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Adjustments in cardiorespiratory function after pneumonectomy: results of the pneumonectomy project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138536
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2011 Jan;141(1):7-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Jean Deslauriers
Paula Ugalde
Santiago Miro
Sylvie Ferland
Sébastien Bergeron
Yves Lacasse
Steve Provencher
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic Surgery, Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Quebec, Canada. jean.deslauriers@chg.ulaval.ca
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2011 Jan;141(1):7-15
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Aged
Atrial Function, Right
Blood pressure
Chi-Square Distribution
Dyspnea - etiology - physiopathology
Echocardiography, Doppler
Exercise Test
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Heart - physiopathology
Humans
Hypertension, Pulmonary - etiology - physiopathology
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Lung - physiopathology - surgery
Lung Neoplasms - mortality - physiopathology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Pulmonary Artery - physiopathology
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Pulmonary Gas Exchange
Quebec
Recovery of Function
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Function, Left
Ventricular Function, Right
Vital Capacity
Abstract
To assess lung function, gas exchange, exercise capacity, and right-sided heart hemodynamics, including pulmonary artery pressure, in patients long term after pneumonectomy.
Among 523 consecutive patients who underwent pneumonectomy for lung cancer between January 1992 and September 2001, 117 were alive in 2006 and 100 were included in the study. During a 1-day period, each patient had complete medical history, chest radiographs, pulmonary function studies, resting arterial blood gas analysis, 6-minute walk test, and Doppler echocardiography.
Most patients (N = 73) had no or only minimal dyspnea. On the basis of predicted values, functional losses in forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity were 38% ± 18% and 31% ± 24%, respectively, and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity decreased by 31% ± 18%. There was a significant correlation between preoperative and postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (P
PubMed ID
21168011 View in PubMed
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Allergic alveolitis in Swedish farmers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50347
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 1989;94(3):271-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
A. Rask-Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 1989;94(3):271-85
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alveolitis, Extrinsic Allergic - epidemiology - physiopathology
Antibodies, Fungal - analysis
Farmer's Lung - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Smoking - immunology
Sweden
Vital Capacity
Abstract
Allergic alveolitis due to mold dust inhalation in farmers is a severe but rare disease in Scandinavia. In this report 38 cases of the disease are presented. There were 31 men and 7 women, with mean ages of 46 and 38 years respectively. Strict diagnostic criteria were used, resulting in 21 definite, 12 probable and 5 possible cases. None of the patients were current smokers, but 10 of the men were ex-smokers. The great majority of the patients fell ill between October and April. The symptoms were dyspnea, cough, fatigue, episodes of fever, and in some cases loss of weight. The average duration of the disease was 6 months. The moldy material most commonly associated with the disease was straw, followed by hay, grain, and wood chips. For those tested serum lactate dehydrogenase was raised in 80% and the mean value for PaO2 was 7.8 kPa. Precipitating antibodies to mold antigens were positive in 68%. In general, pulmonary function tests showed a restrictive pattern. Over half of the patients still had dyspnea on exercise after recovery. Three fourths of the patients were treated with antibiotics and thus clearly had been misjudged as having an infection.
