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[Abuse of psychoactive drugs and social adjustment of psychotic patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203535
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1998 Dec;43(10):1036-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
A. Lépine
G. Côté
Author Affiliation
Département de psychologie, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Québec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1998 Dec;43(10):1036-9
Date
Dec-1998
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Humans
Male
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Prisoners - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Psychotropic Drugs
Quebec
Social Adjustment
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Is the abuse of psychoactive drugs in psychotic patients linked to social adjustment?
Fifty-five psychotic men from a detention centre or a psychiatric hospital were assessed with the Social Adjustment Scale (SAS-II) and a French version of the Phillips Rating Scale of Premorbid Adjustment in Schizophrenia.
In psychotic patients, the abuse of psychoactive drugs is linked to some indicators of social adjustment and premorbid sexual adaptation.
Differences were found in some aspects of social functioning, but it is difficult to establish an overall assessment of social adjustment.
PubMed ID
9868570 View in PubMed
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Acute and transient psychotic disorder: comorbidity with personality disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210442
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Dec;94(6):460-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
P. Jørgensen
B. Bennedsen
J. Christensen
A. Hyllested
Author Affiliation
Department A, Psychiatric Hospital, Risskov, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Dec;94(6):460-4
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Social Adjustment
Abstract
A study sample of 51 patients with acute and transient psychotic disorder (ATPD) (ICD-10) is presented. The findings suggest that, in hospital settings, ATPD is a non-frequent condition with onset in early adult life and most often associated with female sex, good premorbid social functioning and no or minor/moderate psychosocial stressors. The DSM-IV criteria distribute the patients into three diagnostic categories: schizophreniform disorder (41%), brief psychotic disorder (33%) and psychotic disorder not otherwise classified (25%). A high prevalence (63%) of personality disorders (PD) is revealed after recovery from the psychotic episode. The ATPD is not related to any specific PD, and in a substantial minority (37%) of cases no PD is found. The unspecified category is by far the most frequent PD in patients with ATPD. The sample will be followed up and reassessed.
PubMed ID
9021000 View in PubMed
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Adolescent psychosis risk symptoms predicting persistent psychiatric service use: A 7-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298906
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2019 01; 55:102-108
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2019
Author
Maija Lindgren
Minna Jonninen
Markus Jokela
Sebastian Therman
Author Affiliation
Mental Health Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: maija.lindgren@thl.fi.
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2019 01; 55:102-108
Date
01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Prodromal Symptoms
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychopathology
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We investigated whether psychosis risk symptoms predicted psychiatric service use using seven-year register follow-up data.
Our sample included 715 adolescents aged 15-18, referred to psychiatric care for the first time. Psychosis risk symptoms were assessed with the Prodromal Questionnaire (PQ) at the beginning of the treatment. We assessed the power of the overall PQ as well as its positive, negative, general, and disorganized psychosis risk symptom factors in predicting prolonged service use. Baseline psychiatric diagnoses (grouped into 7 categories) were controlled for. Based on both inpatient and outpatient psychiatric treatment after baseline, adolescents were divided into three groups of brief, intermittent, and persistent service use.
Stronger symptoms on any PQ factor as well as the presence of a mood disorder predicted prolonged service use. All of the PQ factors remained significant predictors when adjusted for baseline mood disorder and multimorbidity.
In a prospective follow-up of a large sample using comprehensive mental health records, our findings indicate that assessing psychosis risk symptoms in clinical adolescent settings at the beginning of treatment could predict long-term need for care beyond diagnostic information. Our findings replicate the previous findings that positive psychosis risk symptoms are unspecific markers of severity of psychopathology. Also psychosis risk symptoms of the negative, disorganization, and general clusters are approximately as strongly associated with prolonged psychiatric service use in the upcoming years.
