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14 records – page 1 of 2.

Canada responds: an explosion in doctors' health awareness, promotion and intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178094
Source
Med J Aust. 2004 Oct 4;181(7):386-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-4-2004

Cardiovascular health in indigenous communities: successful programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144534
Source
Heart Lung Circ. 2010 May-Jun;19(5-6):351-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mark D Huffman
James M Galloway
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, United States.
Source
Heart Lung Circ. 2010 May-Jun;19(5-6):351-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Health status
Humans
Male
North America
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Preventive Medicine - organization & administration
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Public Health - standards - trends
Quality of Health Care
Abstract
Indigenous people across the globe have generally had suboptimal access to quality medical care and effective prevention programs. The available programs that existed have generally been poorly funded and have primarily focussed on infectious diseases. More recent trends denoting significant rising morbidity and mortality of chronic diseases have brought some limited medical focus on cardiovascular diseases, their risk factors and their prevention. However, there is a growing body of evidence-published and unpublished-of developed and developing successful programs to provide culturally appropriate and sensitive treatment for cardiovascular diseases and prevention. Within this report, we aim to describe some of these programs in order to understand common approaches and links that make them successful. Once this survey is completed, a template for successful CVD programs can be created for the development of future programs.
We used several methods to gather information about successful Indigenous CVD programs: Pub Med search (keywords: Indigenous, native, First Nation, Aboriginal, cardiovascular, cardiac, etc.), online searches of government-based health programs (World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control, etc.) and non-government health programs (World Heart Federation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, etc.), and, importantly, personal communication with multiple thought leaders and program directors in the field of international CVD treatment and prevention.
Programs can be divided into: (1) epidemiologic programs, which focus on data collection, (2) focussed prevention programs and population approach to CVD prevention, and (3) clinical prevention and intervention programs.
Common themes that define successful Indigenous CVD programs include: dedicated focus on the Indigenous population, widespread community involvement within the Indigenous population, often through the use of Indigenous community health workers, a focus on high-risk individuals within the population and regularly scheduled contact between the program and participants. We recommend that these themes are incorporated during development of future CVD programs for Indigenous people.
PubMed ID
20359950 View in PubMed
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Chapter 11. Public health in the future. Health in Sweden: The National Public Health Report 2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71810
Source
Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2001;58:231-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
B. Haglund
M. Rosén
Author Affiliation
Centre for Epidemiology, National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden. bengt.haglund@sos.se
Source
Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2001;58:231-9
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health status
Humans
Incidence
Life Expectancy - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prognosis
Public Health - standards - trends
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Social Change
Sweden
Time Factors
PubMed ID
11708629 View in PubMed
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[Cytogenetic status of the residents of the Gydansky Peninsula (Gydan)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290303
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(9):865-8
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
E V Shinkaruk
E V Agbalyan
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(9):865-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Cytogenetic Analysis - methods - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Exposure - analysis - prevention & control - standards
Health Plan Implementation - methods - trends
Humans
Industrial Development - trends
Population Health - statistics & numerical data
Public Health - standards - trends
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The relevance of the study on the Gydansky Peninsula lies in poor knowledge and inaccessibility of the territory, planned intensive industrial development of the Gydansky Peninsula, in 2011 there were received licenses for the exploration of license areas at the peninsula up to 2031. Industrial development will inevitably lead to certain environmental shifts, emission of the harmful substances into biosphere, the accumulation of anthropogenic pollutants in soil and water sources. The proposed development of the territory of the Peninsula Gydan sets the task of assessment of the impact of gas and oil production in conditions of the far North on health, as well indigenous persons as employees recruited to this of the region. One of the informative approaches to the assessment of population health is the assessment of the cytogenetic status with the use of noninvasive analysis of buccal epithelium. The aim of the study is to determine the cytogenetic status of the inhabitants of the village of Antipayuta of the Yamal-Nenets Autonomous Okrug for the assessment of the impact of environmental factors on the health of the population at the present stage of the industrial development of the territory. Samples of buccal epithelium of 81 alien and indigenous people of the Yamal-Nenets Autonomous district were the object of the investigation. There was performed the analysis of indices of cells of buccal epithelium of the residents living in the village in comparison with the control group. The analysis of samples was performed on a Nikon Eclipse E100 microscope. For the assessment of the cytogenetic status of the individual there was used the proposed by Sycheva L. P. (2012-Index of accumulation of cytogenetic damages (Iac). It is shown that the frequency of occurrence of micronucleus and nuclear protrusions does not exceed the performance of the control group. The index of accumulation of cytogenetic damage for the population of the village is 0.78±0.07% and corresponds to a low level. The analysis of indices of buccal epithelial cells of residents living in rural areas was performed in the comparison with the control group The prevalence rate of cells with micronuclei and protrusions were shown to account of 14.6% andfail to exceed indices in the control group. Accumulation index of cytogenetic damages for the village population is 0.78 ± 0.07 % and corresponds to the low level. The amount of cells with micronuclei and protrusions in the current study is by 14.6% lower than the average of the control group. The intensity of proliferative processes and apoptosis in the comparison groups occurs evenly.
PubMed ID
29431322 View in PubMed
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Human biomonitoring to optimize fish consumption advice: Reducing uncertainty when evaluating benefits and risks

