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The 2-year costs and effects of a public health nursing case management intervention on mood-disordered single parents on social assistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191135
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2002 Feb;8(1):45-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Maureen Markle-Reid
Gina Browne
Jacqueline Roberts
Amiram Gafni
Carolyn Byrne
Author Affiliation
System-Linked Research Unit on Health and Social Service Utilization, School of Nursing, McMaster University, Room 3N46, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5, Canada. mreid@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2002 Feb;8(1):45-59
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Case Management - economics
Child
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Depressive Disorder - economics - nursing - rehabilitation
Employment
Female
Health Care Costs
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Ontario
Public Assistance
Public Health Nursing - economics
Single Parent - psychology
Social Adjustment
Abstract
This randomized controlled trial was designed to evaluate the 2-year costs and effects of a proactive, public health nursing case management approach compared with a self-directed approach for 129 single parents (98% were mothers) on social assistance in a Canadian setting. A total of 43% of these parents had a major depressive disorder and 38% had two or three other health conditions at baseline.
Study participants were recruited over a 12 month period and randomized into two groups: one receiving proactive public health nursing and one which did not.
At 2 years, 69 single parents with 123 children receiving proactive public health nursing (compared with 60 parents with 91 children who did not receive public health nursing services) showed a slightly greater reduction in dysthymia and slightly higher social adjustment. There was no difference between the public health and control groups in total per parent annual cost of health and support services. However, costs were averted due to a 12% difference in non-use of social assistance in the previous 12 months for parents in the public health nursing group. This translates into an annual cost saving of 240,000 dollars (Canadian) of costs averted within 1 year for every 100 parents.
In the context of a system of national health and social insurance, this study supports the fact that it is no more costly to proactively service this population of parents on social assistance.
PubMed ID
11882101 View in PubMed
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Source
Northwest Public Health. 2010:S2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Spr-Sum-2010
tuberculin skin testing. Alaska chose to retain the tuberculin skin testing as a population screening tool. The strategy in Alaska involved mass chest X-ray screening of Alaska Native village residents. State Public Health Nurses (PHN), who were partly funded by the Indian Health Service, conducted
  1 document  
Author
Hurlburt, WB
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Division of Public Health
Source
Northwest Public Health. 2010:S2
Date
Spr-Sum-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
284563
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Indian Health Service
Public health nurses
Sanitarium
Tuberculosis
Abstract
In the mid-20th century, Alaska Native people experienced the highest incidence of tuberculosis of any population group, ever. The crude mortality rate from tuberculosis in the Kotzebue area in the mid-1950s was three times the crude mortality rate from all causes today.
Documents

NPH_April_2010_Alaska.pdf

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1992 Ontario Survey of Public Health Nurses: perceptions of roles and activities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218313
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 May-Jun;85(3):175-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
L W Chambers
J. Underwood
T. Halbert
C A Woodward
J. Heale
S. Isaacs
Author Affiliation
Hamilton-Wentworth Department of Public Health Services, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 May-Jun;85(3):175-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Institutional Relations
Health promotion
Humans
Nursing Evaluation Research
Ontario
Public Health Nursing - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Abstract
A survey of public health nurses (PHNs) who work in official public health units in Ontario was undertaken to determine whether their perceptions of their roles and activities concurred with a 1990 Canadian Public Health Association report which describes the roles and qualifications of public health nursing in Canada. The survey questionnaire was completed by 1,849 PHNs in all 42 public health units (response rate = 85%). About one tenth of the PHNs reported no activity as a caregiver/service provider. Most PHNs reported being active in the roles of educator/consultant, social marketer, and facilitator/communicator/collaborator. The community developer, policy formulator, research/evaluator, and resource manager/planner/coordinator roles were less frequently performed, however, increased activities in such roles were expected in the future. Nurses said that they needed further preparation to perform the latter roles. These results have implications for deployment of PHNs as Ontario's health system shifts to community health and health promotion.
PubMed ID
7922961 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of screening and abortion for Down syndrome among Finnish midwives and public health nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200072
Source
Prenat Diagn. 1999 Nov;19(11):1015-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
P. Jallinoja
P. Santalahti
H. Toiviainen
E. Hemminki
Author Affiliation
Health Services Research Unit, National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health, Helsinki, Finland. piia@jallinoja@helsinki.fi
Source
Prenat Diagn. 1999 Nov;19(11):1015-22
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Down Syndrome - diagnosis
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Nurse Midwives
Pregnancy
Prenatal Diagnosis - psychology
Public health nursing
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Abstract
In this study we evaluated how well maternal serum screening and abortions for Down syndrome were accepted among midwives and public health nurses, and compared how those who accepted and did not accept abortions for Down syndrome differed from each other. The questionnaire was mailed in 1998 to 400 midwives and 400 public health nurses. 79 per cent responded. The majority said that all pregnant women should be offered a screening test for Down syndrome, but less than half accepted abortion for Down syndrome. Thus, the 'informative part' of the screening (serum screening itself) is supported more often than the 'operative part' (selective abortion)-or at least the 'operative part' was found to be a more difficult question. We suggest that whereas screening may be perceived as a question of more choices, information and self-determination, abortion is more clearly a moral question. The professional background characteristics and attitudes of those accepting and not accepting abortion for Down syndrome were relatively similar, but having a midwife's education, practical involvement in serum screening and having patients with Down syndrome were associated with a somewhat higher percentage of acceptance and a lower percentage of 'don't know' responses.
PubMed ID
10589051 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and implementation of the nurse-family partnership in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128390
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(7 Suppl 1):eS42-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Susan M Jack
Dianne Busser
Debbie Sheehan
Andrea Gonzalez
Emily J Zwygers
Harriet L Macmillan
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. jacksm@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(7 Suppl 1):eS42-8
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child, Preschool
Feasibility Studies
Female
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Infant
Maternal-Child Nursing - organization & administration
Models, Nursing
Models, organizational
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Professional-Family Relations
Program Evaluation
Public Health Nursing - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Vulnerable Populations
Young Adult
Abstract
International agencies are required to adapt, pilot and then evaluate the effectiveness of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) prior to broad implementation of this public health intervention. The objectives of this qualitative case study were to: 1) determine whether the NFP can be implemented in Canada with fidelity to the US model, and 2) identify the adaptations required to increase the acceptability of the intervention for service providers and families.
108 low-income, first-time mothers in Hamilton, Ontario, received the NFP intervention. In-depth interviews were conducted with NFP clients (n=38), family members (n=14) and community professionals (n=24).
Hamilton, Ontario.INTERVENTION AND DATA COLLECTION: An intensive nurse home visitation program delivered to women starting early in pregnancy and continuing until the child was two years old. Processes to adapt and implement the NFP were explored across seven focus groups with public health nurses and managers. Eighty documents were reviewed to identify implementation challenges. Data were analyzed using directed content analysis.
The NFP model elements are acceptable to Canadian health care providers, public health nurses and families receiving the intervention. The primary adaptation required was to reduce nurse caseloads from 25 to 20 active clients. Recommendations for adapting and implementing all model elements are described.
The NFP model requires minor adaptations to increase the acceptability of the intervention to Canadian stakeholders. A consistent approach to adapting the NFP program in Canada is necessary as provincial jurisdictions commit themselves to supporting an experimental evaluation of the effectiveness of the NFP.
PubMed ID
23618049 View in PubMed
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Administration and maintenance of a long term sodium fluoride mouthrinse program in northern Newfounland and Labrador

