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ß2-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms, asthma and COPD: two large population-based studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129736
Source
Eur Respir J. 2012 Mar;39(3):558-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
M. Thomsen
B G Nordestgaard
A A Sethi
A. Tybjærg-Hansen
M. Dahl
Author Affiliation
Dept of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2012 Mar;39(3):558-66
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asthma - epidemiology - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gene Frequency
Humans
Incidence
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prevalence
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - genetics
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2 - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
The ß(2)-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) is an important regulator of airway smooth muscle tone. We tested the hypothesis that three functional polymorphisms in the ADRB2 gene (Thr164Ile, Gly16Arg and Gln27Glu) are associated with reduced lung function, asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We first genotyped 8,971 individuals from the Copenhagen City Heart Study for all three polymorphisms. To validate our findings, we genotyped an additional 53,777 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study for the Thr164Ile polymorphism. We identified 60,910 Thr164Ile noncarriers, 1,822 heterozygotes and 16 homozygotes. In the Copenhagen City Heart Study, the Thr164Ile genotype was associated with reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) % predicted (trend p = 0.01) and FEV(1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) (p = 0.001): Thr164Ile heterozygotes had 3% and 2% reduced FEV(1) % pred and FEV(1)/FVC, respectively, compared with noncarriers. The odds ratio for COPD in Thr164Ile heterozygotes was 1.46 (95% CI 1.05-2.02). In the Copenhagen General Population Study, the Thr164 genotype associated with reduced FEV(1) % pred (p = 0.04) and FEV(1)/FVC (p
PubMed ID
22075484 View in PubMed
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Acute effects of particulate air pollution on respiratory admissions: results from APHEA 2 project. Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15434
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2001
Author
R W Atkinson
H R Anderson
J. Sunyer
J. Ayres
M. Baccini
J M Vonk
A. Boumghar
F. Forastiere
B. Forsberg
G. Touloumi
J. Schwartz
K. Katsouyanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, St. George's Hospital Medical School, London, United Kingdom. atkinson@sghms.ac.uk
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Date
Nov-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
England - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Italy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Ozone - adverse effects - analysis
Particle Size
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Population Surveillance
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Spain - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Weather
Abstract
The APHEA 2 project investigated short-term health effects of particles in eight European cities. In each city associations between particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microm (PM(10)) and black smoke and daily counts of emergency hospital admissions for asthma (0-14 and 15-64 yr), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and all-respiratory disease (65+ yr) controlling for environmental factors and temporal patterns were investigated. Summary PM(10) effect estimates (percentage change in mean number of daily admissions per 10 microg/m(3) increase) were asthma (0-14 yr) 1.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 2.3), asthma (15-64 yr) 1.1% (0.3, 1.8), and COPD plus asthma and all-respiratory (65+ yr) 1.0% (0.4, 1.5) and 0.9% (0.6, 1.3). The combined estimates for Black Smoke tended to be smaller and less precisely estimated than for PM(10). Variability in the sizes of the PM(10) effect estimates between cities was also investigated. In the 65+ groups PM(10) estimates were positively associated with annual mean concentrations of ozone in the cities. For asthma admissions (0-14 yr) a number of city-specific factors, including smoking prevalence, explained some of their variability. This study confirms that particle concentrations in European cities are positively associated with increased numbers of admissions for respiratory diseases and that some of the variation in PM(10) effect estimates between cities can be explained by city characteristics.
PubMed ID
11734437 View in PubMed
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Adult respiratory outcomes of extreme preterm birth. A regional cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268379
Source
Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2015 Mar;12(3):313-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Maria Vollsæter
Hege H Clemm
Emma Satrell
Geir E Eide
Ola D Røksund
Trond Markestad
Thomas Halvorsen
Source
Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2015 Mar;12(3):313-22
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Forecasting
Humans
Infant, Extremely Premature
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology
Lung
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Retrospective Studies
Spirometry
Total lung capacity
Young Adult
Abstract
Lifetime respiratory function after extremely preterm birth (gestational age=28 wk or birth weight=1,000 g) is unknown.
