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Accessibility in Public Buildings: Efficiency of Checklist Protocols.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282100
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;229:101-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Jonas E Andersson
Terry Skehan
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;229:101-10
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Architectural Accessibility
Checklist - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Public Facilities
Sweden
Abstract
In Sweden, governmental agencies and bodies are required to implement a higher level of accessibility in their buildings than that stipulated by the National Building and Planning Act (PBL). The Swedish Agency for Participation (MFD, Myndigheten för delaktighet) develops holistic guidelines in order to conceptualize this higher level of accessibility. In conjunction to these guidelines, various checklist protocols have been produced. The present study focuses on the efficiency of such checklist protocols. The study revolved around the use of a checklist protocol in assessments of two buildings in Stockholm: the new head office for the National Authority for Social Insurances (ASI) and the School of Architecture at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). The study included three groups: Group 1 and Group 2 consisted of 50 real estate managers employed by the ASI, while Group 3 consisted of three participants in a course at the KTH. The results were similar in all of the groups. The use of the checklist protocol generated queries, which related mainly to two factors: (1) the accompanying factsheet consisted of textual explanations with no drawings, photographs or illustrations and (2) the order of the questions in the checklist protocol was difficult to correlate with the two buildings' spatial logic of accessing, egressing and making use of the built space.
PubMed ID
27534293 View in PubMed
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Accessibility to the public environment as perceived by teenagers with functional limitations in a south Swedish town centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190137
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2002 Apr 15;24(6):318-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2002
Author
Agneta Fänge
Susanne Iwarsson
Asa Persson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Sweden. agneta.fange@arb.lu.se
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2002 Apr 15;24(6):318-26
Date
Apr-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Architectural Accessibility
Disabled Persons - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Public Facilities - standards
Sweden
Abstract
Owing to physical inaccessibility persons with mobility restrictions and other functional limitations often face problems in public environments, leading to restrictions in activity and participation. To investigate general accessibility and perceived problems of accessibility to the public environment in a town centre, as well as visiting preferences to public facilities, among teenagers with functional limitations.
An interview questionnaire specific to a south Swedish town was constructed and used with 33 Swedish teenagers with functional limitations.
To a varying degree, all 33 teenagers commented on accessibility problems, e.g. concerning uneven surface material outdoors, steps at entrances, heavy doors and restricted space indoors. The results also indicated that teenagers with functional limitations to a high extent want to visit the same environments as other teenagers, but that it is often impossible owing to accessibility problems. Furthermore, because of accessibility problems, many of the teenagers were dependent on personal assistance.
Inaccessibility results in dependence, which might affect personal development negatively, and much effort are required in order to ensure activity and societal participation. Efficient priorities in public environment accessibility matters and discussions with the actors involved require valid and reliable data on local accessibility problems.
PubMed ID
12017465 View in PubMed
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Adopting and implementing nutrition guidelines in recreational facilities: public and private sector roles. A multiple case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124044
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:376
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Dana Lee Olstad
Kim D Raine
Linda J McCargar
Author Affiliation
Alberta Institute for Human Nutrition, 4-126 Li Ka Shing Centre, 8606 112 St, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:376
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Food - standards
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Nutrition Policy
Obesity - prevention & control
Private Sector - organization & administration
Public Facilities
Qualitative Research
Recreation
Abstract
Recreational facilities are an important community resource for health promotion because they provide access to affordable physical activities. However, despite their health mandate, many have unhealthy food environments that may paradoxically increase the risk of childhood obesity. The Alberta Nutrition Guidelines for Children and Youth (ANGCY) are government-initiated, voluntary guidelines intended to facilitate children's access to healthy food and beverage choices in schools, childcare and recreational facilities, however few recreational facilities are using them.
We used mixed methods within an exploratory multiple case study to examine factors that influenced adoption and implementation of the ANGCY and the nature of the food environment within three cases: an adopter, a semi-adopter and a non-adopter of the ANGCY. Diffusion of Innovations theory provided the theoretical platform for the study. Qualitative data were generated through interviews, observations, and document reviews, and were analysed using directed content analysis. Set theoretic logic was used to identify factors that differentiated adopters from the non-adopter. Quantitative sales data were also collected, and the quality of the food environment was scored using four complementary tools.
