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Association Between Interstitial Lung Abnormalities and All-Cause Mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270345
Source
JAMA. 2016 Feb 16;315(7):672-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-2016
Author
Rachel K Putman
Hiroto Hatabu
Tetsuro Araki
Gunnar Gudmundsson
Wei Gao
Mizuki Nishino
Yuka Okajima
Josée Dupuis
Jeanne C Latourelle
Michael H Cho
Souheil El-Chemaly
Harvey O Coxson
Bartolome R Celli
Isis E Fernandez
Oscar E Zazueta
James C Ross
Rola Harmouche
Raúl San José Estépar
Alejandro A Diaz
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Elías F Gudmundsson
Gudny Eiríksdottír
Thor Aspelund
Matthew J Budoff
Gregory L Kinney
John E Hokanson
Michelle C Williams
John T Murchison
William MacNee
Udo Hoffmann
Christopher J O'Donnell
Lenore J Launer
Tamara B Harrris
Vilmundur Gudnason
Edwin K Silverman
George T O'Connor
George R Washko
Ivan O Rosas
Gary M Hunninghake
Source
JAMA. 2016 Feb 16;315(7):672-81
Date
Feb-16-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - mortality
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - mortality - radiography
Pulmonary Emphysema - epidemiology - mortality
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
Interstitial lung abnormalities have been associated with lower 6-minute walk distance, diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide, and total lung capacity. However, to our knowledge, an association with mortality has not been previously investigated.
To investigate whether interstitial lung abnormalities are associated with increased mortality.
Prospective cohort studies of 2633 participants from the FHS (Framingham Heart Study; computed tomographic [CT] scans obtained September 2008-March 2011), 5320 from the AGES-Reykjavik Study (Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility; recruited January 2002-February 2006), 2068 from the COPDGene Study (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; recruited November 2007-April 2010), and 1670 from ECLIPSE (Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints; between December 2005-December 2006).
Interstitial lung abnormality status as determined by chest CT evaluation.
All-cause mortality over an approximate 3- to 9-year median follow-up time. Cause-of-death information was also examined in the AGES-Reykjavik cohort.
Interstitial lung abnormalities were present in 177 (7%) of the 2633 participants from FHS, 378 (7%) of 5320 from AGES-Reykjavik, 156 (8%) of 2068 from COPDGene, and in 157 (9%) of 1670 from ECLIPSE. Over median follow-up times of approximately 3 to 9 years, there were more deaths (and a greater absolute rate of mortality) among participants with interstitial lung abnormalities when compared with those who did not have interstitial lung abnormalities in the following cohorts: 7% vs 1% in FHS (6% difference [95% CI, 2% to 10%]), 56% vs 33% in AGES-Reykjavik (23% difference [95% CI, 18% to 28%]), and 11% vs 5% in ECLIPSE (6% difference [95% CI, 1% to 11%]). After adjustment for covariates, interstitial lung abnormalities were associated with a higher risk of death in the FHS (hazard ratio [HR], 2.7 [95% CI, 1.1 to 6.5]; P?=?.03), AGES-Reykjavik (HR, 1.3 [95% CI, 1.2 to 1.4]; P?
Notes
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PubMed ID
26881370 View in PubMed
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The Association of Lung Clearance Index with COPD and FEV1 Reduction in 'Men Born in 1914'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290716
Source
COPD. 2017 Jun; 14(3):324-329
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Suneela Zaigham
Per Wollmer
Gunnar Engström
Author Affiliation
a Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö , Lund University , Malmö , Sweden.
