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140 records – page 1 of 14.

[About the formation of legislation in the field of chemical and biological safety of the Russian Federation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290153
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):717-21
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
E A Boyko
N N Goncharuk
A D Dashitsyrenova
N A Kostenko
O O Sinitsina
M P Shevyreva
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):717-21
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Hazardous Substances - analysis
Humans
National Health Programs - legislation & jurisprudence
Policy Making
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Russia
Abstract
The realization of the package of measures directed at the consecutive decrease of the negative effect of hazardous chemical and biological factors on the population and environment to the acceptable risk level stipulates the development of standard legal regulation in the field of ensuring the chemical and biological safety. For this purpose article presents substantiation and conceptual approaches to the creation of legislation in the field of the chemical and biological security of the Russian Federation within the pursued state policy. In determination of conceptual approaches, in the article there are reported: the main idea, the purpose, a subject of legal regulation, the circle of people who will be subjected to the laws, the place offuture laws in the system of current legislation, the provisions of the Constitution of the Russian Federation, the Federal backbone laws of the Russian Federation to realization of which laws are directed, there is given the general characteristic and an assessment of a condition of legal regulation in this field, results of the analysis of the information on the need for correspondence of Russian laws to provision of international treaties, concerning prohibitions of the biological and chemical weapon, safe handling with biological agents and chemicals, and also the development of uniform procedures of ensuring chemical and biological safety. The major aspect in the shaping of the legislation is the global character ofproblems of chemical and biological safety in this connection in article there is indicated the need of rapprochement of rules of law for this area with partners in economic cooperation and integration. Taking into account an orientation of future laws on the decrease in the level of the negative impact of dangerous chemical and biological factors on the population and environment, there are designated medical, social, economic and political consequences of their implementation. There are presented the proposed structure for bills: “About biological safety”, “On Chemical Safety” and “On the National collection of pathogens.
PubMed ID
29430893 View in PubMed
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[About the legal regulation of health care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114252
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2012 Nov-Dec;(6):7-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
D V Yefremov
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2012 Nov-Dec;(6):7-10
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Policy
Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Russia
Abstract
The adoption of the law "About foundations of population health care in the Russian Federation" in absence of concept of health care development determining the major targets and tasks of the sector gives rise in citizen incomprehension and rejection of innovations of health policy. To determine the vector of development of Russian health care as compared with Soviet system of health care the analysis of particular positions of the Federal law "On foundations of population health care" (2011) and the USSR law "On approval of foundations of legislation of USSR and Union republics on health care" (1969) is made.
PubMed ID
23634600 View in PubMed
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Affected by the tooth of time: legislation on infectious diseases control in five European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50220
Source
Med Law. 1993;12(1-2):101-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
J. Dute
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, Free University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Source
Med Law. 1993;12(1-2):101-8
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communicable Disease Control - legislation & jurisprudence
Comparative Study
Compensation and Redress
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Europe
Government Regulation
Humans
Internationality
Mandatory Programs
Patient Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The exercise of compulsory powers for the protection of society against the spread of infectious diseases may impose severe restrictions on individual liberty. The law should therefore enable public health officials to strike the proper balance between public health and individual rights. An overview of the infectious diseases control legislation of five European countries (Germany, Switzerland, England, Sweden and the Netherlands) shows outdated medical approaches to infectious diseases, deficiencies in substantive statutory criteria and a lack of suitable procedural protection. The law has to be modified not only to fit current epidemiological insights, but also to give full weight to evolving individual rights.
PubMed ID
8377600 View in PubMed
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AIDS, public health and the law: a case of structural coupling?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7411
Source
Eur J Health Law. 1999 Sep;6(3):213-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Source
J Health Polit Policy Law. 2008 Apr;33(2):281-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Benjamin Mason Meier
James G Hodge
Kristine M Gebbie
Author Affiliation
Columbia University, New York, USA.
