Skip header and navigation

Refine By

112 records – page 1 of 12.

Addressing the health care needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182105
Source
Am J Public Health. 2004 Jan;94(1):13-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Ruth J Katz
Source
Am J Public Health. 2004 Jan;94(1):13-4
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Public Health - education
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
United States Indian Health Service
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2004 Jan;94(1):53-914713698
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Aug 11;282(6):583-910450723
Comment On: Am J Public Health. 2004 Jan;94(1):53-914713698
PubMed ID
14713686 View in PubMed
Less detail

An approach to the assessment of learning needs for physician-managers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235444
Source
J Health Adm Educ. 1986;4(4):629-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
T. Myers
P. Leatt
W. Bonus
Source
J Health Adm Educ. 1986;4(4):629-43
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection
Hospital Administration - education
Humans
Physician Executives
Psychiatry - education
Public Health - education
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
In recent years physicians have become increasingly involved in the decision-making and policy-making processes in hospitals and other health service organizations. Consequently, there is a growing awareness of the need for specialized education programs for physicians who have managerial responsibilities. While education programs in management for physicians have been available in Britain and the United States for a number of years, relatively few programs have existed in Canada. Typically, physicians who have assumed administrative positions either within the medical staff organization or within the hospital's management structure have received no formal training in management. This article examines reasons for the increased demand for management education for physicians in Canada, specific needs of physicians in the area of management education, and the assessment of needs for management education programs.
PubMed ID
10316142 View in PubMed
Less detail

An estimation of Canada's public health physician workforce.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150463
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 May-Jun;100(3):199-203
Publication Type
Article
Author
Margaret L Russell
Lynn McIntyre
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Dr. NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4N1. mlrussel@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 May-Jun;100(3):199-203
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Certification
Civil Defense
Community Medicine - manpower
Data Collection
Disaster planning
Emergency Medicine - manpower
Health Manpower - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Occupational Medicine - manpower
Pediatrics - manpower
Physicians - supply & distribution
Public Health - education - manpower
Public Health Administration - manpower
Questionnaires
Abstract
Public health emergency planning includes a consideration of public health human resource requirements. We addressed the hypothetical question: How many public health physicians could Canada mobilize in the event of a public health emergency?
We used the 2004 National Physician Survey (NPS) to estimate the number of public health physicians in Canada. Using weighting to account for non-response, we estimated the numbers and population estimates of public health physicians who were active versus 'in reserve'. We explored the impact of using diverse definitions of public health physician based upon NPS questions on professional activity, self-reported degrees and certifications, and physician database classifications.
Of all Canadian physicians, an estimated 769 (1.3%) are qualified to practice public health by virtue of degrees and certifications relevant to public health, of whom 367 (48%) also report active 'community medicine/public health' practice. Even among Canada's 382 Community Medicine specialists, only 60% report active public health practice.
The estimation of the size of Canada's public health physician workforce is currently limited by the lack of a clear definition and appropriate monitoring. It appears that, even with a reserve public health physician workforce that would almost double its numbers, Canada's available workforce is only 40% of projected requirements. Public health emergency preparedness planning exercises should clearly delineate public health physician roles and needs, and action should be taken accordingly to enhance the numbers of Canadian public health physicians and their capacity to meet these requirements.
PubMed ID
19507722 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are schools of public health needed to address public health workforce development in Canada for the 21st century?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168390
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):248-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ted H Tulchinsky
M Joan Bickford
Author Affiliation
Braun School of Public Health, Hebrew University-Hadassah, Ein Kerem, Jerusalem, Israel.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):248-50
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation
Canada
Europe
Health Manpower - trends
Humans
Needs Assessment
Public Health - education - manpower
Public Health Administration
Schools, Public Health - standards - supply & distribution
United States
Abstract
In addition to establishing Canadian federal institutions for public health to work in cooperation with provincial and local health authorities, the infrastructure of public health for the future depends on a multi-disciplinary and well-prepared workforce. Traditionally, Canada trained its public health workforce in schools of public health (or hygiene), but in recent decades this has been carried out in departments and centres primarily within medical faculties. Recent public health crises in Canada have led to some new federal institutions and reorganization of public health activities as well as other reforms. This commentary proposes re-examination of the context of public health workforce training and especially for schools of public health as independent faculties within universities as in the United States or, as developed more recently in Europe, semi-independent schools within medical faculties. The multi-disciplinary nature of public health professionals and the complex challenges of the "New Public Health" call for a new debate on this vital issue of public health workforce development. Public health needs a new image and higher profile of training, research and service to meet provincial and national needs, based on international standards of accreditation and recognition.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97(3):251-416827419
PubMed ID
16827418 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97 Suppl 2:S43-6
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Author
Irving Rootman
Peggy Edwards
Author Affiliation
Centre for Community Health Promotion Research, University of Victoria, Box 3060, STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3R4. irootman@uvic.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97 Suppl 2:S43-6
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Cooperative Behavior
Cultural Diversity
Educational Status
Ethnic Groups - education
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy
Health Priorities
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services Research
Humans
Power (Psychology)
Public Health - education
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This concluding article comments on what we learned from the conference, what we still need to know, and what we need to do now. It describes what participants said about the impact of the conference and the follow-up steps that have been taken so far. In terms of what we learned, there was agreement on the importance of culture in understanding literacy and health literacy; the importance of context; the integral relationship between literacy and health literacy and the concept of "empowerment;" the value of efforts to improve health through literacy and health literacy; and the need for collaboration. We need more and better information on how our various efforts are working; the cost of low literacy; the links between health, education, and lifelong learning; the needs and strengths of Aboriginal people, and the perspectives of Francophone and ethnocultural groups. Specific topics worthy of pursuit are suggested. They are followed by a list of recommendations from the conference related to focussing on language and culture, and to building best practices, knowledge, and healthy public policy. The paper presents some findings from the conference evaluation, which suggests that the conference met its goals. It concludes by reporting on actions that have been taken to implement the conference recommendations, including the establishment of a Health Literacy Expert Committee and the submission of several funding proposals.
PubMed ID
16805161 View in PubMed
Less detail

