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26 records – page 1 of 3.

[Atypical course of uterine rupture during delivery]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63674
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Apr 29;164(18):2410-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-29-2002
Author
Ramune Kazlauskaite
Author Affiliation
Gynaekologisk/obstetrisk afdeling, Amtssygehuset Roskilde. ramune_k@yahoo.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Apr 29;164(18):2410-1
Date
Apr-29-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Hysterectomy
Obstetric Labor Complications - diagnosis
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis
Puerperal Disorders - diagnosis
Uterine Hemorrhage - diagnosis - surgery
Uterine Rupture - diagnosis - surgery
Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical
Abstract
Uterine rupture is a rare complication of pregnancy, occurring in 0.03% of deliveries in Denmark. This paper describes a case of asymptomatic uterine rupture in a 38-year-old woman. She was admitted with a history of excessive vaginal bleeding 14 days after a spontaneous delivery with the use of vacuum extraction. At the time of laparotomy, a complete uterine rupture was discovered and total hysterectomy was performed.
PubMed ID
12024847 View in PubMed
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[Can deliveries at risk be selected at smaller delivery units?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64225
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Mar 20;118(8):1218-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-1998
Author
J. Holt
I N Vold
Author Affiliation
Barneavdelingen, Nordland Sentralsykehus, Bodø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Mar 20;118(8):1218-20
Date
Mar-20-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birthing Centers - standards - statistics & numerical data
Cesarean Section
Delivery Rooms - standards - statistics & numerical data
Delivery, Obstetric
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Norway
Obstetric Labor Complications - diagnosis - surgery - therapy
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Puerperal Disorders - diagnosis
Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical
Abstract
In order to explore the possibility of converting a delivery unit at a small hospital to a maternity home, we examined the medical records of those women who delivered by Caesarean section, forceps or vacuum extraction at Lofoten hospital during 1995. How many of these women might it have been necessary to transfer to an obstetrical department if Lofoten hospital had been a maternity home caring for low risk deliveries (primipara and multipara)? Out of a total of 271 deliveries (primiparas 98), 49 women delivered by Caesarean section (n = 35), forceps (n = 5) or vacuum extraction (n = 9). Using risk assessment, 22 women (45%) would have been selected for antenatal transfer, and 20 (41%) for intrapartum transport. For seven women no transfer would have been possible. These women would have delivered locally by vacuum extraction. Primipara versus multipara had a relative risk of 2.8 for Caesarean section or assisted vaginal delivery. It is estimated that 8-9% of the women would be selected prenatally for planned delivery at a hospital unit and that 7-8% would be transferred in labour if primiparas delivered at the maternity home. If primiparas were excluded, the proportions would be 41% and 1-2% respectively. In 1997 the delivery unit at Lofoten hospital was temporarily converted to a maternity home for a period of two years.
PubMed ID
9567699 View in PubMed
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Depression and anxiety in the postpartum period and risk of bipolar disorder: A Danish nationwide register-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283428
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2017 May;78(5):e469-e476
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Xiaoqin Liu
Esben Agerbo
Jiong Li
Samantha Meltzer-Brody
Veerle Bergink
Trine Munk-Olsen
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2017 May;78(5):e469-e476
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Bipolar Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Humans
Proportional Hazards Models
Puerperal Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
The first-onset affective episode requiring inpatient treatment in the postpartum period can be a marker of bipolar disorder, but it is unknown whether milder postpartum affective episodes are also indicators of underlying bipolarity. Therefore, we aimed to study whether women with a nonpsychotic postpartum affective episode treated with antidepressants have an increased risk of bipolar disorder.
A register-based cohort study was conducted in Denmark of 122,622 parous women without psychiatric history who received a first-time antidepressant prescription during 1997-2012. We compared women with a first-time antidepressant prescription, which was our indicator of a first-onset affective disorder, within 1 year postpartum to women with a first-time antidepressant prescription outside the postpartum period. Our outcome was psychiatric contact for bipolar disorder (ICD-10 criteria) during follow-up, and we estimated hazard ratios using Cox regressions.