Source
COPD. 2017 Jun; 14(3):324-329
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Airway Obstruction - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - mortality - physiopathology
Spirometry
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Lung Clearance Index (LCI) provides an overall measurement of ventilation inhomogeneity. This population-based study examines whether LCI predicts pulmonary obstruction and incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) events over a long-term follow-up. Multiple breath nitrogen washout and spirometry were performed in 674 men from the cohort "Men born in 1914" at age 55 years. Subjects were classified into quartiles (Q) of LCI and according to LCI above and below upper limit of normal (ULN). Incidence of COPD events (COPD hospitalisations or COPD-related deaths) were monitored over the remaining life span of the men, by linkage with national hospital registers. In addition, development of pulmonary obstruction (i.e., FEV1/vital capacity below lower limit of normal (LLN)) was studied in 387 men who were re-examined with spirometry at 68 years of age. Over 44 years of follow-up, there were 85 incident COPD events. Hazards ratios (HRs) for COPD across quartiles of LCI were: Q1 1.00 (reference), Q2 1.30 (95% confidence interval: 0.61-2.74), Q3 1.97 (0.97-3.98) and Q4 3.99 (2.06-7.71) (p value for trend
PubMed ID
28453306 View in PubMed
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Associations of ambient air pollution with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease hospitalization and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116489
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2013 Apr 1;187(7):721-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2013
Author
Wen Qi Gan
J Mark FitzGerald
Chris Carlsten
Mohsen Sadatsafavi
Michael Brauer
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Health, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Great Neck, NY 11021, USA. wgan@nshs.edu
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2013 Apr 1;187(7):721-7
Date
Apr-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Particulate Matter - adverse effects
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - mortality
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Vehicle Emissions - toxicity
Abstract
Ambient air pollution has been suggested as a risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, there is a lack of longitudinal studies to support this assertion.
To investigate the associations of long-term exposure to elevated traffic-related air pollution and woodsmoke pollution with the risk of COPD hospitalization and mortality.
This population-based cohort study included a 5-year exposure period and a 4-year follow-up period. All residents aged 45-85 years who resided in Metropolitan Vancouver, Canada, during the exposure period and did not have known COPD at baseline were included in this study (n = 467,994). Residential exposures to traffic-related air pollutants (black carbon, particulate matter
PubMed ID
23392442 View in PubMed
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Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Denmark: Age-period-cohort analysis of first-time hospitalisations and deaths 1994-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287714
Source
Respir Med. 2016 May;114:78-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Jesper Lykkegaard
Gustav N Kristensen
Source
Respir Med. 2016 May;114:78-83
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Forecasting
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Predictive value of tests
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
During the 80s and 90s the mortality and number of hospitalisations due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the country of Denmark almost doubled. Since then there has been a plateau.
To analyse age, period, and cohort effects on rates of deaths and first-time hospitalisations with COPD in Denmark during the period from 1994 to 2012 and to make a forecast of these parameters.
By use of national registers, two separate age-period-cohort analyses were made, one on COPD-specific mortality rates and the other on incidence rates of first-time hospitalisations with COPD.
Both analyses found that high risk of developing severe COPD is associated with being born for women around year 1930 and for men around year 1925. The model has solid predictive ability and projections of future death- and hospitalisation rates due to COPD were made.
Long-term cohort effects rather than present exposure and treatment explain the recent rise and fall in the epidemic of COPD in Denmark. In the near future ageing of birth cohorts with lower COPD-specific mortality and hospitalisation rates will most likely lead to a substantial decrease in severe COPD in Denmark. However, rising trends for cohorts born after year 1948 calls for concern.
PubMed ID
27109815 View in PubMed
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COPD death rates: projecting a female trajectory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181688
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Feb 3;170(3):334
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-3-2004
Author
Erica Weir
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Feb 3;170(3):334
Date
Feb-3-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mortality - trends
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Sex Factors
Smoking Cessation
Notes
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1999 Jun;13(6):1267-7510445600
Cites: Can Respir J. 2003 May-Jun;10 Suppl A:11A-65A12861361
Cites: Can Respir J. 2003 May-Jun;10(4):183-512889491
PubMed ID
14757666 View in PubMed
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The effectiveness gap in COPD: a mixed methods international comparative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115040
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2013 Jun;22(2):209-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Nick Bosanquet
Lucy Dean
Irina Iordachescu
Colm Sheehy
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, London, UK. n.bosanquet@imperial.ac.uk
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2013 Jun;22(2):209-13
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Health Policy
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Primary Health Care - methods
Program Evaluation
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There has been a large increase in treatment and in research on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) from the common starting point of the original Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) study. There is currently little evidence on the degree of similarity and difference between national programmes or on the linkage between research and policy.
