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1014 records – page 1 of 102.

[10th anniversary of the Year of Old Person: towards the society for all ages].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153414
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2009;22(4):535-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
O N Mikhailova
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2009;22(4):535-8
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Congresses as topic
Humans
International Cooperation
Longevity
Population Dynamics
Public Policy
Russia
Social Planning
Socioeconomic Factors
United Nations
Abstract
The paper highlights the milestones in the development of the UN idea of the Society for All Ages, originally announced as a motto of the International Year of Old Persons and later accepted as a central concept of the Madrid International Plan of Action on Aging (MIPA). In accord with MIPA building of the Society for All Ages will be a major issue in policies and programmes on aging in the XXI century. According to the UN experts opinion demographic tendencies may produce considerable impact on economy, social sphere and safety of Russia. The issues of aging are far from being completely and rapidly included into national development strategies on priority basis.
PubMed ID
20405719 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal youth suicide in Quebec: the contribution of public policy for prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108699
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Sep-Dec;36(5-6):399-405
Publication Type
Article
Author
Michel Tousignant
Livia Vitenti
Nathalie Morin
Author Affiliation
CRISE, University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada. Electronic address: tousignant.michel@uqam.ca.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Sep-Dec;36(5-6):399-405
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Crime
Databases, Factual
Female
Housing
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Public Policy
Qualitative Research
Quebec - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - ethnology - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The high rate of youth suicide in some First Nations villages of Northern Quebec is an important public health problem. Based on a six-year field study in three villages belonging to the Atikamekw and Anishinabe groups, this paper proposes changes in three areas of social policy that could contribute to prevention of youth suicide. These three areas are: youth protection, administration of justice, and housing. An argument is made first to adapt the youth protection law of Quebec and to give greater responsibility to communities in individual cases in order to prevent child placement outside the villages. Regarding the administration of justice, we suggest initiatives to encourage rapid prosecution of crimes on reserves and the adoption of an approach based on reconciliation between perpetrator and victim. Finally, we indicate how housing measures could help safeguard children's wellbeing given that overcrowding can contribute to suicide. The discussion also proposes that these three key changes in social policy could be relevant in other Aboriginal communities both within and outside of Quebec.
PubMed ID
23856179 View in PubMed
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Abortion and neonaticide: ethics, practice, and policy in four nations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58480
Source
Bioethics. 2002 Jun;16(3):202-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Michael L Gross
Author Affiliation
Department of Political Science, The University of Haifa, Mt. Carmel, Haifa, Israel. mgross@poli.haifa.ac.il
Source
Bioethics. 2002 Jun;16(3):202-30
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities
Abortion, Eugenic
Abortion, Legal
Adult
Comparative Study
Decision Making
Denmark
Developed Countries
Ethical Analysis
Euthanasia, Passive
Female
Fetus
Great Britain
Health Care Rationing
Homicide
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Internationality
Israel
Parents
Personhood
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Public Policy
Quality of Life
Resuscitation
Social Values
United States
Value of Life
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
Abortion, particularly later-term abortion, and neonaticide, selective non-treatment of newborns, are feasible management strategies for fetuses or newborns diagnosed with severe abnormalities. However, policy varies considerably among developed nations. This article examines abortion and neonatal policy in four nations: Israel, the US, the UK and Denmark. In Israel, late-term abortion is permitted while non-treatment of newborns is prohibited. In the US, on the other hand, later-term abortion is severely restricted, while treatment to newborns may be withdrawn. Policy in the UK and Denmark bridges some of these gaps with liberal abortion and neonatal policy. Disparate policy within and between nations creates practical and ethical difficulties. Practice diverges from policy as many practitioners find it difficult to adhere to official policy. Ethically, it is difficult to entirely justify perinatal policy in these nations. In each nation, there are elements of ethically sound policy, while other aspects cannot be defended. Ethical policy hinges on two underlying normative issues: the question of fetal/newborn status and the morality of killing and letting die. While each issue has been the subject of extensive debate, there are firm ethical norms that should serve as the basis for coherent and consistent perinatal policy. These include 1) a grant of full moral and legal status to the newborn but only partial moral and legal status to the late-term fetus 2) a general prohibition against feticide unless to save the life of the mother or prevent the birth of a fetus facing certain death or severe pain or suffering and 3) a general endorsement of neonaticide subject to a parent's assessment of the newborn's interest broadly defined to consider physical harm as well as social, psychological and or financial harm to related third parties. Policies in each of the nations surveyed diverging from these norms should be the subject of public discourse and, where possible, legislative reform.