To compare changes from 18-25 years of age in respiratory health, lung function, and airway responsiveness in young adults born extremely prematurely to that of term-born control subjects.
Comprehensive lung function investigations and interviews were conducted in a population-based sample of 25-year-old subjects born extremely prematurely in western Norway in 1982-1985, and in matched term-born control subjects. Comparison was made to similar data collected at 18 years of age.
At 25 years of age, 46/51 (90%) eligible subjects born extremely prematurely and 39/46 (85%) control subjects participated. z-Scores for FEV1, forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of vital capacity, and FEV1/FVC were significantly reduced in subjects born extremely prematurely by 1.02, 1.26, and 0.88, respectively, and airway resistance (kPa/L/s) was increased (0.23 versus 0.18). Residual volume to total lung capacity increased with severity of neonatal bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Responsiveness to methacholine (dose-response slope; 3.16 versus 0.85) and bronchial lability index (7.5 versus 4.8%) were increased in subjects born extremely prematurely. Lung function changes from 18 to 25 years and respiratory symptoms were similar in the prematurely born and term-born groups.
Lung function in early adult life was in the normal range in the majority of subjects born extremely prematurely, but methacholine responsiveness was more pronounced than in term-born young adults, suggesting a need for ongoing pulmonary monitoring in this population.
PubMed ID
25616079 View in PubMed
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[Age and gender aspect of epidemiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146394
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2010;23(4):630-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2010;23(4):630-5
Date
2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Educational Status
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
The research presents the authors' analysis of epidemiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a big industrial city of Middle Volga. 2063 persons (903 men and 1160 women) were examined in four age groups (30-39 years, 40-49 years, 50-59 years, 60 years and upward) in Kirovskiy and Krasnoglinskiy districts of Samara. COPD was found out in 14,49% among 2063 examined people (30-39 years--10.76%, 40-49 years--10.89%, 50-59 years--15.88%, 60 years and upward--21.30%). COPD was found out in 18.72% among 903 examined men and in 11.21% among 1160 examined women. The data proved that leading risk factors of COPD are male sex, age, smoking, ecology, genetic predisposition, level of the education, marriage status.
PubMed ID
21510089 View in PubMed
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Age and sex variations in hospital readmissions for COPD associated with overall and cardiac comorbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152146
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2009 Mar;13(3):394-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Y. Chen
Q. Li
H. Johansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ychen@uottawa.ca
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2009 Mar;13(3):394-9
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Diseases - epidemiology
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology
Pulmonary Heart Disease - epidemiology
Registries
Abstract
To determine sex and age variations in hospital readmissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) associated with overall and cardiac comorbid conditions.
A one-year follow-up study was conducted for 108 726 COPD in-patients aged >or=40 years who were discharged alive after their first admission in the 1999-2000 fiscal year.
Within a year, 38 955 of the patients were readmitted to hospital for COPD. The incidence rate of COPD readmission was 49.1% per year. It was higher for men than women aged >or=70 years, but was almost the same for patients aged
PubMed ID
19275803 View in PubMed
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[Age peculiarities of clinical course of occupational chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130895
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2011;24(2):319-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
O N Bachinskii
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2011;24(2):319-24
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols - adverse effects
Age Factors
Aging
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The article is devoted to analysis of the problem of lung diseases due to industrial dust exposure in Kursk region and to studying the clinical features of the most widespread occupational respiratory disease--occupational chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, among patients of various age groups. It is shown that the development of dust-induced bronchoobstructive diseases provokes infringement of physiological lungs aging and in clinical course of the disease in elderly and senile age has its features.