PubMed ID
2609470 View in PubMed
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Applicability of the single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity in a Norwegian Community Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15695
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Dec;158(6):1745-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
I. Welle
G E Eide
P. Bakke
A. Gulsvik
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Ida.welle@meda.uib.no
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Dec;158(6):1745-50
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Asthma - physiopathology
Carbon Monoxide - diagnostic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Forecasting
Humans
Inspiratory Capacity - physiology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational Exposure
Patient Selection
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity - physiology
Pulmonary Emphysema - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Respiration
Smoking - physiopathology
Time Factors
Vital Capacity - physiology
Abstract
The test of single-breath diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) has been widely used in population surveys. However, little is known about the effect of meeting or failing to meet the criteria for acceptability of this test. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) recommends a breathholding time of 9 to 11 s, two measurements within +/- 10% or 3 ml CO(STPD)/min/mm Hg of the average DLCO, and an inspiratory vital capacity (IVC) of at least 90% of the largest previously measured forced vital capacity (FVC) as criteria for this test. The objective of the present study was to examine the extent to which these criteria were met in a community study. To do this, a random sample of 3,740 persons, aged 15 to 70 yr, of the general population of the city of Bergen and 11 surrounding municipalities on the southwest coast of Norway were enrolled in a two-phase cross-sectional study. In the second phase, a stratified sample (n = 1,512) of the respondents to the postal questionnaire used for recruitment for the study (n = 3,370) were invited to a clinical and respiratory physiologic examination that included the DLCO test. The attendance rate was 84% (1,275 of 1,512). In the examination, all subjects were able to maintain a breathholding time of 9 to 11 s, and 98% had two DLCO values within +/- 10% or 3 ml CO(STPD)/min/mm Hg of the average DLCO. The criterion of an IVC of at least 90% of FVC in the two tests was met by 68% of the subjects. Younger age was an independent predictor of failure to meet the required criteria. Thus, only two-thirds of the participants fulfilled all of the ATS criteria for the DLCO test, the main reason for failure being an IVC of less than 90% FVC. This should not necessarily lead to the exclusion from further analysis of those failing to meet this criterion.
PubMed ID
9847262 View in PubMed
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Association between pulmonary function and peak oxygen uptake in elderly: the Generation 100 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274398
Source
Respir Res. 2015;16:156
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Erlend Hassel
Dorthe Stensvold
Thomas Halvorsen
Ulrik Wisløff
Arnulf Langhammer
Sigurd Steinshamn
Source
Respir Res. 2015;16:156
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - physiology
Exercise Test
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Linear Models
Lung - physiology
Male
Norway
Oxygen consumption
Predictive value of tests
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Sex Factors
Spirometry
Abstract
Although reduced function of the respiratory system limits peak oxygen uptake in diseases affecting the lungs or airways, the healthy respiratory system is thought to have a spare capacity for oxygen transport and uptake, and is not considered a limiting factor for peak oxygen uptake in healthy people. However, lung function declines with age and could theoretically limit peak oxygen uptake in elderly. We examined the association between peak oxygen uptake and lung function indices in an elderly population with the hypothesis that lung function indices would be associated with VO2peak up to a threshold value situated above the lower limits of normal lung function for our population.
Spirometry, gas diffusion tests and incremental work tests were performed in 1443 subjects (714 women) aged 69-77 years. Association between lung function indices and peak oxygen uptake was studied with hockey-stick regression.
Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) had a positive association with peak oxygen uptake up to, but not above, a threshold value of 2.86 l for men, and 2.13 l for women (lower limit of normal 2.73 and 1.77 l respectively). A corresponding threshold was found for diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) for men at 9.18 mmol/min/kPa (lower limit of normal 6.84 mmol/min/kPa). DLCO for women and DLCO divided by alveolar volume (DLCO/VA) for both sexes had a significant linear relationship to VO2peak (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
26715058 View in PubMed
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Associations between lung function and alcohol consumption--assessed by both a questionnaire and a blood marker.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258350
Source
Respir Med. 2014 Jan;108(1):114-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
S. Frantz
P. Wollmer
M. Dencker
G. Engström
U. Nihlén
Author Affiliation
Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. Electronic address: sophia.frantz@med.lu.se.
Source
Respir Med. 2014 Jan;108(1):114-21
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Biological Markers - blood
Bronchitis, Chronic - physiopathology
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Plethysmography, Whole Body
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - blood - physiopathology
Pulmonary Emphysema - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Transferrin - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Abstract
Studies on the influence of alcohol consumption on lung function have shown conflicting results. Self-reported alcohol consumption may be inaccurate. This study used both a validated alcohol questionnaire and a blood marker of heavy alcohol consumption, and examined potential associations with different lung physiological variables.
The study population (450 subjects) answered an alcohol questionnaire (AUDIT-C) and performed spirometry, body plethysmography and a test for diffusing capacity for CO (DL,CO). Carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT), a clinically used blood marker for identifying heavy alcohol consumption, and C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of systemic inflammation were analysed.
