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18 records – page 1 of 2.

Early detection of first-episode psychosis: the effect on 1-year outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81653
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2006 Oct;32(4):758-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Larsen Tor K
Melle Ingrid
Auestad Bjørn
Friis Svein
Haahr Ulrik
Johannessen Jan Olav
Opjordsmoen Stein
Rund Bjørn Rishovd
Simonsen Erik
Vaglum Per
McGlashan Thomas
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Clinic, University of Stavanger, Armauer Hansensv. 20, PB 8100, N-4068 Stavanger, Norway. tklarsen@online.no
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2006 Oct;32(4):758-64
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Algorithms
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Early Diagnosis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - supply & distribution
Middle Aged
Norway
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Psychotherapy
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - therapy
Schizophrenic Psychology
Abstract
Early intervention is assumed to improve outcome in first-episode psychosis, but this has not been proven. OBJECTIVE: To study whether 1-year outcome will be better in a health care sector with early detection (ED) of psychosis compared with sectors with no early detection (no-ED). DESIGN: A quasi-experimental study with ED in 2 experimental sectors and no-ED in 2 control sectors. ED was achieved through low-threshold ED teams and information campaigns about psychosis for the public, schools, and primary health care providers. The ED and no-ED health care areas offered an equivalent assessment and treatment program during the first year. Two hundred and eighty-one patients were included; 88% were reassessed after 1 year. RESULTS: The ED-area patients (N = 141) had a median duration of untreated psychosis of 5 weeks at baseline compared with 16 weeks for patients in the no-ED area (N = 140). Positive and general symptoms, global assessment of functioning, quality of life, time to remission, and course of psychosis at 1 year after the start of treatment were not different between ED and no-ED groups. Outcome was significantly better for the ED area for negative symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The ED, no-ED differences at baseline become attenuated by 1 year but not the difference in negative symptoms, suggesting secondary prevention in this domain of psychopathology. However, this possibility requires further testing by follow-up and replication.
PubMed ID
16809640 View in PubMed
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Early psychosis identification and intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186093
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2003 Apr;54(4):573
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Karen Tee
Tom S Ehmann
G William MacEwan
Author Affiliation
Early Psychosis Intervention Program, 15521 Russell Avenue, White Rock, British Columbia, Canada V4B 2R4. karen.tee@southfraserhealth.ca
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2003 Apr;54(4):573
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
British Columbia
Community Mental Health Services - standards
Humans
Inservice training
Patient care team
Patient Education as Topic
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Program Development
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Time Factors
PubMed ID
12663850 View in PubMed
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Factors of importance to involuntary admission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131108
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;66(3):178-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Lars Henrik Myklebust
Knut Sørgaard
Ketil Røtvold
Rolf Wynn
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Research Centre of Northern Norway, Nordland Hospital Trust, N-8092 Bodø, Norway.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;66(3):178-82
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Coercion
Commitment of Mentally Ill - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Most countries allow for the use of involuntary admission of patients. While some countries have stable or declining rates of involuntary admission, this type of coercion is now on the increase in several European countries.
To increase understanding of the antecedents of involuntary admission.
The importance of various predictors of involuntary admission were analysed in univariate analyses and in a logistic regression model, involving approximately 2000 admissions to a Norwegian hospital.
Involuntary admission was positively associated with the diagnostic category of psychosis and negatively associated with the category of anxiety. Emergency referrals were also more likely to be coerced.
Diagnostic category seems to be a central factor with respect to involuntary admission. Patients that were admitted in an emergency were also more likely to be coerced.
Certain groups of patients are more likely to be admitted involuntarily. Increasing attention to these groups could possibly also contribute to the reduction of coercion.
PubMed ID
21936731 View in PubMed
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First-episode schizophrenia: I. Early course parameters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52772
Source
Schizophr Bull. 1996;22(2):241-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
T K Larsen
T H McGlashan
L C Moe
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Hospital of Rogaland, Stavanger, Norway.
Source
Schizophr Bull. 1996;22(2):241-56
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Disease Progression
Episode of Care
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Prognosis
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Research - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Terminology
Time Factors
Abstract
Concepts and definitions pertaining to the early course of schizophrenia are reviewed, along with recent illustrative studies of first-episode schizophrenia. Early course parameters of a Norwegian first-episode sample are presented. This sample (n = 43) demonstrated strong gender differences, with male patients having significantly higher frequency of single marital status, lower educational status, schizophrenia, early age at onset, and lower Global Assessment of Functioning scores the last year before hospitalization. The duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) was long (mean = 114 weeks), as in other studies. Longer DUP was associated with poorer work, social, and global functioning in the year before admission, with more insidious onset of psychosis, and with more negative symptoms at first clinical presentation. Longer DUP was not associated with the age at onset of psychosis. These findings were mostly gender independent. The data help to frame questions about why patients can be psychotic for so long before getting help. Finally, suggestions are offered for the definition and measurement of early course parameters for schizophrenia.