To review the evidence on programme development and the effectiveness gap from the UK, France, Germany, and Finland.
Visits and literature reviews were undertaken for regional centres in Lancashire, Nord-Pas de Calais, and Finland, and Eurostat data on mortality and hospital discharges were analysed, and telephone interviews in Nord-Rhein Westphalia.
There have been very significant differences in programme development from the original GOLD starting point. The UK has national strategies but they are without consistent local delivery. The French Affection de Longue Durée (ALD) programme limits special help to at most 10% of patients and there is little use of spirometry in primary care. Germany has a more general Disease Management Programme with COPD as a late starter. Finland has had a successful 10-year programme. The results for the effectiveness gap on hospital discharges show a major difference between Finland (40.7% fall in discharges) and others (increases of 6.0-43.7%).
The results show the need for a simpler programme in primary care to close the effectiveness gap. Such a programme is outlined based on preventing the downward spiral for high-risk patients.
PubMed ID
23549383 View in PubMed
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Influence of relatively low level of particulate ar pollution on hospitalization for COPD in elderly people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181833
Source
Inhal Toxicol. 2004 Jan;16(1):21-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Yue Chen
Qiuying Yang
Daniel Krewski
Yuanli Shi
Richard T Burnett
Kimberly McGrail
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine and McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ychen@uottawa.ca
Source
Inhal Toxicol. 2004 Jan;16(1):21-5
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects
British Columbia - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - mortality
Risk assessment
Abstract
To assess the association between relatively low levels of size-fractioned particulate matter (PM) and hospitalization for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we conducted a time-series analysis among elderly people 65 yr of age or more living in Vancouver between June 1995 and March 1999. Measures of thoracic PM (PM(10)), fine PM (PM(2.5)), coarse PM (PM(10-2.5)), and coefficient of haze (COH) were examined over periods varying from 1 to 7 days prior to hospital admissions. Generalized additive models (GAMs; general linear models, GLMs) were used, and temporal trends and seasonal and subseasonal cycles in COPD hospitalizations were removed by using GLM with parametric natural cubic splines. The relative risks were calculated based on an incremental exposure corresponding to the interquartile range of these measures, and were adjusted for daily weather conditions and gaseous pollutants. PM measures had a positive effect on COPD hospitalization, especially 0 to 2 days prior to the admissions, before copollutants were accounted for. For 3-day average levels of exposure the relative risk estimates were 1.13 (95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.21) for PM(10), 1.08 (1.02-1.15) for PM(2.5), 1.09 (1.03-1.16) for PM(10-2.5), and 1.05 (1.01-1.09) for COH. The associations were no longer significant when NO(2) was included in the models. We concluded that the particle-related measures were significantly associated with COPD hospitalization in the Vancouver area, where the level of air pollution is relatively low, but the effects were not independent of other air pollutants.
PubMed ID
14744661 View in PubMed
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Outcomes following chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presentations to emergency departments in Alberta: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138569
Source
Can Respir J. 2010 Nov-Dec;17(6):295-300
Publication Type
Article
Author
Brian H Rowe
Donald C Voaklander
Thomas J Marrie
Ambikaipakan Senthilselvan
Terry P Klassen
Rhonda J Rosychuk
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.
Source
Can Respir J. 2010 Nov-Dec;17(6):295-300
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex, multisystem disorder that often results in exacerbations requiring emergency department (ED) management. Following an exacerbation and discharge from the ED, reassessment and management adjustment with a health care provider are recommended to re-establish control of the disease.
To describe outcomes of all COPD presentations to EDs made by adults in Alberta including the time spent in the ED and the physician visits following the ED visit.
