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140 records – page 1 of 14.

Accounting for the contribution of vitamin B to Canada's WWII effort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138851
Source
J Hist Sociol. 2010;23(4):517-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Robyn Braun
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta.
Source
J Hist Sociol. 2010;23(4):517-41
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread - economics - history
Canada - ethnology
Flour - economics - history
Food, Fortified - economics - history
Government Programs - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
History, 20th Century
Humans
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Public Health - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Vitamin B Complex - history
Vitamin B Deficiency - ethnology - history
World War II
Abstract
Canada began to fortify its flour and bread with vitamin B when it entered the Second World War. The decision was informed by the biology of vitamin B and therefore I suggest that the complexity of this political maneuver can best be understood by considering the specificity of the biochemistry of vitamin B. In this paper I will show that the specific biology of vitamin B allowed the Canadian government the possibility of a healthier population under wartime conditions but also allowed the government a variety of means by which to develop and organize food processing practices to this end.
PubMed ID
21132948 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alaska's state public health laboratories (ASPHL): a crisis situation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210879
Source
Alaska Med. 1996 Oct-Dec;38(4):132-4, 147
Publication Type
Article
Author
G V Hayes
Author Affiliation
Section of Laboratories, Alaska Dept. of Health & Social Services, USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 1996 Oct-Dec;38(4):132-4, 147
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Cost-Benefit Analysis - trends
Forecasting
Humans
Laboratories - economics - trends
Public Health - economics - trends
PubMed ID
9124640 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Allocation of additional funds for development of public health].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231856
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1989;(9):16-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
O A Obukhov
V M Rutgaizer
B A Tolchenov
I I Vvedenskaia
E N Kulagina
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1989;(9):16-9
Date
1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Expenditures - trends
Hospitals, District - economics
Hospitals, Public
Humans
Middle Aged
Public Health - economics
Russia
Abstract
The Gorky N. A. Semashko Regional Clinical Hospital has the long-term experience in drawing additional means into patients' treatment at the expense of enterprises and collective farms on the strength of the agreement on cooperation. In order to expand cost accounting in public health it is necessary to determine cost indices in the work of curative and preventive facilities. Total cost of the provision of various types of medical services and that per patient have been calculated in the Gorky Regional Hospital. Besides current expenditure they involve the main funds, estimated by annual indices. Complete cost of 306 diagnostic and treatment procedures have been determined. Proceeding from the data obtained complete actual costs of diagnostic and treatment procedures per patient on 105 nosologic forms have been identified along with the expenditure on these nosologic forms that is necessary for modern diagnostic and treatment care.
PubMed ID
2530637 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A new paradigm of the role of hygienic science in the socioeconomic development of Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181884
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 Nov-Dec;(6):91-3
Publication Type
Article

Annual costs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Finland during 1996-2006 and a prediction model for 2007-2030.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267382
Source
NPJ Prim Care Respir Med. 2015;25:15015
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Fredrik Herse
Toni Kiljander
Lauri Lehtimäki
Source
NPJ Prim Care Respir Med. 2015;25:15015
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost of Illness
Efficiency, Organizational - economics
Finland
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Length of Stay
Models, Statistical
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Public Health - economics
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - drug therapy - economics
Abstract
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major burden for the health care system, but the exact costs are difficult to estimate and there are insufficient data available on past and future time trends of COPD-related costs.
The aim of the study was to calculate COPD-related costs in Finland during the years 1996-2006 and estimate future costs for the years 2007-2030.
COPD-related direct and indirect costs in the public health care sector of the whole of Finland during the years 1996-2006 were retrieved from national registers. In addition, we made a mathematical prediction model on COPD costs for the years 2007-2030 on the basis of population projection and changes in smoking habits.
The total annual COPD-related costs amounted to about 100-110 million Euros in 1996-2006, with no obvious change, but there was a slight decrease in direct costs and an increase in indirect costs during these years. The estimation model predicted a 60% increase up to 166 million Euros in COPD-related annual costs by the year 2030. This is caused almost entirely by an increase in direct health care costs that reflect the predicted ageing of the Finnish population, as older age is a significant factor that increases the need for hospitalisation.
The total annual COPD-related costs in Finland have been stable during the years 1996-2006, but if management strategies are not changed a significant increase in direct costs is expected by the year 2030 due to ageing of the population.
Notes
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Cites: Respir Med. 2000 Mar;94(3):247-5510783936
Cites: Respir Med. 2003 Feb;97(2):115-2212587960
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2013 Aug;41(6):570-823599377
Cites: COPD. 2005 Sep;2(3):331-917146998
Cites: Respir Med. 2007 Mar;101(3):539-4616889949
Cites: Chest. 2015 Jan;147(1):31-4525058738
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2010 Oct;36(4):766-7320693258
Cites: Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):178-8321431275
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2006 Sep;28(3):523-3216611654
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2013 Sep;42(3):559-6324000245
Cites: Respir Med. 2013 Dec;107(12):1931-823910072
Cites: COPD. 2008 Dec;5(6):347-5219353348
PubMed ID
25811648 View in PubMed
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[A place and role of an educational component in the package of measures ensuring the populations sanitary and epidemiological welfare (in case of parasitology)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156649
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2008 Apr-Jun;(2):53-6
Publication Type
Article

[Appraisal of the economic damage associated with cancer morbidity in Orenburg].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181880
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 Nov-Dec;(6):101-2
Publication Type
Article

Approved but non-funded vaccines: accessing individual protection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105476
Source
Vaccine. 2014 Feb 7;32(7):766-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-7-2014
Author
David W Scheifele
Brian J Ward
Scott A Halperin
Shelly A McNeil
Natasha S Crowcroft
Gordean Bjornson
Author Affiliation
Vaccine Evaluation Center, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Electronic address: dscheifele@cfri.ca.
Source
Vaccine. 2014 Feb 7;32(7):766-70
Date
Feb-7-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Financing, Government
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics
Humans
Immunization Programs - economics - utilization
Public Health - economics
Vaccines - economics - therapeutic use
Abstract
Funded immunization programs are best able to achieve high participation rates, optimal protection of the target population, and indirect protection of others. However, in many countries public funding of approved vaccines can be substantially delayed, limited to a portion of the at-risk population or denied altogether. In these situations, unfunded vaccines are often inaccessible to individuals at risk, allowing potentially avoidable morbidity and mortality to continue to occur. We contend that private access to approved but unfunded vaccines should be reconsidered and encouraged, with recognition that individuals have a prerogative to take advantage of a vaccine of potential benefit to them whether it is publicly funded or not. Moreover, numbers of "approved but unfunded" vaccines are likely to grow because governments will not be able to fund all future vaccines of potential benefit to some citizens. New strategies are needed to better use unfunded vaccines even though the net benefits will fall short of those of funded programs. Canada, after recent delays funding several new vaccine programs, has developed means to encourage private vaccine use. Physicians are required to inform relevant patients about risks and benefits of all recommended vaccines, publicly funded or not. Likewise, some provincial public health departments now recommend and promote both funded and unfunded vaccines. Pharmacists are key players in making unfunded vaccines locally available. Professional organizations are contributing to public and provider education about unfunded vaccines (e.g. herpes zoster, not funded in any province). Vaccine companies are gaining expertise with direct-to-consumer advertising. However, major challenges remain, such as making unfunded vaccines more available to low-income families and overcoming public expectations that all vaccines will be provided cost-free, when many other recommended personal preventive measures are user-pay. The greatest need is to change the widespread perception that approved vaccines should be publicly funded or ignored.
PubMed ID
24374500 View in PubMed
Less detail

140 records – page 1 of 14.