The keys to adoption and implementation of nutrition guidelines in recreational facilities related to the managers' nutrition-related knowledge, beliefs and perceptions, as these shaped his decisions and actions. The manager, however, could not accomplish adoption and implementation alone. Intersectoral linkages with schools and formal, health promoting partnerships with industry were also important for adoption and implementation to occur. The food environment in facilities that had adopted the ANGCY did not appear to be superior to the food environment in facilities that had not adopted the ANGCY.
ANGCY uptake may continue to falter under the current voluntary approach, as the environmental supports for voluntary action are poor. Where ANGCY uptake does occur, changes to the food environment may be relatively minor. Stronger government measures may be needed to require recreational facilities to improve their food environments and to limit availability of unhealthy foods.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22632384 View in PubMed
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Airborne exposure and biological monitoring of bar and restaurant workers before and after the introduction of a smoking ban.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82661
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Mar;8(3):362-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Ellingsen Dag G
Fladseth Geir
Daae Hanne L
Gjølstad Merete
Kjaerheim Kristina
Skogstad Marit
Olsen Raymond
Thorud Syvert
Molander Paal
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, P.O. Box 8149 Dep, N-0033, Oslo, Norway. dag.ellingsen@stami.no
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Mar;8(3):362-8
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Cotinine - urine
Dust - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nicotine - analysis
Norway
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Public Facilities - legislation & jurisprudence
Restaurants
Smoking - legislation & jurisprudence
Time Factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - analysis - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The aims were to assess the impact of a total smoking ban on the level of airborne contaminants and the urinary cotinine levels in the employees in bars and restaurants. In a follow up design, 13 bars and restaurants were visited before and after the implementation of a smoking ban. Ninety-three employees in the establishments were initially included into the study. The arithmetic mean concentration of nicotine and total dust declined from 28.3 microg m(-3) (range, 0.4-88.0) and 262 microg m(-3) (range, 52-662), respectively, to 0.6 microg m(-3) (range, not detected-3.7) and 77 microg m(-3) (range, not detected-261) after the smoking ban. The Pearson correlation coefficient between airborne nicotine and total dust was 0.86 (p
PubMed ID
16528420 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 associated with a children's water spray park and identified by two rounds of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174311
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2005 Jun 15;31(12):133-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2005

The association between high recreational physical activity and physical activity as a part of daily living in adolescents and availability of local indoor sports facilities and sports clubs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120075
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Nov;40(7):614-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Birgit Niclasen
Max Petzold
Christina W Schnohr
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden. niclasen@greennet.gl
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Nov;40(7):614-20
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Greenland
Humans
Life Style
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Public Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Recreation
Sports
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine how vigorous physical activity (recreational physical activity) (VPA) and moderate to vigorous physical activity as a part of daily life (MVPA) is associated with structural characteristics (availability of sports facilities and sports clubs with child members) in Greenlandic adolescents.
Data from the 2006 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey including 2,430 children aged 11-17 years was used. Logistic regression models were developed with dichotomous measures on VPA and MVPA as outcomes, number of indoor sports facilities and of sports clubs with child members as independent variables, and adjusted for age, gender, family affluence (FAS), and type of habitation (capital, town or village).
High VPA increased with access to indoor facilities, while high MVPA was less likely (odds ratio (OR) 0.54 (0.42-0.70)) if indoor sports facilities were present, both unadjusted and adjusted. Access to a local sports club increased OR for high VPA both unadjusted and adjusted to about 2.3 for five or more clubs, while access to sports clubs was not associated with unadjusted MVPA, negatively associated if adjusted for age, gender and FAS but positively associated if also adjusted for indoor sports facilities.
Access to indoor sports facilities itself had a positive association with high VPA, but was persistently negatively associated with high MVPA. Presence of sports clubs with child members was positively associated with high VPA while the association with high MVPA was more complex. The findings have implications for public health planning.