Provincial administrative databases were used to obtain all ED encounters for COPD during six fiscal years (1999 to 2005). The information extracted included demographics, ED visit timing, and acute and subacute outcomes (physician visits up to 365 days after discharge for all 7302 discharged individuals during a one-year period). Data analysis included descriptive summaries and survival curves.
There were 85,330 ED visits for acute COPD, of which 67% were discharged from the ED. Median ED length of stay was longer in large urban areas (Calgary: 5 h 9 min; Edmonton: 4 h 58 min) than in other regions of Alberta (1 h 17 min). Admissions resulted from 32% of visits and varied among regions; however, few were admitted to the intensive care unit (1%) or died (0.1%). Following discharge, the median time to first follow-up with a physician was 13 days; however, only 40% of patients had follow-up visits in the first seven days. Repeat ED visits within seven days occurred in 5.7% of discharged patients, while 25.6% of discharged patients had repeat ED visits within 365 days of discharge.
More than 30% of COPD ED visits resulted in admission; regional variation was significant. Moreover, discharged patients experienced delayed follow-up and often required repeat ED visits. Interventions to improve reassessment and reduce COPD-related repeat ED visits should be explored.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21165352 View in PubMed
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A Scandinavian audit of hospitalizations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144496
Source
Respir Med. 2010 Sep;104(9):1304-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Erik Dyb Liaaen
Anne H Henriksen
Nikolai Stenfors
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Aalesund Hospital, Aalesund, Norway.
Source
Respir Med. 2010 Sep;104(9):1304-9
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Disease Progression
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Mortality
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medical Audit
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - mortality
Quality of Health Care - standards
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In Scandinavia no large audits of hospitalizations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been performed, and data on adherence to national guidelines are scarce. The aims of the present study were to audit hospitalizations for COPD exacerbations in three Scandinavian hospitals with respect to incidence, patient population and standards of hospital care. Retrospectively all hospitalizations in the Departments of Internal and Respiratory Medicine in Ostersund Hospital (Sweden), Aalesund Hospital (Norway) and Trondheim University Hospital (Norway) from Jan 1 to Dec 31, 2005, with discharge ICD-10 diagnoses J43-J44, J96 + J44 or J13-18 + j44 were registered. A total of 1144 admissions (731 patients) were identified from patient administrative systems and medical charts. Among the admitted patients 27% were >80 years old, >50% had COPD stage III or IV, and 14% had respiratory acidosis at admittance. Patients with 3 or more admissions (13%) during 2005 accounted for 36% of all hospitalizations. One third of the patients were current smokers. Non-invasive ventilation was used in 14% of the admissions, with large variation between centres. In-hospital mortality was 3.7%. In this first large Scandinavian audit of COPD-hospitalizations, all centres had low in-hospital mortality. We consider this as an indication of good clinical practice in the three studied centres and possibly due to the frequent use of non-invasive ventilation.
PubMed ID
20363605 View in PubMed
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Social position and mortality from respiratory diseases in males and females.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67329
Source
Eur Respir J. 2003 May;21(5):821-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
E. Prescott
N. Godtfredsen
J. Vestbo
M. Osler
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Centre for Prospective Population Studies, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre at the Institute of Preventive Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. eva.prescott@dadlnet.dk
Source
Eur Respir J. 2003 May;21(5):821-6
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lung Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Although social differences in respiratory diseases are considerable, few studies have focused on this disease entity using mortality as an outcome. Does mortality from respiratory disease, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) differ with social position measured by education, income, housing and employment grade? The study population consisted of 26,392 males and females from pooling of two population studies in the Copenhagen area. Data was linked with information from social registers in Statistics Denmark. The relationship between socioeconomic factors and risk of death from respiratory disease and COPD was assessed with an average duration of follow-up of 12 yrs. Education was strongly associated with respiratory mortality in both sexes. The association was stronger in later birth cohorts comparing the highest level of education (>11 yrs) with the lowest (
PubMed ID
12765428 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.