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28 records – page 1 of 3.

[Acceptability of harm reduction interventions: contributions of members of the population to the debate about public health ethics].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152246
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jan-Feb;100(1):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Eve Dubé
Raymond Massé
Lina Noël
Author Affiliation
Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Québec. eve.dube@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jan-Feb;100(1):24-8
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Drug Users - psychology
Female
Government Programs - ethics
Harm Reduction - ethics
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Needle-Exchange Programs - ethics
Public Health - ethics
Public Opinion
Quebec
Social Control Policies - ethics
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - microbiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore convergence and divergence in ethical stances of public health and of members of the population regarding acceptability of harm reduction interventions, in particular needle exchange programs.
Forty-nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with French-speaking residents of Quebec City. Content analysis was done to explore the views of the respondents with regard to injection drug users (IDUs) and interventions addressed to them, as well as Quebec policies on harm reduction.
Four main categories of social representations about IDUs have emerged from the discourses of the respondents. IDU were represented as: suffering from a disease (n = 17); victim of a situation that they could not control (n = 14); having chosen to use drugs (n = 12); or delinquent people (n = 6). Those social representations were associated with different ethical stances regarding acceptability of harm reduction interventions. Main divergences between respondents' ethical positions on harm reduction and public health discourses were related to the value of tolerance and its limits.
The Quebec City population interviewed in this study had a high level of tolerance regarding needle distribution to drug addicts. Applied ethics could be a useful way to understand citizens' interpretation of public health interventions.
PubMed ID
19263971 View in PubMed
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Appeals to individual responsibility for health--reconsidering the luck egalitarian perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115446
Source
Camb Q Healthc Ethics. 2013 Apr;22(2):146-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013

Ban all production and export of chrysotile asbestos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138070
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Sep-Oct;101(5):352
Publication Type
Article