The risk of bipolar disorder among women with a postpartum affective episode was higher than that in women with an affective episode outside the postpartum period. The risk of bipolar disorder was 1.66 (95% CI, 1.12-2.48) for postpartum antidepressant monotherapy and 10.15 (95% CI, 7.13-14.46) for postpartum antidepressant therapy plus a subsequent prescription for anxiolytics when these therapies were compared to antidepressant monotherapy outside the postpartum period.
First-onset nonpsychotic postpartum affective disorder can be a marker of underlying bipolarity. Women who fill an antidepressant prescription following childbirth should be asked about hypomanic or manic symptoms and monitored long term. Clinically, when antidepressant monotherapy is ineffective or the individual woman experiences persistent and concerning symptoms, health professionals should consider a possible bipolar spectrum disorder.
PubMed ID
28570797 View in PubMed
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Did publication of a clinical practice guideline recommendation to screen for type 2 diabetes in women with gestational diabetes change practice?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186916
Source
Diabetes Care. 2003 Feb;26(2):265-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Heather D Clark
Carl van Walraven
Cathy Code
Alan Karovitch
Erin Keely
Author Affiliation
Ottawa Health Research Institute, Ontario, Canada. hclark@ohri.ca
Source
Diabetes Care. 2003 Feb;26(2):265-8
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - analysis
Canada
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis
Diabetes, gestational
Diffusion of Innovation
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Mass Screening
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Puerperal Disorders - diagnosis
Societies, Medical
Abstract
To determine whether women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) were screened postpartum for type 2 diabetes according to the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) guidelines.
The 1998 CDA guidelines recommend that all women diagnosed with GDM be screened postpartum for type 2 diabetes using a 2-h 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The impact of and compliance with this expert opinion-based recommendation is unknown. All women who delivered at the Ottawa Hospital in 1997 (pre-guideline) and 2000 (post-guideline) with confirmed GDM were identified. Using population-based administrative databases, we determined the proportion of these women who had an OGTT, serum glucose test, or glycated hemoglobin (GHb) test in the first postpartum year. Women who had not undergone any blood work were excluded.
There were 131 women in 1997 and 123 women in 2000 with confirmed GDM. Of these, only 69 women in 1997 and 52 women in 2000 had blood work recorded in the database. None of these women had an OGTT performed in either period. We found a significant increase in the measurement of serum glucose (50 women pre-guideline [72.1%], 48 women post-guideline [92.3%], P
PubMed ID
12547846 View in PubMed
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[Early discharge after delivery, a safe and cost-effective form of care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33754
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Jul 8;95(28-29):3190-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-8-1998
Author
H. Odelram
B. Nilsson
D. Pehrsson-Lindell
E. Ljungkvist
Author Affiliation
Lasarettet i Motala.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Jul 8;95(28-29):3190-4
Date
Jul-8-1998
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child Development
Cost-Benefit Analysis
English Abstract
Female
Home Care Services, Hospital-Based - economics - standards
Humans
Infant care
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Obstetric
Length of Stay - economics
Nurse Midwives
Obstetric Labor Complications - diagnosis - nursing - therapy
Patient Discharge - economics
Pregnancy
Puerperal Disorders - diagnosis - nursing - therapy
Sweden
Abstract
Early discharge after delivery, followed by home care, has been offered to maternity patients at Motala General Hospital since 1983. The results have been analysed retrospectively with regard to home care quality, morbidity, mortality, and cost-effectiveness. During the period, 1983-95, about 10,000 children were born at Motala General Hospital. Morbidity and mortality data have been elicited from the patients' records and from Statistics Sweden, the national bureau of statistics. The frequency of early discharge increased from about 20 per cent in 1984 to 66 per cent (79% of normal deliveries) in 1995. Hyperbilirubinaemia and nutritional problems were the predominant forms of morbidity among newborns in the early discharge subgroup, and mortality was zero. The numbers of nurses, assistant nurses and midwives were reduced by 50 per cent during the period, partly due to the early discharge programme, but also due to economies in Swedish health care expenditure. Provided a stable and well organised system is established, with home visits by a midwife and examination by a paediatrician 5-7 days after delivery, and alertness to the possibility of jaundice and nutritional problems is maintained, early discharge is a safe procedure.