Source
J Health Polit Policy Law. 2008 Apr;33(2):281-93
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Health Policy
Humans
Organizational Case Studies
Politics
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Public Health Practice - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The Turning Point Model State Public Health Act (Turning Point Act), published in September 2003, provides a comprehensive template for states seeking public health law modernization. This case study examines the political and policy efforts undertaken in Alaska following the development of the Turning Point Act. It is the first in a series of case studies to assess states' consideration of the Turning Point Act for the purpose of public health law reform. Through a comparative analysis of these case studies and ongoing legislative tracking in all fifty states, researchers can assess (1) how states codify the Turning Point Act into state law and (2) how these modernized state laws influence or change public health practice, leading to improved health outcomes.
PubMed ID
18325901 View in PubMed
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Analysis of factors related to development, regulatory level and change in municipal no-smoking by-laws in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191900
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Nov-Dec;92(6):412-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Lacchetti
T. Abernathy
Author Affiliation
Central West Health Planning Information Network, 10 George Street, Suite 301B, Hamilton, ON, L8P 1C8.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Nov-Dec;92(6):412-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Local Government
Ontario
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
This study explored and measured the presence, content and growth of municipal no-smoking by-laws and examined factors related to differences in by-law breadth and comprehensiveness.
By-laws from each jurisdiction across Ontario were collected and scored relative to their breadth and restrictiveness using the Asbridge-O'Grady Index. Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance was used to compare the distributions of municipal characteristics among the regulatory level of municipal smoking legislation.
Twenty-three percent of Ontario municipalities (215/951) had enacted smoking by-laws by the end of 1998 compared to 18% (169/951) in 1994. Larger municipalities tend to be significantly more restrictive than smaller municipalities.
No-smoking legislation has become more extensive and restrictive in Ontario since the passage of the 1994 Tobacco Control Act. There was little legislative variability among the regions that contained tobacco-producing municipalities and those that did not.
PubMed ID
11799543 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jul-Aug;100(4):244
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gilles Paradis
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jul-Aug;100(4):244
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Population Groups - legislation & jurisprudence
Prejudice
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Justice - legislation & jurisprudence
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2009 Sep-Oct;100(5):39719994747
Comment On: Can J Public Health. 2009 Jul-Aug;100(4):258-6219722337
PubMed ID
19722333 View in PubMed
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Are xenotransplantation safeguards legally viable?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179521
Source
Berkeley Technol Law J. 2001;16 Suppl:937-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
P S Florencio
E D Ramanathan
Author Affiliation
Proskauer Rose LLP, New York, NY, USA. pflorencio@proskauer.com
Source
Berkeley Technol Law J. 2001;16 Suppl:937-77
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood Specimen Collection
Canada
Civil Rights
Coercion
Government Regulation
Humans
Infection Control - legislation & jurisprudence
Internationality
Jurisprudence
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Transplantation - legislation & jurisprudence
Transplantation, Heterologous - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence
United States
Abstract
Scientists agree on the need for robust public health safeguards to accompany the imminent introduction of xenotransplantation--clinical transplantation of animal tissue into humans. To protect society in the event of emerging infectious diseases, governments must devise a legally effective means of ensuring compliance with such safeguards. Neither consent law, the law of contracts, nor existing public health legislation can adequately enforce such compliance. Consent law serves as a mechanism of communicating the momentary waiver of legal rights, not as a durable enforcement doctrine. Because it would be essential for recipients personally to comply with public safety measures, the law of contracts would also be unable to compel compliance. Existing public health legislation would also likely be ineffective because it would need to be substantially amended to incorporate the heightened powers necessary for the periodic examination of asymptomatic xenotransplant recipients. Xenotransplantation-specific legislation would be a legally effective means of enforcing public health safeguards since it could require conforming behaviors and could impose monetary fines on those recipients who, having benefited from life-saving intervention, fail to comply. This Article argues that legislation implementing a post-xenotransplantation surveillance system should withstand constitutional scrutiny because it would not be discriminatory and because, although it would violate fundamental rights of recipients, such violations would be justified under existing constitutional doctrines.
