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5HTR2A gene polymorphism and personality traits in patients with major psychoses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190821
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2002 Mar;17(1):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
V E Golimbet
M V Alfimova
K K Manandyan
N G Mitushina
L I Abramova
V G Kaleda
I V Oleichik
YuB Yurov
V I Trubnikov
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Preventive Genetics, Research Mental Health Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Zagorodnoe sh. 2/2, Moscow, Russia 113152. golimbet@mail.ru
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2002 Mar;17(1):24-8
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Female
Humans
Male
Moscow
Personality - genetics
Personality Inventory
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - genetics
Receptors, Serotonin - genetics
Abstract
Serotonin receptor (5HTR2A) gene polymorphism has been reported to be associated with clinical phenotypes in schizophrenia. The current study attempted to investigate a relationship between 5HTR2A 102T/C polymorphism and personality traits as well as clinical symptoms in patients with ICD-10 diagnoses of schizophrenia and affective disorders. 5HTR2A genotyping, clinical and psychological assessment were administered to 375 patients, 104 first-degree healthy relatives of the patients and 157 controls. In the patients an association was observed between the 2/2 5HTR2A genotype and scores on the Hypochondriasis scale (MMPI) (ANOVA, F = 4.56; P = 0.011) and trait anxiety (F = 4.21; P = 0.002). A significant difference between 1/1 and 2/2 genotypes has been also found for Neuroticism scores (EPI) (t = 2.18; P = 0.0031). No significant differences by 5HTR2A genotype were observed in either the control or first-degree relatives group for all scales studied. Positive, negative and psychopathological symptoms emerged higher in the 2/2 genotype patients compared to other genotype carriers. Therefore, the 2/2 genotype may contribute to produce the phenotype, with specific clinical and pathological features in common, regardless of nosologic heterogeneity of psychoses.
PubMed ID
11918989 View in PubMed
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An Icelandic family study of schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254222
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 1973 Nov;123(576):549-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1973

Association between family history of psychiatric disorders and long-term outcome in schizophrenia - The Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287669
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2017 Mar;249:16-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Juha Käkelä
Riikka Marttila
Emmi Keskinen
Juha Veijola
Matti Isohanni
Heli Koivumaa-Honkanen
Marianne Haapea
Erika Jääskeläinen
Jouko Miettunen
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2017 Mar;249:16-22
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Family - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - genetics - psychology
Middle Aged
Psychotic Disorders - genetics - psychology
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - genetics
Schizophrenic Psychology
Abstract
Family history of psychiatric disorders has been associated with impaired outcome in schizophrenia, but very few studies have investigated its long-term social and occupational outcome. We investigated the association of family history of psychiatric disorders, especially psychosis, with long-term social, occupational, clinical and global outcome in schizophrenia. The study sample comprises of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966. Cohort members with psychosis were detected by Finnish national registers. Altogether 69 individuals with schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis participated, mean age 43, after on average 17 years since onset of illness. The information regarding family history of psychiatric disorders were gathered from registers and interviews. A Strauss-Carpenter Outcome Scale, PANSS and SOFAS were conducted to assess the outcome. Results showed that the family history of any psychiatric disorder was associated with more severe positive and emotional symptoms in PANSS. The family history of psychosis was not associated with outcomes. These findings suggest that family history of psychiatric disorders has a small association with outcome in schizophrenia. Despite family history of psychosis being a strong risk factor for schizophrenia, after years of illness it does not seem to affect outcome.
PubMed ID
28063393 View in PubMed
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Association of variants in DISC1 with psychosis-related traits in a large population cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152812
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2009 Feb;66(2):134-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Liisa Tomppo
William Hennah
Jouko Miettunen
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Juha Veijola
Samuli Ripatti
Päivi Lahermo
Dirk Lichtermann
Leena Peltonen
Jesper Ekelund
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. Jesper.Ekelund@ktl.fi
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2009 Feb;66(2):134-41
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - genetics
Alleles
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Heterozygote Detection
Humans
Male
Nerve Tissue Proteins - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - genetics - psychology
Schizophrenia - genetics
Schizophrenic Psychology
Social Behavior
Abstract
There is an abundance of data from human genetic studies and animal models that implies a role for the disrupted in schizophrenia 1 gene (DISC1) in the etiology of schizophrenia and other major mental illnesses.
To study the effect of previously identified risk alleles of DISC1 on quantitative intermediate phenotypes for psychosis in an unselected population.
We examined 41 single-nucleotide polymorphisms within DISC1 and performed tests of association with 4 quantitative phenotypes.
Academic research.
Individuals from an unselected birth cohort in Finland. Originally, everyone born in the catchment area in 1966 (N = 12 058) was included in the study. Of these, 4651 (38.6%) attended the 31-year follow-up and could be included in the study.