PubMed ID
21957595 View in PubMed
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All Danish first-time COPD hospitalisations 2002-2008: incidence, outcome, patients, and care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129368
Source
Respir Med. 2012 Apr;106(4):549-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Jesper Lykkegaard
Jens Søndergaard
Jakob Kragstrup
Jesper Rømhild Davidsen
Thomas Knudsen
Morten Andersen
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of General Practice, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, J. B. Winsløws Vej 9A, 1, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark. jlykkegaard@health.sdu.dk
Source
Respir Med. 2012 Apr;106(4):549-56
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bed Occupancy - statistics & numerical data - trends
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospital Mortality - trends
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Incidence
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate trends in first-time hospitalisations with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a publicly financed healthcare system during the period from 2002 to 2008 with respect to incidence, outcome and characteristics of hospitalisations, departments, and patients.
Using health administrative data from national registers, all first-time hospitalisations with COPD in Denmark (population 5.4 million) were identified. Data based on the individual hospitalisations and patients were retrieved and analysed.
During the period 2002 to 2008 the total rate of COPD hospitalisations decreased from 460 to 410 per 100,000 person years. Among persons above 45 years of age, the age- and sex-adjusted incidence rate of first-time COPD hospitalisations decreased by 8.2% (95% CI 5.0-11.2%). The inpatient mortality increased OR 1.16 (95% CI 1.01-1.34) and the one-year mortality increased OR 1.12 (95% CI 1.03-1.21). Concurrently, significant age- and sex-adjusted increases were found in use of intensive care, comorbidity, patient travel distance, bed occupancy rate of the receiving department, prior use of oral and inhaled corticosteroids, use of outpatient clinics and encounters in general practice, while length of stay and number of receiving hospitals decreased.
Decreasing rate of first-time COPD hospitalisations combined with shorter lengths of stay and increasing severity of cases indicates that the use of hospital beds for COPD exacerbations has been gradually restricted. This may be causally related to both the centralisation into overcrowded departments and the improved outside hospital treatment of COPD, also demonstrated in this study.
PubMed ID
22115929 View in PubMed
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Altitude-related hypoxia: risk assessment and management for passengers on commerical aircraft.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183594
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2003 Sep;74(9):922-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Amir Mortazavi
Mark J Eisenberg
David Langleben
Pierre Ernst
Renee L Schiff
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2003 Sep;74(9):922-7
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine
Altitude Sickness - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Aviation - organization & administration
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Cystic Fibrosis - epidemiology
Humans
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Risk Management
Abstract
Individuals with pulmonary and cardiac disorders are particularly at risk of developing hypoxemia at altitude. Our objective is to describe the normal and maladaptive physiological responses to altitude-related hypoxia, to review existing methods and guidelines for preflight assessment of air travelers, and to provide recommendations for treatment of hypoxia at altitude.
Falling partial pressure of oxygen with altitude results in a number of physiologic adaptations including hyperventilation, pulmonary vasoconstriction, altered ventilation/perfusion matching, and increased sympathetic tone. According to three guideline statements, the arterial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) should be maintained above 50 to 55 mm Hg at all altitudes. General indicators such as oxygen saturation and sea level blood gases may be useful in predicting altitude hypoxia. More specialized techniques for estimation of altitude PaO2, such as regression equations, hypoxia challenge testing, and hypobaric chamber exposure have also been examined. A regression equation using sea level PaO2 and spirometric parameters can be used to estimate PaO2 at altitude. Hypoxia challenge testing, performed by exposing subjects to lower inspired FIO2 at sea level may be more precise. Hypobaric chamber exposure, the gold standard, mimics lower barometric pressure, but is mainly used in research.
Oxygen supplementation during air travel is needed for individuals with an estimated PaO2 (8000 ft) below 50 mmHg. There are a number of guidelines for the pre-flight assessment of patients with pulmonary and/or cardiac diseases. However, these data are based on small studies in patients with a limited group of diseases.