PubMed ID
15212014 View in PubMed
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Benefits of Water Safety Plans: microbiology, compliance, and public health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123644
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Jul 17;46(14):7782-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-17-2012
Author
Maria J Gunnarsdottir
Sigurdur M Gardarsson
Mark Elliott
Gudrun Sigmundsdottir
Jamie Bartram
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Iceland, Hjardarhaga 2-6, 107 Reykjavik, Iceland. mariag@hi.is
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Jul 17;46(14):7782-9
Date
Jul-17-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colony Count, Microbial
Diarrhea - epidemiology
Drinking Water - microbiology - standards
Guideline Adherence - standards
Heterotrophic Processes
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Logistic Models
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Control, Formal
Water Microbiology - standards
Water Quality - standards
Water Supply - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The Water Safety Plan (WSP) methodology, which aims to enhance safety of drinking water supplies, has been recommended by the World Health Organization since 2004. WSPs are now used worldwide and are legally required in several countries. However, there is limited systematic evidence available demonstrating the effectiveness of WSPs on water quality and health. Iceland was one of the first countries to legislate the use of WSPs, enabling the analysis of more than a decade of data on impact of WSP. The objective was to determine the impact of WSP implementation on regulatory compliance, microbiological water quality, and incidence of clinical cases of diarrhea. Surveillance data on water quality and diarrhea were collected and analyzed. The results show that HPC (heterotrophic plate counts), representing microbiological growth in the water supply system, decreased statistically significant with fewer incidents of HPC exceeding 10 cfu per mL in samples following WSP implementation and noncompliance was also significantly reduced (p
PubMed ID
22679926 View in PubMed
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British Columbia capital regional district 100% smokefree bylaw: a successful public health campaign despite industry opposition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183788
Source
Tob Control. 2003 Sep;12(3):264-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
J. Drope
S. Glantz
Author Affiliation
Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, Institute for Health Policy Studies and Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco 94143-1390, USA.
Source
Tob Control. 2003 Sep;12(3):264-8
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Health education
Health Policy
Humans
Professional Role
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Smoking - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Tobacco Industry
Abstract
To describe how the British Columbia Capital Regional District successfully passed, implemented, and enforced a 100% smokefree bylaw in all public places, including restaurants and bars, despite an aggressive campaign by the tobacco industry (acting through the hospitality industry) to stop it.
Information was obtained from news reports, internal tobacco industry documents, reports, public documents, and interviews with key players. Tobacco industry documents were accessed between February and April 2002. This project was approved by the University of California San Francisco committee on human research.
As in the USA and elsewhere in the world, the tobacco industry in British Columbia, Canada, recruited and created hospitality associations to fight against the district smokefree bylaw. They used the classic industry rhetoric of individual rights and freedoms, economic devastation, and ventilation as a solution. Public health authorities were able to counter industry strategies with a strong education campaign, well written bylaws, and persistent enforcement.
It is possible to overcome serious opposition orchestrated by the tobacco industry and develop and implement a 100% smokefree bylaw in Canada. Doing so requires attention to detail in drafting the bylaw, as well as a public education campaign on the health dangers of secondhand smoke and active enforcement to overcome organised resistance to the bylaw. Jurisdictions considering smokefree bylaws should anticipate this opposition when developing and implementing their bylaws.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2001 Feb;91(2):245-5211211633
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2001 Apr;91(4):598-60311291372
Cites: Tob Control. 2001 Jun;10(2):154-6011387536
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2001 Aug;55(8):588-9411449018
Cites: Tob Control. 2001 Sep;10(3):218-2411544384
Cites: Tob Control. 2001 Dec;10(4):329-3611740023
Cites: Tob Control. 1997 Spring;6(1):41-549176985
Cites: Tob Control. 2002 Jun;11(2):94-10412034999
Cites: BMJ. 2002 Jul 27;325(7357):18812142305
Cites: Tob Control. 2003 Mar;12(1):13-2012612356
Cites: JAMA. 1991 Oct 16;266(15):2110-71920699
Cites: JAMA. 1993 Jul 28;270(4):479-868320788
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1994 Jul;84(7):1081-58017529
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2002 Feb;92(2):257-6511818302
PubMed ID
12958385 View in PubMed
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140 records – page 1 of 14.