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3086
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2005 Mar;95(3):393-397
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
  1 website  
Author
Arnold, SM
Lynn, TV
Verbrugge, LA
Middaugh, JP
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, Section of Epidemiology, 3601 C St, Ste 540, PO Box 240249 Anchorage, AK 99524-0249, USA. scott_arnold@health.state.ak.us
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2005 Mar;95(3):393-397
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Chemistry, Analytical - trends
Counseling - standards
Environmental Monitoring - methods - standards
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - poisoning
Female
Fishes
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Mass Screening
Mercury Poisoning - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Methylmercury Compounds - adverse effects - analysis - poisoning
Middle Aged
No-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level
Nutrition - education
Nutrition Policy - trends
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Public Health - standards - trends
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Seafood - adverse effects - analysis - poisoning
Uncertainty
United States
United States Environmental Protection Agency
United States Food and Drug Administration
Abstract
National fish consumption advisories that are based solely on assessment of risk of exposure to contaminants without consideration of consumption benefits result in overly restrictive advice that discourages eating fish even in areas where such advice is unwarranted. In fact, generic fish advisories may have adverse public health consequences because of decreased fish consumption and substitution of foods that are less healthy. Public health is on the threshold of a new era for determining actual exposures to environmental contaminants, owing to technological advances in analytical chemistry. It is now possible to target fish consumption advice to specific at-risk populations by evaluating individual contaminant exposures and health risk factors. Because of the current epidemic of nutritionally linked disease, such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, general recommendations for limiting fish consumption are ill conceived and potentially dangerous.
Notes
Comment In: American Journal of Public Health. 2005 Aug;95(8):1304; author reply 1304-1305
PubMed ID
15727965 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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[Hygienic problems of rural water supply and ways to their correction].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181903
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 Nov-Dec;(6):16-7
Publication Type
Article

Impact of transition on public health in Ukraine: case study of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7137
Source
BMJ. 2005 Jul 23;331(7510):216-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-23-2005
Author
Diane DeBell
Richard Carter
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research in Health and Social Care, Institute of Health and Social Care, Anglia Polytechnic University, Chelmsford CM1 1SQ. ddebell@compuserve.com
Source
BMJ. 2005 Jul 23;331(7510):216-9
Date
Jul-23-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Culture
Data Collection
Disease Outbreaks
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services - supply & distribution
Health Transition
Humans
Poverty
Public Health - standards - trends
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ukraine - epidemiology
Notes
Comment In: BMJ. 2005 Jul 23;331(7510):21916037462
PubMed ID
16037461 View in PubMed
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Surgery in Norway: beyond the scalpel in the 21st century.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91586
Source
Arch Surg. 2008 Oct;143(10):1011-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Søreide Kjetil
Glomsaker Tom
Søreide Jon Arne
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Stavanger University Hospital, PB 8100, N-4068 Stavanger, Norway. ksoreide@mac.com
Source
Arch Surg. 2008 Oct;143(10):1011-6
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Delivery of Health Care - standards - trends
Education, Medical, Graduate
Female
Forecasting
General Surgery - education - trends
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Male
Norway
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - trends
Physicians, Women - statistics & numerical data
Public Health - standards - trends
Quality of Health Care
Abstract
Norwegian surgeons provide for a wide range of modern surgical services with excellent results. With a thriving economy and a high standard of living and education, the major disease spectrum relates to cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Almost all types of surgery are performed in Norway. Improvements have been achieved through national programs and population-based registries have served as instrumental tools (eg, for cancer surgery). About 1 in every 5 general surgeons holds a PhD degree, with an even greater number for some subspecialties (30%-40% have PhD degrees). Trauma and acute care surgery is not a formal specialty, but a formal trauma system is likely to be established in the near future. Ring-fencing of elective surgical tasks from emergency surgery is increasingly being performed in surgical departments. Governmental coverage (85% of health care costs) and equal access to care have created waiting lists and given rise to private surgical outpatient clinics. The increase of women in medical school (>60%) has yet to be paralleled in most surgical specialists (eg, about 10% of general surgeons are women). Subspecialization, the 40-hour workweek, technical improvements (interventional and minimally invasive procedures), and quality demands have changed the surgical work scenario for both junior and senior staff members. Formal requirements in training duration and educational content are likely to change. Recruitment to surgery and ensuring continuity of patient care take surgery in Norway beyond the scalpel into the 21st century.
PubMed ID
18936382 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.