PubMed ID
14503669 View in PubMed
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An international study of hospital readmissions and related utilization in Europe and the USA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189481
Source
Health Policy. 2002 Sep;61(3):269-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Gert P Westert
Ronald J Lagoe
Ilmo Keskimäki
Alastair Leyland
Mark Murphy
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, RIVM (CZO), PO Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands. gert.westert@rivm.nl
Source
Health Policy. 2002 Sep;61(3):269-78
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - utilization
Asthma - epidemiology - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - therapy
Diagnosis-Related Groups - classification
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Services Research
Heart Failure - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - therapy
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Scotland - epidemiology
Stroke - epidemiology - therapy
United States - epidemiology
Utilization Review
Abstract
This study concerns a comparative analysis of hospital readmission rates and related utilization in six areas, including three European countries (Finland, Scotland and the Netherlands) and three states in the USA (New York, California, Washington State). It includes a data analysis on six major causes of hospitalization across these areas. Its main focus is on two questions. (1) Do hospital readmission rates vary among the causes of hospitalization and the study populations? (2) Are hospital inpatient lengths of stay inversely related to readmissions rates? The study demonstrated that diagnoses such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and congestive heart failure (CHF) were the major causes of hospital readmission rates. The data showed that (initial) hospital stays were generally longer for patients who were readmitted than for those who were not. As a result, short stays were not associated with a higher risk of readmission, meaning that hospital readmissions were not produced by premature hospital discharges in the study population. Furthermore, the spatial variation in readmission rates within 7 versus 8-30 days showed to be identical. Finally, it was found that countries or states with relatively shorter stays showed higher readmission rates and vice versa. Since patients with readmissions in all of the areas had on average longer initial stays, this finding at country level does illustrate that there seems to be a country specific trade off between length of stay and rate of readmission. An explanation should be sought in differences in health care arrangements per area, including factors that determine length of stay levels and readmission rates in individual countries (e.g. managed care penetration, after care by GP's or home care).
PubMed ID
12098520 View in PubMed
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Antimicrobial peptide levels are linked to airway inflammation, bacterial colonisation and exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290091
Source
Eur Respir J. 2017 Mar; 49(3):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Louise J P Persson
Marianne Aanerud
Jon A Hardie
Roy Miodini Nilsen
Per S Bakke
Tomas M Eagan
Pieter S Hiemstra
Author Affiliation
Dept of Thoracic Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway louise.persson@med.uib.no.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2017 Mar; 49(3):
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Biomarkers - analysis
Case-Control Studies
Cathelicidins - analysis
Cohort Studies
Cytokines - analysis
Disease Progression
Female
Haemophilus Infections - epidemiology
Humans
Inflammation
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Proportional Hazards Models
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - physiopathology
Secretory Leukocyte Peptidase Inhibitor - analysis
Sputum - chemistry
Vitamin D - blood
Abstract
Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effectors of host defence against infection, inflammation and wound repair. We aimed to study AMP levels in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and during acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD), and to examine their relation to clinical parameters and inflammatory markers.The 3-year Bergen COPD Cohort Study included 433 COPD patients and 325 controls. Induced sputum was obtained and analysed for levels of the AMPs human cathelicidin (hCAP18/LL-37) and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and for the inflammatory markers interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) using immunoassays. Systemic hCAP18/LL-37 and vitamin D levels were also studied. Treating AMPs as response variables, non-parametric tests were applied for univariate comparison, and linear regression to obtain adjusted estimates. The risk of AECOPD was assessed by Cox proportional-hazard regression.Sputum AMP levels were higher in patients with stable COPD (n=215) compared to controls (n=45), and further changed during AECOPD (n=56), with increased hCAP18/LL-37 and decreased SLPI levels. Plasma hCAP18/LL-37 levels showed a similar pattern. In stable COPD, high sputum hCAP18/LL-37 levels were associated with increased risk of AECOPD, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae colonisation, higher age, ex-smoking and higher levels of inflammatory markers.Altered levels of selected AMPs are linked to airway inflammation, infection and AECOPD, suggesting a role for these peptides in airway defence mechanisms in COPD.
PubMed ID
28298400 View in PubMed
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193 records – page 1 of 20.