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An estimation of Canada's public health physician workforce.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150463
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 May-Jun;100(3):199-203
Publication Type
Article
Author
Margaret L Russell
Lynn McIntyre
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Dr. NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4N1. mlrussel@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 May-Jun;100(3):199-203
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Certification
Civil Defense
Community Medicine - manpower
Data Collection
Disaster planning
Emergency Medicine - manpower
Health Manpower - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Occupational Medicine - manpower
Pediatrics - manpower
Physicians - supply & distribution
Public Health - education - manpower
Public Health Administration - manpower
Questionnaires
Abstract
Public health emergency planning includes a consideration of public health human resource requirements. We addressed the hypothetical question: How many public health physicians could Canada mobilize in the event of a public health emergency?
We used the 2004 National Physician Survey (NPS) to estimate the number of public health physicians in Canada. Using weighting to account for non-response, we estimated the numbers and population estimates of public health physicians who were active versus 'in reserve'. We explored the impact of using diverse definitions of public health physician based upon NPS questions on professional activity, self-reported degrees and certifications, and physician database classifications.
Of all Canadian physicians, an estimated 769 (1.3%) are qualified to practice public health by virtue of degrees and certifications relevant to public health, of whom 367 (48%) also report active 'community medicine/public health' practice. Even among Canada's 382 Community Medicine specialists, only 60% report active public health practice.
The estimation of the size of Canada's public health physician workforce is currently limited by the lack of a clear definition and appropriate monitoring. It appears that, even with a reserve public health physician workforce that would almost double its numbers, Canada's available workforce is only 40% of projected requirements. Public health emergency preparedness planning exercises should clearly delineate public health physician roles and needs, and action should be taken accordingly to enhance the numbers of Canadian public health physicians and their capacity to meet these requirements.
PubMed ID
19507722 View in PubMed
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Are schools of public health needed to address public health workforce development in Canada for the 21st century?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168390
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):248-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ted H Tulchinsky
M Joan Bickford
Author Affiliation
Braun School of Public Health, Hebrew University-Hadassah, Ein Kerem, Jerusalem, Israel.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):248-50
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation
Canada
Europe
Health Manpower - trends
Humans
Needs Assessment
Public Health - education - manpower
Public Health Administration
Schools, Public Health - standards - supply & distribution
United States
Abstract
In addition to establishing Canadian federal institutions for public health to work in cooperation with provincial and local health authorities, the infrastructure of public health for the future depends on a multi-disciplinary and well-prepared workforce. Traditionally, Canada trained its public health workforce in schools of public health (or hygiene), but in recent decades this has been carried out in departments and centres primarily within medical faculties. Recent public health crises in Canada have led to some new federal institutions and reorganization of public health activities as well as other reforms. This commentary proposes re-examination of the context of public health workforce training and especially for schools of public health as independent faculties within universities as in the United States or, as developed more recently in Europe, semi-independent schools within medical faculties. The multi-disciplinary nature of public health professionals and the complex challenges of the "New Public Health" call for a new debate on this vital issue of public health workforce development. Public health needs a new image and higher profile of training, research and service to meet provincial and national needs, based on international standards of accreditation and recognition.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):251-416827419
PubMed ID
16827418 View in PubMed
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Public health nutrition practice in Canada: a situational assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159349
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2008 Aug;11(8):773-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Ann Fox
Cathy Chenhall
Marie Traynor
Cindy Scythes
Jane Bellman
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3E2. ann.fox@utoronto.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2008 Aug;11(8):773-81
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Dietetics - education - manpower - standards
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Leadership
Nutrition Policy
Patient care team
Professional Competence
Public Health - education - manpower - standards
Public Health Administration - education - manpower - standards
Public Policy
Staff Development
Abstract
Renewed focus on public health has brought about considerable interest in workforce development among public health nutrition professionals in Canada. The present article describes a situational assessment of public health nutrition practice in Canada that will be used to guide future workforce development efforts.
A situational assessment is a planning approach that considers strengths and opportunities as well as needs and challenges, and emphasizes stakeholder participation. This situational assessment consisted of four components: a systematic review of literature on public health nutrition workforce issues; key informant interviews; a PEEST (political, economic, environmental, social, technological) factor analysis; and a consensus meeting.
Information gathered from these sources identified key nutrition and health concerns of the population; the need to define public health nutrition practice, roles and functions; demand for increased training, education and leadership opportunities; inconsistent qualification requirements across the country; and the desire for a common vision among practitioners.
Findings of the situational assessment were used to create a three-year public health nutrition workforce development strategy. Specific objectives of the strategy are to define public health nutrition practice in Canada, develop competencies, collaborate with other disciplines, and begin to establish a new professional group or leadership structure to promote and enhance public health nutrition practice. The process of conducting the situational assessment not only provided valuable information for planning purposes, but also served as an effective mechanism for engaging stakeholders and building consensus.
PubMed ID
18194588 View in PubMed
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Rethinking schools of public health: a strategic alliance model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168389
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):251-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Brent W Moloughney
Harvey A Skinner
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):251-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Health Manpower
Humans
Needs Assessment
Program Development
Public Health - education - manpower
Public Health Administration
Schools, Public Health - organization & administration - standards - supply & distribution
Abstract
Canada is in the midst of rejuvenation of public health organizations, mandates and infrastructure. Major planning exercises are underway regarding public health human resources, where academic institutions have a key role to play. To what extent could schools of public health be part of the solution? Many universities across Canada are considering or in the process of implementing MPH programs (some 17 programs planned and/or underway) and possible schools of public health. However, concerns are raised about critical mass, quality and standards. We encourage innovation and debate about ways to enhance collaborative and structural arrangements for education programs. A school of public health model might emerge from this, but so too might other models. Also, novel types of organizational structure need consideration. One example is a "strategic alliance" model that is broad-based, integrative and adaptive--building on the interdisciplinary focus needed for addressing public health concerns in the 21st century. From our perspective, the central question is: what (new) types of organizational structures and, equally important, collaborative networks will enable Canada to strengthen its public health workforce so that it may better address local and global challenges to public health?
Notes
Comment On: Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):248-5016827418
PubMed ID
16827419 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Istor Med. 1996 Nov-Dec;(6):38-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
N A Kapitonenko
V G D'iachenko
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Istor Med. 1996 Nov-Dec;(6):38-40
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Care Reform
Health Occupations - education
Humans
Public Health - education - manpower
Public Health Administration - education - manpower
Russia
Abstract
The solution of the staff problem arising because of reformation of medical education and organization of training of specialists in new fields of medicine, required by the market, is a necessary prerequisite for the realization of the concept of population health protection. The authors share their experience gained in the training of specialists in accordance with the requirements of the reform at medical institutes of the Far East.
PubMed ID
9235269 View in PubMed
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[Time for public health medicine to become a new basic specialty. Or is public health thinking within Swedish medicine over?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188037
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Sep 26;99(39):3872-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-26-2002
Author
Sven Larsson
Author Affiliation
Nationellt kunskapscentrum för prioritering inom vård och omsorg, Linköping. sven.larsson@orebroll.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Sep 26;99(39):3872-3
Date
Sep-26-2002
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Medicine
Education, Medical, Continuing
Humans
Public Health - education - manpower - trends
Sweden
PubMed ID
12395540 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.