PubMed ID
9700264 View in PubMed
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First admission with puerperal psychosis: 7-14 years of follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46502
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Mar;91(3):167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
P. Videbech
G. Gouliaev
Author Affiliation
Department A, Arhus Psychiatric Hospital, Risskov, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Mar;91(3):167-73
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bipolar Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Obstetric Labor, Premature - epidemiology - psychology
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Puerperal Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Recurrence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate women who had first-episode psychosis within 1 year after parturition. The Danish Psychiatric Central Register and the Danish Medical Birth Register were linked to identify all women admitted for the first time to a psychiatric department in Arhus County with a psychotic episode. Fifty cases were found, giving a frequency of first-episode psychosis within 1 year after delivery of 1 per 1000. First-episode psychotic disease within the first month postpartum occurred in 1 case per 2000 deliveries. The age distribution corresponded to that of the background population, but the cases were primiparous more often than expected. The socioeconomic status was equal to that of a matched control group of obstetric patients. Birth complications did not occur more frequently than expected, but the probands had a higher risk of preterm delivery than the controls. The clinical picture of the index episode was that of manic-depressive psychosis in nearly half of the cases, but no cases of schizophrenia were found. Sixty percent of the patients had a picture of severe depression, and 20% suffered from manic disorder. The follow-up, 7 to 14 years later, was carried out by interviewing the general practitioners. Forty percent of the women had not preserved full working capacity due to mental disorder. Moreover, the follow-up pointed to schizophreniform symptoms at the index episode as a predictor of incapacity to work. Recurrences were very common (60%), especially of the nonpuerperal type, and half of the recurrences belonged to the manic-depressive disorders.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7625190 View in PubMed
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Heart Failure in Late Pregnancy and Postpartum: Incidence and Long-Term Mortality in Sweden From 1997 to 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292402
Source
J Card Fail. 2017 May; 23(5):370-378
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Anders Barasa
Annika Rosengren
Tatiana Zverkova Sandström
Lars Ladfors
Maria Schaufelberger
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: anders.barasa@gu.se.
Source
J Card Fail. 2017 May; 23(5):370-378
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - diagnosis - mortality
Humans
Incidence
Postpartum Period - physiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - diagnosis - mortality
Puerperal Disorders - diagnosis - mortality
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Heart failure (HF) in late pregnancy and postpartum (HFPP), of which peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) constitutes the larger part, is still a rare occurrence in Sweden. Population-based data are scarce. Our aim was to characterize HFPP and determine the incidence and mortality in a Swedish cohort.
Through merging data from the National Inpatient, Cause of Death, and Medical Birth Registries, we identified ICD-10 codes for HF and cardiomyopathy within 3 months before delivery to 6 months postpartum. Each case was assigned 5 age-matched control subjects from the Medical Birth Registry. From 1997 to 2010, 241 unique HFPP case subjects and 1063 matched control subjects were identified. Mean incidence was 1 in 5719 deliveries. HFPP was strongly associated with preeclampsia (odds ratio [OR] 11.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.86-18.06), obesity (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.7-3.7), low- and middle-income country (LMIC) of origin (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.14-2.63), and twin deliveries (OR 4.39 CI 95% 2.24-8.58). By the end of the study period deaths among cases were >35-fold those of controls: 9 cases (3.7 %) and 1 control (0.1 %; P?