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76570
Source
Pages 377-380 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Training Workshops for the public health nurses were arranged at which they were familiar- ized with all aspects of the program. They then instructed the teachers using movies I. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7 ? \ LABRADOR j ( ,.,~"--.,.,___; \ ® "ck ~r_ ___ _ 1978-1983 No. of Schools North
  1 document  
Author
Messer, J.
Author Affiliation
Dental Services, Grenfell Regional Health Services, St. Anthony, Newfoundland
Source
Pages 377-380 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Date
1985
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Dental decay
Funding
Participation rate
Poison control
Public health nurses
Sodium Fluoride
Teachers
Documents
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Adverse events following immunization: evaluating an enhanced nursing role for PHNs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115462
Source
Can Nurse. 2013 Feb;109(2):16-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Jasmeen Gahunia
Mark Bigham
Stephanie Konrad
M Elizabeth Snow
Author Affiliation
Fraser Health Authority.
Source
Can Nurse. 2013 Feb;109(2):16-20
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communicable Disease Control - methods
Humans
Immunization - adverse effects
Nurse's Role
Population Surveillance - methods
Public Health Nursing - methods
Abstract
Maintaining confidence in vaccine safety is critical to successful public health immunization programs. Surveillance and assessment of adverse events following immunization (AEFIs) are important for maintaining vaccine safety. The authors describe the evaluation of an initiative at Fraser Health Authority designed to enhance the role of a communicable disease nurse coordinator (CDNC) in assessing AEFI reports, in collaboration with a designated medical health officer (MHO) as required, and providing recommendations to clients and immunization providers. Previously, only MHOs performed this role. This evaluation project demonstrates this initiative's feasibility and provides a roadmap for health authorities interested in pursuing a similar model. MHOs, public health nurses and public health management expressed satisfaction with the process and the quality of the CDNC's recommendations. There was no statistically significant difference in median turnaround time for AEFI reporting date and date of recommendation, indicating this work is completed in as timely a manner by the CDNC as by the MHO. This role provides opportunity for professional growth, facilitates nursing practice to full scope, enables acquisition of specialized knowledge and provides a platform to share nursing expertise at a provincial level.
PubMed ID
23505845 View in PubMed
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Advocacy oral history: a research methodology for social activism in nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207189
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 1997 Dec;20(2):32-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
A R Rafael
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 1997 Dec;20(2):32-44
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Feminism
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Nursing Research - methods
Ontario
Philosophy, Nursing
Power (Psychology)
Public health nursing
Reproducibility of Results
Social Change
Social Justice
Abstract
The reinstatement of social activism as a central feature of nursing practice has been advocated by nursing scholars and is consistent with contemporary conceptualizations of primary health care and health promotion that are rooted in critical social theory's concept of empowerment. Advocacy oral history from a feminist postmodern perspective offers a method of research that has the potential and purpose to empower participants to transform their political and social realities and may, therefore, be considered social activism. A recent study of public health nurses who had experienced significant distress through the reduction and redirection of their practice is provided as an exemplar of advocacy oral history. Philosophies underpinning the research method and characteristics of feminist postmodern research are reviewed and implications for the use of this methodology for social activism in nursing are drawn.
PubMed ID
9398937 View in PubMed
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457 records – page 1 of 46.