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11 records – page 1 of 2.

[Assessment of the influence of socio-economic factors on health and demographic indices].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115862
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Nov-Dec;(6):36-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
M I Chubirko
N M Pichuzhkina
L A Masailova
G V Lastochkina
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Nov-Dec;(6):36-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cities
Humans
Hygiene - standards
Morbidity - trends
Mortality - trends
Population Dynamics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Public Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data - trends
Russia
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
THE THEME: assessment of the influence of socio-economic factors on health and demographic indicators.
population of municipalities of the Voronezh region.
the justification of the system of measures aimed at stabilizing the medical-demographic situation at the regional level.
methods of Health Statistics; questionnaire.
the low socio-economic status of the population is set in the territories, depressed at the level of demographic development. The contribution of socio-economic indicators in health and demographic situation has been determined Reliable cause-effect relationships between health and demographic indicators and the level of socio-economic development of the population have been identified.
PubMed ID
23457991 View in PubMed
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Climate change and health effects in Northwest Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130238
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 6-10.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
  1 document  
Author
Michael Brubaker
James Berner
Raj Chavan
John Warren
Author Affiliation
Center for Climate and Health, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK, USA. mbrubaker@anthc.org
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011; 4: 6-10.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
332455
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Climate Change - statistics & numerical data
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology
Floods
Food Supply
Health status
Humans
Inuits
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental health
Public Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
This article provides examples of adverse health effects, including weather-related injury, food insecurity, mental health issues, and water infrastructure damage, and the responses to these effects that are currently being applied in two Northwest Alaska communities.
In Northwest Alaska, warming is resulting in a broad range of unusual weather and environmental conditions, including delayed freeze-up, earlier breakup, storm surge, coastal erosion, and thawing permafrost. These are just some of the climate impacts that are driving concerns about weather-related injury, the spread of disease, mental health issues, infrastructure damage, and food and water security. Local leaders are challenged to identify appropriate adaptation strategies to address climate impacts and related health effects. IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: The tribal health system is combining local observations, traditional knowledge, and western science to perform community-specific climate change health impact assessments. Local leaders are applying this information to develop adaptation responses.
The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium will describe relationships between climate impacts and health effects and provide examples of community-scaled adaptation actions currently being applied in Northwest Alaska.
Climate change is increasing vulnerability to injury, disease, mental stress, food insecurity, and water insecurity. Northwest communities are applying adaptation approaches that are both specific and appropriate.
The health impact assessment process is effective in raising awareness, encouraging discussion, engaging partners, and implementing adaptation planning. With community-specific information, local leaders are applying health protective adaptation measures.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2008 Nov;98(11):2072-818382002
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Jun;70(3):266-7321703129
Cites: Int J Public Health. 2010 Apr;55(2):85-9619941059
PubMed ID
22022304 View in PubMed
Documents

Brubaker-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

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[Health problems of the population of the Russian Federation and its forecasting up to 2005].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193604
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2001 May-Jun;(3):3-10
Publication Type
Article

Measles in Europe: an epidemiological assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153265
Source
Lancet. 2009 Jan 31;373(9661):383-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-2009
Author
Mark Muscat
Henrik Bang
Jan Wohlfahrt
Steffen Glismann
Kåre Mølbak
Author Affiliation
EUVAC.NET hub, Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Lancet. 2009 Jan 31;373(9661):383-9
Date
Jan-31-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Measles - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage
Population Surveillance - methods
Public Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Time Factors
Vaccination - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Measles persists in Europe despite the incorporation of the measles vaccine into routine childhood vaccination programmes more than 20 years ago. Our aim was therefore to review the epidemiology of measles in relation to the goal of elimination by 2010.
National surveillance institutions from 32 European countries submitted data for 2006-07. Data for age-group, diagnosis confirmation, vaccination, hospital treatment, the presence of acute encephalitis as a complication of disease, and death were obtained. 30 countries also supplied data about importation of disease. Clinical, laboratory-confirmed, and epidemiologically linked cases that met the requirements for national surveillance were analysed. Cases were separated by age: younger than 1 year, 1-4 years, 5-9 years, 10-14 years, 15-19 years, and older than 20 years. Countries with indigenous measles incidence per 100 000 inhabitants per year of 0, less than 0.1, 0.1-1, and more than 1 were grouped into categories of zero, low, moderate, and high incidence, respectively.
For the 2 years of the study, 12 132 cases of measles were recorded with most cases (n=10 329; 85%) from five countries: Romania, Germany, UK, Switzerland, and Italy. Most cases were unvaccinated or incompletely vaccinated children; however, almost a fifth were aged 20 years or older. For the same 2 years, seven measles-related deaths were recorded. High measles incidence in some European countries revealed suboptimum vaccination coverage. Of the 210 cases that were reported as being imported, 117 (56%) came from another country within Europe and 43 (20%) from Asia.
The suboptimum vaccination coverage raises serious doubts that the goal of elimination by 2010 can be attained. Achievement and maintenance of optimum vaccination coverage and improved surveillance are the cornerstones of the measles elimination plan for Europe.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Jan 31;373(9661):356-819131098
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Mar 21;373(9668):100819304015
PubMed ID
19131097 View in PubMed
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[The factors impacting population health condition and medical care appealability]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91274
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2008 Jul-Aug;(4):17-20
Publication Type
Article

[The health characteristics of the population dwelling the northern territories]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91276
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2008 Jul-Aug;(4):3-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Golovina S M
Rogovina A G
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2008 Jul-Aug;(4):3-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Health Status Indicators
Hospitalization
Hospitals - utilization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity - trends
Mortality - trends
Public Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Public Policy
Russia
Siberia
Abstract
The role of the latitudinal gradient in the deepening of the regional differentiation of population health and in the effectiveness of the medical care organization is considered. The analysis of the actual trends in mortality, morbidity and medical aid appealability in the context of the three singled out groups of the Russian Federation subjects is given. The latitudinal differentiation of the basic public health indicators and their dependency on the resource supply and the workload of health care system is demonstrated. The need to take into account these characteristics in the process of elaboration of the social policy on the federal and regional levels is emphasized.
PubMed ID
19006825 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.