Using AUDIT-C, 407 subjects were alcohol drinkers and 29 non-drinkers. Of the alcohol drinkers, 224 subjects were "hazardous drinkers" and 183 "moderate drinkers". Thirty-four subjects had a CDT =2.0% (=heavy drinkers). There was no difference in lung function between hazardous and moderate drinkers. Heavy drinkers had lower DL,CO (74% vs 83% PN, p = 0.003), more symptoms of chronic bronchitis (p = 0.001) and higher AUDIT-C scores (p 
PubMed ID
24064346 View in PubMed
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Atherosclerotic plaques in the internal carotid artery and associations with lung function assessed by different methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127425
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Mar;32(2):120-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Sophia Frantz
Ulf Nihlén
Magnus Dencker
Gunnar Engström
Claes-Göran Löfdahl
Per Wollmer
Author Affiliation
Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. sophia.frantz@med.lu.se
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Mar;32(2):120-5
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Carotid Artery Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery, Internal - ultrasonography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Plaque, Atherosclerotic - epidemiology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Plethysmography, Whole Body
Predictive value of tests
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Smoking - epidemiology
Spirometry
Sweden - epidemiology
Vital Capacity
Abstract
Previous studies on associations between reduced lung function and cardiovascular disease (CVD) have mainly been based on forced expiratory volume in 1-s (FEV(1) ) and vital capacity (VC). This study examined potential associations between five different lung function variables and plaques in the internal carotid artery (ICA).
Subjects (n = 450) from a previous population-based respiratory questionnaire survey [current smokers without lower respiratory symptoms, subjects with a self-reported diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and never-smokers without lower respiratory symptoms] were examined using spirometry, body plethysmography and measurements of diffusing capacity for CO (D(L,CO) ). Plaques in the ICA were assessed by ultrasonography.
Two hundred and twenty subjects were current smokers, 139 ex-smokers and 89 never-smokers. COPD was diagnosed in 130 subjects (GOLD criteria). Plaques in the ICA were present in 231 subjects (52%). General linear analysis with adjustment for established risk factors for atherosclerosis, including C-reactive protein, showed that D(L,CO) was lower [77.4% versus 83.7% of predicted normal (PN), P = 0.014] and residual volume (RV) was higher (110.3% versus 104.8% of PN, P = 0.020) in subjects with than without plaques in the ICA. This analysis did not show any statistically significant association between plaques and FEV(1) or VC.
The occurrence of plaques in the ICA was associated with low D(L,CO) and high RV, but not significantly with FEV(1) or COPD status. The results suggest that the relationships between reduced lung function, COPD and CVD are complex and not only linked to bronchial obstruction and low-grade systemic inflammation.
PubMed ID
22296632 View in PubMed
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Changes in lung function of HIV-infected patients: a 4.5-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123634
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Jul;32(4):288-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Ulrik Sloth Kristoffersen
Anne-Mette Lebech
Jann Mortensen
Jan Gerstoft
Henrik Gutte
Andreas Kjaer
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine & PET, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. ulriksk@sund.ku.dk
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Jul;32(4):288-95
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Retroviral Agents - therapeutic use
Denmark
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
HIV Infections - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology - virology
Humans
Lung - physiopathology - virology
Lung Volume Measurements
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology - virology
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Vital Capacity
Abstract
To investigate the development of lung function in HIV-infected patients.
In a prospective cohort study, 88 HIV-infected patients had a lung function test performed and 63 patients (72%) had their LFT repeated with a median follow-up period of 4.4 years. Forty-eight per cent were smokers, and at the re-examination, 97% were on combination antiretroviral therapy.
Carbon monoxide diffusion capacity was reduced and decreased over time in both smokers and non-smokers. Alveolar volume decreased and forced vital capacity increased similarly in both smokers and non-smokers. No changes were observed in forced expiratory volume or peak flow, but smokers had reduced values compared with those of the non-smokers at both examinations. FEV1/FVC was reduced especially in smokers and declined in both smokers and non-smokers.
Carbon monoxide diffusion capacity is reduced in HIV-infected patients and seems to decline over time. Additionally, signs of obstructive lung disease are present in HIV-infected patients and seem to increase over time, although only modestly.