Notes
CommentIn: J Card Fail. 2017 May;23 (5):379-381 PMID 28342815
PubMed ID
28069474 View in PubMed
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Incidence of hospitalization for postpartum psychotic and bipolar episodes in women with and without prior prepregnancy or prenatal psychiatric hospitalizations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79269
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 Jan;64(1):42-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Harlow Bernard L
Vitonis Allison F
Sparen Par
Cnattingius Sven
Joffe Hadine
Hultman Christina M
Author Affiliation
Obstetrics and Gynecology Epidemiology Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. harlow@epi.umn.edu
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 Jan;64(1):42-8
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bipolar Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Incidence
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Parity
Patient Readmission
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Puerperal Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Recurrence
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
CONTEXT: Postpartum psychosis occurs in 1 to 2 cases per 1000 live births. Most studies have not distinguished postpartum psychosis from bipolar disorder or the proportion of the incidence attributable to prepregnancy psychiatric morbidity. OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of postpartum psychosis and bipolar disorder attributable to previous psychiatric hospitalization. DESIGN: Population-based study using linked registry data to determine postpartum onset of psychotic and bipolar episodes within 90 days after the first birth, by women with and without prepregnancy or prenatal psychiatric hospitalization. We assessed the type, number, and recency of previous hospitalizations on the incidence of hospitalization for postpartum psychotic and bipolar episodes. SETTING: Nationwide Swedish Hospital Discharge and Medical Birth registers. PATIENTS: Swedish women delivering a first live infant between January 1, 1987, and December 31, 2001. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Postpartum hospitalization for psychosis or bipolar disorder. RESULTS: The cumulative incidences for postpartum psychotic and bipolar episodes (adjusted for age at first birth) were 0.07% and 0.03%, respectively. The incidence of psychiatric hospitalizations for postpartum psychotic or bipolar episodes among women without previous psychiatric hospitalizations was 0.04% and 0.01% of first births, respectively; for women with any psychiatric hospitalization before delivery, the incidence was 9.24% and 4.48%, respectively. For postpartum psychotic and bipolar episodes, the risk increased significantly with the recency of prepregnancy hospitalizations, number of previous hospitalizations, and length of most recent hospitalization. More than 40% of women hospitalized during the prenatal period for a bipolar or a psychotic condition were hospitalized again during the postpartum period. Approximately 90% of all postpartum psychotic and bipolar episodes occurred within the first 4 weeks after delivery. CONCLUSIONS: Almost 10% of women hospitalized for psychiatric morbidity before delivery develop postpartum psychosis after their first birth. This underscores the need for obstetricians to assess history of psychiatric symptoms and, with pediatric and psychiatric colleagues, to optimize the treatment of mothers with psychiatric diagnoses through childbirth.
PubMed ID
17199053 View in PubMed
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Maternal body weight development after pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62235
Source
Int J Obes. 1990 Feb;14(2):159-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990
Author
A. Ohlin
S. Rössner
Author Affiliation
Obesity Unit, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Obes. 1990 Feb;14(2):159-73
Date
Feb-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Breast Feeding
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis
Puerperal Disorders - diagnosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Weight Gain
Abstract
Body weight development during pregnancy was monitored for 2295 women, and up to 1 year post-partum for 1423 of them, at 14 maternity clinics throughout Stockholm. The objective was to find predictors for post-partum weight retention. The mean weight gain after 1 year post-partum compared with the pre-pregnancy body weight (delta-weight) was 1.5 +/- 3.6 kg (P less than 0.001). Of the group 30 per cent lost weight, 56 per cent gained 0 to less than 5 kg and 14 per cent gained greater than or equal to 5 kg. When this result was corrected for possible average underestimation of the self-reported pre-pregnancy weight and weight gain with age, the mean delta-weight was 0.5 kg. The factor with the highest correlation with delta-weight was pregnancy weight gain (r = 0.36, P less than 0.001). Very low r-values, although statistically significant, were obtained for the correlation between the delta-weight and lactation (r = -0.09, P less than 0.01) and age (r = 0.06, P less than 0.05). The delta-weight was not correlated with pre-pregnancy body weight or parity. Women with a delta-weight of greater than or equal to 5 kg had, on average, a higher pre-pregnancy body weight, but initially overweight women had a more variable weight development than lighter women. One in every four women with a weight retention of greater than or equal to 6 kg after a previous pregnancy experienced a high weight gain even after the present pregnancy. Women who stopped smoking had a significantly higher delta-weight than either smokers or non-smokers. Women in the age group greater than or equal to 36 years had a higher mean pre-pregnancy body weight than younger women, and in the age group 26-35 years the pre-pregnancy body weight was increased with increased parity. Thus, post-partum weight development is individual and of the factors studied here only high weight gain during pregnancy and smoking cessation can be considered as predictors for persistent weight gain after 1 year post-partum.
PubMed ID
2341224 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.