the ability of these devices to assess energy cost in children during resting and different physical activities. METHODS: Fourteen children, 11-13 yr old, wore the SWA, the IDEEA, and the AR during resting, sitting, stationary bicycling, jumping on a trampoline, playing basketball, stair walking, and walking/running along a 50-m track. The Oxycon Mobile portable metabolic system (VIASYS Healthcare, Conshohocken, PA) was used as the criterion method for energy cost. RESULTS: For resting and sitting, the three activity monitors showed comparable results, but none of them accurately assessed energy cost for stationary bicycling, jumping on a trampoline, or playing basketball. The IDEEA was the only activity monitor that accurately assessed energy cost for stair walking. Also, the IDEEA showed a close estimate of energy cost across the walking and the running intensities, whereas the SWA accurately assessed energy cost for slow to normal walking but showed increased underestimation of energy cost with increasing speed. The AR overestimated energy cost during walking and during slow running but did not respond to increasing running speed. CONCLUSIONS: To be able to capture children's physical activity, all three activity monitors need to be further developed. Overall, the IDEEA showed the highest ability to assess energy cost in this study, but SWA may be more feasible for use in children under free-living conditions.
PubMed ID
19204590 View in PubMed
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Energy expenditure and clearing snow: a comparison of shovel and snow pusher.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215449
Source
Ergonomics. 1995 Apr;38(4):749-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
J. Smolander
V. Louhevaara
E. Ahonen
J. Polari
T. Klen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Occupational Health, Department of Physiology, Vantaa, Finland.
Source
Ergonomics. 1995 Apr;38(4):749-53
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Finland
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oxygen - physiology
Physical Exertion - physiology
Pulmonary Gas Exchange - physiology
Reference Values
Snow
Abstract
In order to assess the energy demands of manual clearing of snow, nine men did snow clearing work for 15 min with a shovel and a snow pusher. The depth of the snowcover was 400-600 mm representing a very heavy snowfall. Heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption (VO2), pulmonary ventilation (VE), respiratory exchange ratio (R), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were determined during the work tasks. HR, VE, R, and RPE were not significantly different between the shovel and snow pusher. HR averaged (+/- SD) 141 +/- 20 b min-1 with the shovel, and 142 +/- 19 beats.min-1 with the snow pusher. VO2 was 2.1 +/- 0.41.min-1 (63 +/- 12%VO2 max) in shovelling and 2.6 +/- 0.51.min-1 (75 +/- 14%VO2max) in snow pushing (p
PubMed ID
7729401 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.