Scores on 4 psychometric instruments selected to function as proxies for positive and negative aspects of psychotic disorders, including the Perceptual Aberration Scale, Revised Social Anhedonia Scale, Revised Physical Anhedonia Scale, and Schizoidia Scale by Golden and Meehl.
Carriers of the minor allele of marker rs821577 had significantly higher scores on social anhedonia (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
19188535 View in PubMed
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A comparison of the genetic and clinical risk factors for arterial hypertension between indigenous and non-indigenous people of the Shoria Mountain Region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294446
Source
Clin Exp Hypertens. 2018; 40(4):324-331
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Tatyana Mulerova
Michael Ogarkov
Evgenya Uchasova
Michael Voevoda
Olga Barbarash
Author Affiliation
a Federal State Budgetary of Scientific Institution , Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases , Kemerovo , Russia.
Source
Clin Exp Hypertens. 2018; 40(4):324-331
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arterial Pressure - genetics
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Body Weight
Ethnic Groups - genetics
Female
Genotype
Glucose Intolerance - ethnology
Homocystinuria - genetics
Humans
Hypertension - ethnology - genetics
Male
Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2) - deficiency - genetics
Middle Aged
Muscle Spasticity - genetics
Obesity, Abdominal - ethnology
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prevalence
Psychotic Disorders - genetics
Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2 - genetics
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study investigated the non-genetic and genetic risk factors for arterial hypertension (AH) in two ethnic groups living in the Mountain Shoria region: Shors and non-indigenous people.
Clinical and epidemiological study of compactly living population in the remote areas of the Mountain Shoria (Orton, Ust-Kabyrza, Sheregesh settlements, Kemerovo region). 1178 residents of these settlements were surveyed with the help of continuous sampling method; the sample consisted of adults (18 years and older).
The prevalence of AH was lower in Shors (39.9% vs. 46.1%), mainly due to differences between men from the different groups: 33.2% vs. 45.8%. The percentage of people with AH, overweight, and obesity (including transabdominal obesity) in the different age groups did not differ between ethnicities. We identified statistically significant differences in the prevalence of hypertension according the two ethic groups according to age, body weight, and abdominal obesity. I/D ACE and ADRA2B polymorphisms were associated with AH. In DD ACE and DD ADRA2B carriers, there were fewer hypertensive patients in Shors than in non-indigenous people: 40.6% vs. 58.6% and 38.3% vs. 64.0%, respectively. In DD ACE carriers, more Shors had AH (60.0% vs. 37.1%).
Among Shors, the following factors increased AH risk: female sex, age, hypercholesterolemia, hyperbetacholesterinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, obesity (including transabdominal obesity), glucose intolerance, and the DD ACE, CT MTHFR, and AA ADRB1 genotypes; among the non-indigenous population, the main factors were age, hypercholesterolemia, hyperbetacholesterinemia, hypoalfacholesterinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, obesity (including transabdominal obesity), and ID ACE genotype.
PubMed ID
29027816 View in PubMed
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Default mode network in young people with familial risk for psychosis--the Oulu Brain and Mind study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118008
Source
Schizophr Res. 2013 Feb;143(2-3):239-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Tuomas Jukuri
Vesa Kiviniemi
Juha Nikkinen
Jouko Miettunen
Pirjo Mäki
Erika Jääskeläinen
Sari Mukkala
Jenni Koivukangas
Tanja Nordström
Anja Taanila
Irma Moilanen
Markus Heinimaa
Jennifer H Barnett
Peter B Jones
Graham K Murray
Juha Veijola
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland. tuomas.jukuri@ppshp.fi
Source
Schizophr Res. 2013 Feb;143(2-3):239-45
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain - physiopathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Gyrus Cinguli - physiopathology
Health Surveys
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - instrumentation - methods
Male
Nerve Net - physiopathology
Psychotic Disorders - genetics - physiopathology
Registries
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
The default mode network (DMN) is active in the brain at rest and de-activated during cognitive tasks. Abnormal function in the DMN has been reported in people with schizophrenia but it is not known whether this applies also to people with a familial risk for psychosis (FR). We compared the activity of the DMN between FR participants and controls.
We conducted a resting state functional MRI (R-fMRI) in 72 young adults without psychosis and with a history of psychosis in one or both parents (FR group) and 72 age matched controls without parental psychosis, and without current psychosis or a current prodromal syndrome. Both groups were drawn from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (Oulu Brain and Mind study). Parental psychosis was established using the Finnish hospital discharge register. We pre-processed R-fMRI data using independent component analysis followed by a dual regression approach to assess differences between the groups. The FR vs. Control group differences were assessed using non-parametric permutation tests utilizing threshold-free cluster enhancement and correcting for multiple comparisons (p
PubMed ID
23245776 View in PubMed
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The Department of Psychiatry Kommunehospitalet Copenhagen 1875-1975.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42842
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1975;261:1-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975

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