PubMed ID
23042458 View in PubMed
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Association of park size, distance, and features with physical activity in neighborhood parks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156705
Source
Am J Public Health. 2008 Aug;98(8):1451-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Andrew T Kaczynski
Luke R Potwarka
Brian E Saelens
Author Affiliation
Department of Kinesiology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. atkaczyn@k-state.edu
Source
Am J Public Health. 2008 Aug;98(8):1451-6
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Databases, Factual
Environment Design
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Public Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Recreation
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Sports
Abstract
We studied whether park size, number of features in the park, and distance to a park from participants' homes were related to a park being used for physical activity.
We collected observational data on 28 specific features from 33 parks. Adult residents in surrounding areas (n=380) completed 7-day physical activity logs that included the location of their activities. We used logistic regression to examine the relative importance of park size, features, and distance to participants' homes in predicting whether a park was used for physical activity, with control for perceived neighborhood safety and aesthetics.
Parks with more features were more likely to be used for physical activity; size and distance were not significant predictors. Park facilities were more important than were park amenities. Of the park facilities, trails had the strongest relationship with park use for physical activity.
Specific park features may have significant implications for park-based physical activity. Future research should explore these factors in diverse neighborhoods and diverse parks among both younger and older populations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18556600 View in PubMed
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Bad nights or bad bars? Multi-level analysis of environmental predictors of aggression in late-night large-capacity bars and clubs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167095
Source
Addiction. 2006 Nov;101(11):1569-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Kathryn Graham
Sharon Bernards
D Wayne Osgood
Samantha Wells
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, Canada. kgraham@uwo.ca
Source
Addiction. 2006 Nov;101(11):1569-80
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aggression
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - psychology
Analysis of Variance
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Public Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Research Design
Social Behavior
Social Environment
Abstract
To clarify environmental predictors of bar-room aggression by differentiating relationships due to nightly variations versus across bar variations, frequency versus severity of aggression and patron versus staff aggression.
Male-female pairs of researcher-observers conducted 1334 observations in 118 large capacity (> 300) bars and clubs in Toronto, Canada.
Observers independently rated aspects of the environment (e.g. crowding) at every visit and wrote detailed narratives of each incident of aggression that occurred. Measures of severity of aggression for the visit were calculated by aggregating ratings for each person in aggressive incidents.
Although bivariate analyses confirmed the significance of most environmental predictors of aggression identified in previous research, multivariate analyses identified the following key visit-level predictors (controlling for bar-level relationships): rowdiness/permissive environment and people hanging around after closing predicted both frequency and severity of aggression; sexual activity, contact and competition and people with two or more drinks at closing predicted frequency but not severity of aggression; lack of staff monitoring predicted more severe patron aggression, while having more and better coordinated staff predicted more severe staff aggression. Intoxication of patrons was significantly associated with more frequent and severe patron aggression at the bar level (but not at the visit level) in the multivariate analyses and negatively associated with severity of staff aggression at the visit level.
The results demonstrate clearly the importance of the immediate environment (not just the type of bar or characteristics of usual patrons) and the importance of specific environmental factors, including staff behaviour, in predicting both frequency and severity of aggression.
PubMed ID
17034436 View in PubMed
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Bingo halls and smoking: perspectives of First Nations women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150673
Source
Health Place. 2009 Dec;15(4):1014-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Joan L Bottorff
Joanne Carey
Roberta Mowatt
Colleen Varcoe
Joy L Johnson
Peter Hutchinson
Debbie Sullivan
Wanda Williams
Dennis Wardman
Author Affiliation
Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention, University of British Columbia Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, BC, Canada V1V 1V7. joan.bottorff@ubc.ca
Source
Health Place. 2009 Dec;15(4):1014-21
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Leisure Activities - economics - psychology
Public Facilities
Rural Health
Sex Factors
Smoking - ethnology - psychology
Social Environment
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine bingo halls as a frequent site for exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke for First Nations women in rural communities. Thematic analysis of interviews with key informants, group discussions with young women, and observations in the study communities revealed that smoky bingo halls provided an important refuge from everyday experiences of stress and trauma, as well as increased women's risk for addiction, marginalization, and criticism. The findings illustrate how the bingo economy in isolated, rural First Nation communities influences tobacco use and second-hand smoke exposure, and how efforts to establish smoke-free bingos can be supported.
PubMed ID
19482540 View in PubMed
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75 records – page 1 of 8.