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9 records – page 1 of 1.

Acute heart failure with and without concomitant acute coronary syndromes: patient characteristics, management, and survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263842
Source
J Card Fail. 2014 Oct;20(10):723-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Tuukka Tarvasmäki
Veli-Pekka Harjola
Markku S Nieminen
Krista Siirilä-Waris
Jukka Tolonen
Heli Tolppanen
Johan Lassus
Source
J Card Fail. 2014 Oct;20(10):723-30
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - complications - mortality - physiopathology
Acute Disease
Aged
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Disease Management
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Heart Failure - complications - mortality - physiopathology
Hospital Mortality
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Myocardial Revascularization - methods - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Edema - etiology
Shock, Cardiogenic - etiology
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) may precipitate up to a third of acute heart failure (AHF) cases. We assessed the characteristics, initial management, and survival of AHF patients with (ACS-AHF) and without (nACS-AHF) concomitant ACS.
Data from 620 AHF patients were analyzed in a prospective multicenter study. The ACS-AHF patients (32%) more often presented with de novo AHF (61% vs. 43%; P
PubMed ID
25079300 View in PubMed
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[Experience within hospital treatment of pulmonary edema in children following drowning in sea water]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43716
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1972 Jan-Feb;1:26-7
Publication Type
Article

Harmful effect of saline infusion in a patient with glycyrrhizic acid poisoning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143125
Source
CJEM. 2010 May;12(3):224-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Natacha Caubet-Kamar
Marie Tubery
Cyril Garrouste
Dominique Lauque
Nassim Kamar
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency, CHU Purpan, Toulouse, France.
Source
CJEM. 2010 May;12(3):224-5
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcoholism
Beverages - adverse effects
Canada
Fluid Therapy - adverse effects
Glycyrrhiza - adverse effects
Glycyrrhizic Acid - poisoning
Humans
Male
Poisoning - therapy
Pulmonary Edema - etiology
Sodium Chloride - adverse effects
Abstract
Alcohol-free licorice beverages contain glycyrrhizic acid. Excess glycyrrhizic acid is a well-known cause of excess mineralocorticoid syndrome. We report a case of glycyrrhizic acid poisoning in an abstinent alcoholic complicated by severe pulmonary edema following excessive hydration with intravenous normal saline.
PubMed ID
20522289 View in PubMed
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[High altitude medicine is a concern also for Swedish primary care. Knowledge needed to identify high risk patients and provide appropriate advice].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272998
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Olivia Kiwanuka
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Date
2015
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology
Altitude
Altitude Sickness - physiopathology - therapy
Brain Edema - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Humans
Mountaineering
Primary Health Care
Pulmonary Edema - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
With the increasing amount of people traveling to high altitude regions, the number of people at risk of acquiring altitude illness increases. Altitude illness entails three syndromes; acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral edema, and high-altitude pulmonary edema. These syndromes are potentially lethal acquired medical conditions that in most cases are preventable. Health care providers need to inform travelers of the risks associated with mountaineering and the prophylactic measures available as well as identify underlying conditions that require specific considerations. This article provides a summary of the pathophysiology, symptoms and treatment of altitude illness and aims to be an orientation for general practitioners.
PubMed ID
26010843 View in PubMed
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Incidence, time of occurence and course of complications in acute myocardinal infarction. Experiences from 332 consecutive patients treated in a full-time monitored coronary care unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55961
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1979 Aug;26(5):246-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1979
Source
Invest Cell Pathol. 1979 Jul-Sep;2(3):147-56
Publication Type
Article
Author
D. Heath
D R Williams
Source
Invest Cell Pathol. 1979 Jul-Sep;2(3):147-56
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization
Altitude
Altitude Sickness - pathology - physiopathology
Animals
Anoxia - pathology
Decompression Sickness - pathology
Humans
Hypertension, Pulmonary - etiology
Lung - pathology - physiology - ultrastructure
Pulmonary Alveoli - physiology
Pulmonary Circulation
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Pulmonary Edema - etiology
Rats
Surface Tension
Abstract
Men and mammals (excluding the indigenous mountain species) who are born at high altitude, or who ascend to live there for a long period, have to undergo acclimatization which affects virtually every system in the body. Since chronic hypoxia is the most important adverse factor in the mountain environment, the lung plays a major part in the process and shows many alterations in structure and function. However, we remain ignorant about many aspects of acclimatization of the lung to hypoxia especially at the ultrastructural level with respect to those cells whose normal function is not yet established. An account of what is known is given in this paper.