PubMed ID
22681606 View in PubMed
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Circulating nitric oxide products do not solely reflect nitric oxide release in cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133052
Source
Liver Int. 2011 Oct;31(9):1381-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Pia Afzelius
Nassim Bazeghi
Peter Bie
Flemming Bendtsen
Jørgen Vestbo
Søren Møller
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hvidovre Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Liver Int. 2011 Oct;31(9):1381-7
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Breath Tests
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Female
Heart rate
Hemodynamics
Humans
Hypertension, Portal - blood - etiology - physiopathology
Liver Cirrhosis - blood - complications - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrates - blood
Nitric Oxide - metabolism
Nitrites - blood
Portal Pressure
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Renin-Angiotensin System
Respiratory Function Tests
Splanchnic Circulation
Supine Position
Vasodilation
Abstract
Patients with cirrhosis often develop a systemic vasodilatation and a hyperdynamic circulation with activation of vasoconstrictor systems such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and vasopressin. Increased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis has been implicated in the development of this state of vasodilation and pulmonary dysfunction including increased exhaled NO concentrations. Circulating metabolites (NO(x)) may affect the systemic and pulmonary NO-generation. However, the relations of these abnormalities to the haemodynamic changes remain unclear.
The aims of the present study were to measure changes in exhaled NO in relation to circulating NO(x), RAAS, and haemodynamics.
Twenty patients (eight child class A and 12 class B patients) underwent a liver vein catheterization with determination of splanchnic and systemic haemodynamics. Circulating NO(x) and exhaled NO were determined in the supine and sitting positions and related to haemodynamics, RAAS and lung diffusing capacity (D(L)CO). Eight matched healthy individuals served as controls.
All patients with cirrhosis had portal hypertension. We found no significant difference in exhaled NO between patients and controls and no changes from the supine to the sitting position. Exhaled NO in the patients correlated significantly with plasma volume, heart rate and D(L)CO. NO(x) concentrations were not significantly increased in the patients. NO(x) correlated with portal pressure and haemodynamic indicators of vasodilatation, but not with exhaled NO concentrations.
In patients with moderate cirrhosis, exhaled NO is normal. Circulating NO(x) do not seem to reflect pulmonary and systemic NO release, but NO(x) seems to reflect systemic and splanchnic haemodynamic changes in cirrhosis.
PubMed ID
21745317 View in PubMed
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A contemporary evaluation of pulmonary function in children undergoing lung resection in infancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134155
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2011 May;46(5):829-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Alana Beres
Ann Aspirot
Catherine Paris
Denis Berube
Sarah Bouchard
Jean-Martin Laberge
Larry C Lands
Pramod Puligandla
Author Affiliation
The Montreal Children's Hospital of McGill University Health Centre, Division of Pediatric General Surgery, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3H 1P3.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2011 May;46(5):829-32
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Lung - abnormalities - physiopathology - surgery
Muscle strength
Pneumonectomy - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Quebec - epidemiology
Recovery of Function
Respiratory Muscles - physiology
Surgical Procedures, Elective - statistics & numerical data
Vital Capacity
Abstract
The management of asymptomatic congenital lung lesions is controversial. Some centers recommend resection in infancy, and others prefer observation. Our objective was to evaluate the pulmonary function of children who underwent lung resection at 12 months or younger. We hypothesized that these children would not have a significant reduction in pulmonary function when compared with norms for age.
All patients at 2 tertiary-care children's hospitals who underwent lung resection at 12 months or younger and are currently older than 5 years were identified and prospectively recruited. Pulmonary function testing was standardized in all patients.
Fourteen children were tested prospectively, whereas results were available for another 5 children. Four children were excluded for inability to perform pulmonary function testing (n = 2) or for preexisting pulmonary hypoplasia/syndrome (n = 2). Pulmonary function testing values were considered normal if they were more than 80% of predicted. Forced vital capacity was normal in 14 (93%) of 15 children, and forced expiratory volume in 1 second was normal in 13 (86%) of 15 children. Diffusion capacity and respiratory muscle strength were normal in all children tested.
Most children undergoing lung resection in infancy will have normal pulmonary function tests, supporting our philosophy of early, elective resection of congenital lung lesions.
PubMed ID
21616235 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.