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178 records – page 1 of 18.

The 2-year costs and effects of a public health nursing case management intervention on mood-disordered single parents on social assistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191135
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2002 Feb;8(1):45-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Maureen Markle-Reid
Gina Browne
Jacqueline Roberts
Amiram Gafni
Carolyn Byrne
Author Affiliation
System-Linked Research Unit on Health and Social Service Utilization, School of Nursing, McMaster University, Room 3N46, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5, Canada. mreid@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2002 Feb;8(1):45-59
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Case Management - economics
Child
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Depressive Disorder - economics - nursing - rehabilitation
Employment
Female
Health Care Costs
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Ontario
Public Assistance
Public Health Nursing - economics
Single Parent - psychology
Social Adjustment
Abstract
This randomized controlled trial was designed to evaluate the 2-year costs and effects of a proactive, public health nursing case management approach compared with a self-directed approach for 129 single parents (98% were mothers) on social assistance in a Canadian setting. A total of 43% of these parents had a major depressive disorder and 38% had two or three other health conditions at baseline.
Study participants were recruited over a 12 month period and randomized into two groups: one receiving proactive public health nursing and one which did not.
At 2 years, 69 single parents with 123 children receiving proactive public health nursing (compared with 60 parents with 91 children who did not receive public health nursing services) showed a slightly greater reduction in dysthymia and slightly higher social adjustment. There was no difference between the public health and control groups in total per parent annual cost of health and support services. However, costs were averted due to a 12% difference in non-use of social assistance in the previous 12 months for parents in the public health nursing group. This translates into an annual cost saving of 240,000 dollars (Canadian) of costs averted within 1 year for every 100 parents.
In the context of a system of national health and social insurance, this study supports the fact that it is no more costly to proactively service this population of parents on social assistance.
PubMed ID
11882101 View in PubMed
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[Advice about the types of residence for elderly sick patients. A study of the forms of residence preferred by 470 pensioners].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236993
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1986 May 19;148(21):1297-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-19-1986

Alaska elementary school exchange program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43751
Source
Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Oulu, Finland, June 21-24, 1971. Acta Sociomed Scand Suppl. 1972;Suppl 6:35-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1972
  1 document  
Author
Doak, J.
Author Affiliation
Developmental Disabilities, Anchorage, Alaska
Source
Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Oulu, Finland, June 21-24, 1971. Acta Sociomed Scand Suppl. 1972;Suppl 6:35-7
Date
1972
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Child
Culture
Education
Humans
Inuits
Motivation
Public Assistance
Schools
PubMed ID
4536505 View in PubMed
Documents
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Analysis of caries status development in relation to socio-economic variables using a case-based system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193928
Source
Swed Dent J. 2001;25(2):81-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
Y. Swedberg
J G Norén
Author Affiliation
Department of Pedodontics, Faculty of Odontology, and Public Dental Service, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 2001;25(2):81-8
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Artificial Intelligence
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration
Employment
Expert Systems
Family
Health status
Humans
Incidence
Income
Middle Aged
Public Assistance
Social Class
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Suburban Health
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Urban health
Abstract
The aim of this study was to detect, using case-based reasoning (CBR) induction methods in time series analysis, how measurable socio-economical adjustments were related to the caries status development. The study concerned the year classes leaving the organised dental care for the time period 1987-95, and had received dental care at the Public Dental Service of Göteborg. The results, as presented by a caries incidence index, indicated that at least one socioeconomical factor, individuals seeking employment, was of importance for the caries status development, a factor with an increase of considerable proportions since 1990. The findings indicated that the other socio-economic variables used did not have the same importance for the caries status development. One feasible explanation is that these factors reflect more upon the social family situation than the economical. If the caries status reflects the social situation of the individual more than the economical, this argument will elucidate the reasoning. Using CBR for the analysis of relationships between oral disease and parameters possibly influencing health development has proven to be a valuable tool and complement to more traditional statistical methods. The analysis can make relationships explicit through the hierarchic knowledge trees and also show redundant information, attributes not appearing in the trees.
PubMed ID
11471971 View in PubMed
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Aspects of living conditions among groups of disabled children and their families in Norway: family situation, mothers' health, financial assistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14679
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1983;17(23):1837-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
K. Storhaug
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1983;17(23):1837-45
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Disabled Persons
Family
Family Health
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway
Public Assistance
Social Conditions
Social Welfare
Abstract
A survey of 875 disabled children in Norway aged 0-19, representing ten different disabling conditions, was carried out between January 1976 and December 1978. Parents of the disabled children were interviewed, medical records studied and the children examined. Mother's age, level of education, presence of disabled siblings, spouse's education and profession as well as emergency situations related to the disabled child's condition appeared to be factors influencing the mother's health and therefore inevitably the family's ability to cope with the situation. Social insurance seemed to have been granted in a rather haphazard way; only families of children suffering from hemophilia, mental retardation, spina bifida and cerebral palsy seemed to have received fairly adequate social insurance benefits. Families of children suffering from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, congenital heart disease and epilepsy had received less social insurance assistance than those in the other groups. One-parent families had received more social insurance than others. Families with children who were totally dependent on their parents, who had several diagnoses or had spent much time in hospital, had also been granted more social insurance. Welfare benefits distributed by local authorities had mainly been given to families who were also receiving social insurance benefits and to families of children with brain damage. Almost half of all families expressed needs for welfare benefits which had not been met. Thus, there seemed to be an underconsumption of both social insurance and welfare benefits, particularly among some diagnostic groups.
PubMed ID
6229033 View in PubMed
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178 records – page 1 of 18.