Bernard Dickens: bespoke public health, law and ethics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175435
Source
J Law Med Ethics. 2004;32(4):549-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Alexander Morgan Capron
Author Affiliation
Department of Ethics, Trade, Human Rights, and Health Law, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
Source
J Law Med Ethics. 2004;32(4):549-50
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bioethical Issues - history
Canada
England
History, 20th Century
Humans
Legislation, Medical - history
Public Health - ethics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
15807342 View in PubMed
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A critical public-health ethics analysis of Canada's international response to HIV.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136313
Source
Glob Public Health. 2011;6(7):777-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Stephanie A Nixon
Solomon R Benatar
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 160-500 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 1V7, Canada. stephanie.nixon@utoronto.ca
Source
Glob Public Health. 2011;6(7):777-93
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
HIV Infections
Humans
International Cooperation
Interviews as Topic
Male
Public Health - ethics
Abstract
As interconnections between health, ideology and politics become increasingly acknowledged, gaps in the literature also become visible in terms of analytic frameworks to engage these issues and empirical studies to understand the complexities. 'Critical public-health ethics' provides such an analytic lens. This article presents the results of a critical public-health ethics analysis of the government of Canada's international response to HIV. This qualitative study involved in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 23 experts on Canada's international response over time. Descriptive, thematic and theoretical analyses revealed an underlying dilemma between Canada's philanthropic desire to 'do the right thing' for the broader public good and Canada's commitment to its own economic growth and other forms of self-interest. Related to this tension were four conspicuous areas of silence in the data: (1) The relative absence of moral vocabulary for discussing Canada's duty to respond to the global HIV pandemic. (2) Scant reference to solutions based on poverty reduction. (3) Little awareness about the dominance of neoliberal economic rationality and its impact on HIV. (4) Limited understanding of Canada's function within the international economic order in terms of its role in poverty creation. Our study has implications for Canada and other rich nations through its empirical contribution to the chorus of calls challenging the legitimised, institutionalised and normative practice of considering the economic growth of wealthy countries as the primary objective of global economic policy.
PubMed ID
21390963 View in PubMed
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Critical public health ethics and Canada's role in global health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170425
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Jan-Feb;97(1):32-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Stephanie A Nixon
Author Affiliation
University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. stephanie.nixon@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Jan-Feb;97(1):32-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Developed Countries
Developing Countries - economics
HIV Infections - prevention & control
Health Policy
Humans
International Cooperation
Public Health - ethics
Social Justice
Social Values
World Health
Abstract
This commentary introduces critical public health ethics as an innovative lens for considering Canada's role in global health. Arising from the relatively young field of public health ethics, this analytic perspective sheds light on questions regarding public health policy, research and practice that often remain shaded from view because of traditional ways of thinking about public health. The advantage of a critical public health ethics lens is illustrated through the example of Canada's role in scaling up access to HIV treatments in developing countries.
PubMed ID
16512324 View in PubMed
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Ethical challenges experienced by public health nurses related to adolescents' use of visual technologies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310739
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2019 Sep; 26(6):1822-1833
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2019
Author
Hilde Laholt
Kim McLeod
Marilys Guillemin
Ellinor Beddari
Geir Lorem
Author Affiliation
UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2019 Sep; 26(6):1822-1833
Date
Sep-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Ethics, Nursing
Focus Groups - methods
Humans
Norway
Nurses, Public Health - ethics
Qualitative Research
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
Visual technologies are central to youth culture and are often the preferred communication means of adolescents. Although these tools can be beneficial in fostering relations, adolescents' use of visual technologies and social media also raises ethical concerns.
We explored how school public health nurses identify and resolve the ethical challenges involved in the use of visual technologies in health dialogues with adolescents.
This is a qualitative study utilizing data from focus group discussions.
We conducted focus group discussions using two semi-structured discussion guides with seven groups of public health nurses (n = 40) working in Norwegian school health services. The data were collected during January and October 2016. Discussions were audio recorded, transcribed, and coded into themes and subthemes using systematic text condensation.
The leader of the public health nursing service who agreed to provide access for the study and the Norwegian Center for Research Data that reviewed and approved the study. All participants gave informed consent.
In adolescents' use of visual materials with public health nurses, ethical concerns were raised regarding suicide ideations, socially unacceptable content, violation of privacy, and presentations of possible child neglect. The nurses utilized their professional knowledge and experience when identifying and navigating these ethical dilemmas; they resolved ethical uncertainties through peer discussion and collaboration with fellow nurses and other professionals.
We discussed the findings in light of Annemarie Mol's interpretation of the ethics of care. Mol expands the notion of ethical care to include the action of technologies.
Although the increasing use of visual technologies offered benefits, school nurses faced ethical challenges in health dialogues with adolescents. To address and navigate these ethical issues, they relied on their experience and caring practices based on their professional ethics. Uncertainties were resolved through peer dialogue and guidance.
PubMed ID
29895221 View in PubMed
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[Ethical considerations of a public health intervention aimed at reducing the risk of HIV transmission in HIV-seropositive-populations who are unwilling to take precautions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147890
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Mar-Apr;100(2):113-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Alix Adrien
David J Roy
Author Affiliation
Direction de santé publique de Montréal, Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Mar-Apr;100(2):113-5
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Ethics, Medical
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology - transmission
Health Personnel
Humans
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Program Evaluation
Public Health - ethics
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
1) To describe a public health intervention aimed at reducing the risk of HIV transmission by seropositive people who are unwilling or unable to take precautions to counter HIV transmission; 2) To document ethical principles that help front-line health care professionals arrive at justifiable decisions and actions.
Front-line health care professionals dealing with these cases.
Intervention developed by la Direction de la santé publique de l'Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montreal.
A comité d'aide aux intervenants (CAI) was struck to advise health care professionals. To document the ethical principles that help front-line health care professionals in these situations, we undertook a multiple case study based on the committee's approach to counselling care providers for each of the 26 cases dealt with by the CAI between November 1996 and January 2003.
We identified 7 ethical pitfalls: expecting immediate ideal results; simplification of complex situations; generalizing uncritically from a particular case; uncritical ethical bias against coercive measures; inability or refusal to recognize and accept limits; failure to anticipate unintended consequences of an action; acting on incomplete, unvalidated, or unverifiable information.
A process of mutually exercised critical reflection can help health care professionals to identify and avoid ethical pitfalls and arrive at justifiable decisions and actions.
PubMed ID
19839286 View in PubMed
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Ethics, equality and evidence in health promotion Danish guidelines for municipalities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269677
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Jun;42(4):337-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Signild Vallgårda
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Jun;42(4):337-43
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cities
Denmark
Evidence-Based Practice
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health status
Humans
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Public Health - ethics
Social Justice
Abstract
The Danish National Board of Health has expressed its commitment to social equality in health, evidence-informed health promotion and public health ethics, and has issued guidelines for municipalities on health promotion, in Danish named prevention packages. The aim of this article is to analyse whether the Board of Health adheres to ideals of equality, evidence and ethics in these guidelines.
An analysis to detect statements about equity, evidence and ethics in 10 health promotion packages directed at municipalities with the aim of guiding the municipalities towards evidence-informed disease prevention and health promotion.
Despite declared intentions of prioritizing social equality in health, these intentions are largely absent from most of the packages. When health inequalities are mentioned, focus is on the disadvantaged or the marginalized. Several interventions are recommended, where there is no evidence to support them, notwithstanding the ambition of interventions being evidence-informed. Ethical considerations are scanty, scattered and unsystematically integrated. Further, although some packages mention the importance of avoiding stigmatization, there is little indicating how this could be done.
Including reduction of health inequalities and evidence-informed and ethically defendable interventions in health promotion is a challenge, which is not yet fully met by the National Board of Health. When judged from liberal ethical principles, only few of the suggested interventions are acceptable, i.e., those concerning information, but from a paternalistic view, all interventions that may actually benefit the citizens are justified.
PubMed ID
24608091 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.