PubMed ID
8782284 View in PubMed
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[Handling out epicrisis without the consent of the psychotic patient].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210550
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Nov 20;116(28):3393
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-1996
Author
C F Haaland
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Nov 20;116(28):3393
Date
Nov-20-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Confidentiality
Humans
Informed consent
Malpractice
Medical Records
Norway
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
PubMed ID
9012004 View in PubMed
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High levels of anomalous self-experience are associated with longer duration of untreated psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287124
Source
Early Interv Psychiatry. 2017 Apr;11(2):133-138
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Elisabeth Haug
Merete Øie
Ole A Andreassen
Unni Bratlien
Barnaby Nelson
Ingrid Melle
Paul Møller
Source
Early Interv Psychiatry. 2017 Apr;11(2):133-138
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Delusions - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Early Diagnosis
Early Medical Intervention
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - therapy
Schizophrenic Psychology
Self Concept
Statistics as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the relationship between anomalous self-experiences and duration of untreated psychosis in a sample of patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders.
Anomalous self-experiences were assessed by means of the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience manual in 55 patients referred to their first adequate treatment for schizophrenia. Diagnoses, symptom severity, functioning and childhood trauma were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Premorbid Adjustment Scale, Social Functioning Scale and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Substance misuse was measured with the Drug Use Disorder Identification Test, and alcohol use was measured with the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test. Duration of untreated psychosis was measured in accordance with a standardized procedure.
High levels of anomalous self-experiences are significantly associated with longer duration of untreated psychosis, an association which held after correcting for other variables associated with long duration of untreated psychosis.
The field of early detection in psychosis is in need of additional clinical perspectives to make further progress. Improved understanding and assessment of anomalous self-experiences may help clinicians to detect these important phenomena and provide earlier help, and thus reduce treatment delay.
PubMed ID
25589153 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Apr 21;170(17):1458-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-21-2008
Author
Jeanett Bauer
Anders Fink-Jensen
Author Affiliation
Rigshospitalet, Psykiatrisk Center, København Ø. jeanett.bauer@mail.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Apr 21;170(17):1458-60
Date
Apr-21-2008
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Denmark
Humans
Patient Admission - legislation & jurisprudence
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
PubMed ID
18462625 View in PubMed
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Looking for "a good doctor": a cultural formulation of the treatment of a First Nations woman using western and First Nations method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6425
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1998;8(2):79-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
G V Mohatt
S. Varvin
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Department of Psychology 99775-6480, USA.
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1998;8(2):79-96
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Culture
Female
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Mental Healing
Physician-Patient Relations
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Abstract
The following paper utilizes the DSM-IV suggested clinical and cultural formulation to present an example of how First Nations and western treatment methods can work together to treat a First Nation's woman with a serious mental disorder. The formulation provides reflections on cultural elements in the diagnosis and what distinct and common elements are present in the First Nations and western explanatory models for etiology and treatment.
PubMed ID
9842067 View in PubMed
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Moving beyond policy rhetoric: building a moral community for early psychosis intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149064
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Sep;16(7):621-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
J Hamilton Wilson
Author Affiliation
McMaster Mohawk Conestoga, BScN Program, Conestoga College Advanced Technology and Learning, 299 Doon Valley Drive, Kitchener, ON N2G 4M4, Canada. Jhamiltonwilson@conestogac.on.ca
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Sep;16(7):621-8
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Early Diagnosis
Ethical Relativism
Evidence-Based Practice
Female
Health Planning Guidelines
Health Policy
Humans
Mental Health Services - ethics - organization & administration
Morals
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations - ethics
Ontario
Philosophy, Nursing
Principle-Based Ethics
Prognosis
Psychiatric Nursing - ethics - organization & administration
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Abstract
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. Margaret Mead It has been my privilege to work in partnership with hundreds of patients experiencing emergent psychosis, in Hamilton, Ontario during the course of my lengthy nursing career. Indeed, the knowledge I have gleaned from both the courageous individuals who have experienced serious mental illness and their resilient families has been monumental. When I first began my career, I was utterly naïve and most certainly held the misguided assumption that to be a mental health nurse required an adherence to a strict set of nursing principles and that the nurse-patient relationship was approached from an objective and 'safe' distance. Reflecting on this now, many years later I understand that the therapeutic relationship between nurses and those they serve is foundational to the delivery of safe and ethical mental health care. Although increasingly clinical practice guidelines and evidence-based interventions serve to inform nursing practice, in my mind it is the embodied experience of relationship that is the real instrument of healing and transformation. Recognizing that early intervention provides an unprecedented opportunity to begin anew with young patients who have no prior experiences with the mental health care system, the purpose of this paper is to serve as a vehicle for discussion and potentially inspire a group of thoughtful, committed nurses to change the world of mental health services by creating a respectful moral community. I propose that relational ethics form the values and ideals of a fully humane early psychosis intervention community in Ontario. Using the foundational tenets of the nurse-patient relationship illustrated through the use of a clinical narrative, I will suggest ways that nurses can proactively take up the early intervention challenge and contribute to an overall culture of optimism and hope. Intervening early is simply not enough. We must first commit to developing comprehensive recovery-oriented treatments in a coordinated and thoughtful way.
PubMed ID
19689555 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.