PubMed ID
12211246 View in PubMed
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'Access arrangements' for biobanks: a fine line between facilitating and hindering collaboration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141708
Source
Public Health Genomics. 2011;14(2):104-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
S. Fortin
S. Pathmasiri
R. Grintuch
M. Deschênes
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, University of Montreal, Montreal, Que., Canada.
Source
Public Health Genomics. 2011;14(2):104-14
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Specimen Banks - economics - organization & administration
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Genetic Research
Genomics
Humans
Informed consent
Public Health
Public Policy
Tissue Banks - organization & administration
Abstract
This decade is witnessing the proliferation of large-scale population-based biobanks. Many biobanks have reached the stage of offering access to their collection of data and samples to the scientific community. This, however, requires that access arrangements be established to govern the relationship between biobanks and users. Access arrangements capture the convergence of all normative elements in the life cycle of a biobank: policies, laws, common practices, commitments made by the biobank to participants, the expectations of funders, and the needs of the scientific community. Furthermore, access arrangements shape new legal agreements between 'biobankers' and researchers to ensure appropriate, regulated and efficient use of biobank materials. This paper begins by examining the particularities of access arrangements, identifying the key elements of these new regulatory instruments. Second, the paper looks at various strategies used by biobanks to regulate access and surveys the underlying motivations of these strategies and the impact they can have on potential international collaboration. Third, an example of the challenges encountered in creating access policy is illustrated using the case of CARTaGENE, a biobank based in Montreal, Canada. Last, the paper presents how Public Population Project in Genomics (P(3)G) facilitates the work of biobankers and improves collaboration throughout the international human genomics research community.
PubMed ID
20689244 View in PubMed
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Achieving health for all: a framework for health promotion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234369
Source
Can Nurse. 1987 Dec;83(11):suppl 1-13, 1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1987
Source
Can Nurse. 1987 Dec;83(11):suppl 1-13, 1-13
Date
Dec-1987
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation
Goals
Health promotion
Humans
Public Policy
Quality of Life
PubMed ID
3690492 View in PubMed
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Actor-network theory: a tool to support ethical analysis of commercial genetic testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180338
Source
New Genet Soc. 2003 Dec;22(3):271-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Bryn Williams-Jones
Janice E Graham
Author Affiliation
Centre for Family Research & Homerton College, University of Cambridge, UK.
Source
New Genet Soc. 2003 Dec;22(3):271-96
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - genetics
Canada
Diffusion of Innovation
Female
Genes, BRCA1
Genes, BRCA2
Genetic Counseling
Genetic Research
Genetic Services - economics - ethics - trends
Genetic Testing - economics - ethics - methods
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Industry
Internationality
Marketing
Models, organizational
Patents as Topic
Private Sector
Public Policy
Public Sector
Research Support as Topic
Sensitivity and specificity
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Technology Transfer
Abstract
Social, ethical and policy analysis of the issues arising from gene patenting and commercial genetic testing is enhanced by the application of science and technology studies, and Actor-Network Theory (ANT) in particular. We suggest the potential for transferring ANT's flexible nature to an applied heuristic methodology for gathering empirical information and for analysing the complex networks involved in the development of genetic technologies. Three concepts are explored in this paper--actor-networks, translation, and drift--and applied to the case of Myriad Genetics and their commercial BRACAnalysis genetic susceptibility test for hereditary breast cancer. Treating this test as an active participant in socio-technical networks clarifies the extent to which it interacts with, shapes and is shaped by people, other technologies, and institutions. Such an understanding enables more sophisticated and nuanced technology assessment, academic analysis, as well as public debate about the social, ethical and policy implications of the commercialization of new genetic technologies.
PubMed ID
15115034 View in PubMed
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Act respecting the family allowance for children, No. 147, 19 March 1986, and Act respecting children's allowances and the advance payment of children's subsidies, No. 350, 4 June 1986.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38576
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1988;15:91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1988;15:91
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aid to Families with Dependent Children
Demography
Denmark
Developed Countries
Europe
Family Planning Policy
Geography
Legislation
Population
Public Policy
Residence Characteristics
Scandinavia
Abstract
In 1986, Denmark's family allowance scheme was modified by these two Acts with effect from 1 July 1987. The regular allowance and the youth allowance were abolished by the second Act and replaced by the first Act with a single allowance "for children in the family" payable with respect to every child under the age of 18. The new allowance is payable quarterly and set at DKr 1250 per quarter. Payment of the allowance is taxable in Denmark, but no longer conditional on the child being permanently resident in Denmark. Allowances are no longer dependent on the income of parents and are adjusted by a percentage fixed by law every year, rather than by the cost of living.
PubMed ID
12289714 View in PubMed
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1014 records – page 1 of 102.