PubMed ID
521323 View in PubMed
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Lung inflammation and vascular remodeling after repeated allergen challenge detected noninvasively by MRI.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79964
Source
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2007 Mar;292(3):L644-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Tigani Bruno
Cannet Catherine
Karmouty-Quintana Harry
Blé François-Xavier
Zurbruegg Stefan
Schaeublin Elisabeth
Fozard John R
Beckmann Nicolau
Author Affiliation
Discovery Technologies Department, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Basel, Switzerland.
Source
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2007 Mar;292(3):L644-53
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - administration & dosage
Animals
Asthma - physiopathology
Bronchi - blood supply - physiopathology
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - chemistry
Capillary Permeability - drug effects
Fluorescent Dyes - diagnostic use
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Neovascularization, Pathologic - physiopathology
Ovalbumin - administration & dosage
Pulmonary Edema - etiology - physiopathology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - physiopathology
Abstract
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used previously to follow noninvasively inflammatory processes in rat acute models of lung inflammation. Here the technique was applied to a model involving repeated intratracheal administration of ovalbumin (OA). Anatomical MRI was performed at different time points with respect to a single or multiple OA challenges in Brown Norway rats actively sensitized to the allergen. Vascular permeability was assessed using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid analysis and histology were performed to validate the MRI data. The time course of MRI signals after a single OA challenge reached a maximum at 48 h and decreased significantly at 96 h. After the second and subsequent challenges, the maximum signal occurred at 6 h with a time-dependent decline over the remainder of the time course. A reduction of the inflammatory response following repeated administration of OA was also detected by BAL fluid analysis. The decrease in vascular permeability assessed by DCE-MRI in repeatedly OA-challenged rats was consistent with the thickening of the vascular wall for vessels of diameter up to 300 microm revealed by histology. Angiogenesis of vessels smaller than 30 microm was also detected histologically. These results suggest that MRI can be used to detect the inflammatory response and vascular remodeling associated with chronic airway inflammation in rat models involving repeated administration of allergen. As the contrast agent used in the DCE-MRI experiments is approved for clinical use, there is potential to translate the approach to patients.
PubMed ID
17085517 View in PubMed
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[Thromboembolic complications in ambulatory surgery. A retrospective study of 1691 patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212634
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Feb 20;116(5):615-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-1996
Author
N. Wessel
T. Gerner
Author Affiliation
Kirurgisk Avdeling, Lillehammer sykehus.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Feb 20;116(5):615-6
Date
Feb-20-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pulmonary Edema - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Thromboembolism - etiology
Thrombophlebitis - etiology
Abstract
The risk of thromboembolic complications in outpatient surgery is regarded as being low. Thromboembolic prophylaxis is seldom administered as a routine. A retrospective study in our outpatient department, based upon patients readmitted for clinical thromboembolism, showed an incidence of deep vein thrombosis of 0.05% (8/1 691) and of pulmonary embolism 0.0006% (1/1 691). None of the patients received prophylaxis for thrombosis, and all operations were performed under regional anaesthesia of the lower extremity. 50% of the operations were performed using a tourniquet. 2/3 of the patients were women and 2/3 were over the age of 50. Operation time was usually 30-45 minutes. Our study indicates that patients undergoing knee arthroscopy, and operations for varicose veins and hallux valgus are at risk of thromboembolism. Prospective studies of these risk groups are necessary to figure out the need for thrombosis prophylaxis.
PubMed ID
8658454 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.