Being global in public health practice and research: complementary competencies are needed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130127
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Sep-Oct;102(5):394-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Donald C Cole
Colleen Davison
Lori Hanson
Suzanne F Jackson
Ashley Page
Raphael Lencuch
Ritz Kakuma
Author Affiliation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON. donald.cole@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Sep-Oct;102(5):394-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Internationality
Professional Competence
Public Health - education - standards
Public Health Practice - standards
Abstract
Different sets of competencies in public health, global health and research have recently emerged, including the Core Competencies for Public Health in Canada (CCPHC). Within this context, we believe it is important to articulate competencies for globalhealth practitioners-educators and researchers that are in addition to those outlined in the CCPHC. In global health, we require knowledge and skills regarding: north-south power dynamics, linkages between local and global health problems, and the roles of international organizations. We must be able to work responsibly in low-resource settings, foster self-determination in a world rife with power differentials, and engage in dialogue with stakeholders globally. Skills in cross-cultural communication and the ability to critically self-reflect on one's own social location within the global context are essential. Those in global health must be committed to improving health equity through global systems changes and be willing to be mentored and to mentor others across borders. We call for dialogue on these competencies and for development of ways to assess both their demonstration in academic settings and their performance in global health practice and research.
PubMed ID
22032108 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bridging the gap in population health for rural and Aboriginal communities: a needs assessment of public health training for rural primary care physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164068
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2007;12(2):81-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Jane A Buxton
Veronic Ouellette
Alison Brazier
Carl Whiteside
Rick Mathias
Meena Dawar
Andrea Mulkins
Author Affiliation
The Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2007;12(2):81-8
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Clinical Competence
Communication
Community Medicine
Community-Institutional Relations
Cultural Characteristics
Focus Groups
Humans
Indians, North American
Interviews as Topic
Physicians, Family - economics - education
Population Groups
Public Health - education
Rural Health Services
Sampling Studies
Abstract
The literature identifies significant inequalities in the health status of rural and Aboriginal populations, compared with the general population. Providing rural primary care physicians with public health skills could help address this issue since the patterns of mortality and morbidity suggest that prevention and health promotion play an important role. However, we were unable to identify any community needs assessment for such professionals with dual skills that had been performed in Canada.
We conducted key informant interviews and focus groups in 3 rural and Aboriginal communities in British Columbia (chosen through purposive sampling). We analyzed transcripts following standard qualitative iterative methodologies to extract themes and for discussing content.
There was broad support for a program to train primary care physicians in public health. The characteristics identified as necessary in such a physician included a long-term commitment to the community with partnership building, advocacy, communication and cultural sensitivity skills. The communities we studied identified some priority challenges, most notably that the current remuneration structure does not support physicians engaging in public health or research.
There is great potential and support for the training of rural primary care practitioners in public health to improve population health and engage communities in this process.
PubMed ID
17442135 View in PubMed
Less detail

BRIMHEALTH. A successful experience in Nordic-Baltic co-operation in public health training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189720
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2002 Jun;12(2):152-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Lennart Köhler
Leena Eklund
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Box 12133, S-402 42 Göteborg, Sweden. lennart@nhv.se
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2002 Jun;12(2):152-4
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Baltic States
Education, Graduate - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Public Health - education
Scandinavia
PubMed ID
12073755 View in PubMed
Less detail

Brokering: a process for establishing long-term and stable links with gay male communities for research and public health education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218960
Source
AIDS Educ Prev. 1994 Feb;6(1):65-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
A J Silvestre
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, PA.
Source
AIDS Educ Prev. 1994 Feb;6(1):65-73
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bisexuality
Consumer Participation
Epidemiologic Methods
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Health Education - organization & administration
Homosexuality
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Marketing of Health Services - organization & administration
Motivation
Negotiating
Patient compliance
Professional-Patient Relations
Public Health - education
Research
Abstract
The success of efforts to prevent continued transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and to increase compliance with HIV prophylactic interventions among homosexual and bisexual men will depend in part on health care professionals' understanding of and ability to establish linkages with these men. In order to recruit men into a research project and an educational program, staff at the Pitt Men's Study, an epidemiological investigation of HIV infection, developed a process described here as "brokering," which was based on community organizing and marketing principles. Brokering is a dynamic process by which researchers and public health professionals exchange goods and services with formal and informal leaders of the gay community in order to establish strong, long-term linkages. To date, this process yielded 2,989 homosexual and bisexual recruits into the study, which began in 1983. After 8 years, 79% of those still alive continue to return for follow-up. While recruitment techniques will need to vary from city to city, the importance of establishing linkages with the local indigenous leadership remains of major importance.
PubMed ID
8024944 View in PubMed
Less detail

112 records – page 1 of 12.