PubMed ID
30447416 View in PubMed
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Adverse pregnancy outcomes in mothers with affective psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78089
Source
Bipolar Disord. 2007 May;9(3):305-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
MacCabe James H
Martinsson Lennart
Lichtenstein Paul
Nilsson Emma
Cnattingius Sven
Murray Robin M
Hultman Christina M
Author Affiliation
Section of General Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK. j.maccabe@iop.kcl.ac.uk
Source
Bipolar Disord. 2007 May;9(3):305-9
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Case-Control Studies
Demography
Female
Fetal Diseases - epidemiology
Fetal Growth Retardation - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy outcome
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Affective psychosis has its peak incidence during the childbearing years, but little is known about the effects of the illness on pregnancy. We investigated risks of preterm delivery (PTD), low birthweight (LBW), births of infants small for their gestational age (SGA), stillbirth and infant death in births to mothers with affective psychosis using a nested case-control design within a cohort of 1,558,071 singleton births in Sweden during 1983-1997. METHODS: Using prospectively collected data from population registers, we compared the pregnancy outcomes of 5,618 births to women with affective psychosis with the outcomes of 46,246 births to unaffected mothers. RESULTS: Mothers with affective psychosis had elevated risk for giving birth to preterm, small or growth-retarded babies. The risk for stillbirth and infant death during the first year of life was not significantly higher. The risks were greatest in mothers receiving hospital treatment for affective disorder during pregnancy: (i) preterm delivery: odds ratio (OR) = 2.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.71-4.17; (ii) SGA: OR = 2.36; 95% CI = 1.34-4.16; (iii) low birthweight: OR = 2.22; 95% CI = 1.31-3.76; and (iv) stillbirth: OR = 2.19; 95% CI = 0.55-8.76. After adjustment for covariates, particularly smoking, the risks were attenuated but remained significant. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians should be aware of the increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with affective psychosis, some of which may be preventable.
PubMed ID
17430307 View in PubMed
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An examination of the relationship of homelessness to mental disorder, criminal behaviour, and health care in a pretrial jail population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211183
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1996 Sep;41(7):435-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
P A Zapf
R. Roesch
S D Hart
Author Affiliation
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1996 Sep;41(7):435-40
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Crime - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Homeless Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Patient Care Team - utilization
Personality Assessment
Prisoners - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To examine the prevalence of homelessness and its relationship to mental disorder, criminal behaviour, and health care.
Interview and file data were collected for 790 male admissions to a large, pretrial jail facility over a 12-month period.
A significant relationship was found between homelessness and severe mental disorder as well as between homelessness and prior psychiatric history. There were no significant differences found between the homeless and the nonhomeless on the types of crimes for which they were incarcerated or on contact with health care services within the past year.
The findings indicate the need for a link between the jail and community services for homeless individuals.
Notes
Erratum In: Can J Psychiatry 1997 Mar;42(2):212
PubMed ID
8884032 View in PubMed
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Are sociodemographic factors and year of delivery associated with hospital admission for postpartum psychosis? A study of 500,000 first-time mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29669
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2005 Jul;112(1):47-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
A. Nager
L-M Johansson
K. Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Center for Family Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2005 Jul;112(1):47-53
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Demography
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Parity
Postpartum Period - psychology
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between first hospital admissions due to postpartum psychosis and the explanatory variables age, educational level, marital status and year of delivery. METHOD: All Swedish first-time mothers (n = 502,767) were included during a 12-year period and followed for first hospital admissions due to postpartum psychosis. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios, adjusted for the explanatory variables. RESULTS: Older age and being a single mother implied an increased risk of first hospital admissions due to postpartum psychosis among first-time mothers. Educational level was not associated with first hospital admissions due to postpartum psychosis. During the 1990s, when a reduction in psychiatric beds occurred, first hospital admissions due to postpartum psychosis decreased significantly. CONCLUSION: Certain sociodemographic factors are associated with first hospital admissions due to postpartum psychosis. Untreated postpartum psychosis due to fewer psychiatric beds could have hazardous effects on mothers and their children.
PubMed ID
15952945 View in PubMed
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Childhood adversity specificity and dose-response effect in non-affective first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269845
Source
Schizophr Res. 2015 Jun;165(1):52-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Anne Marie Trauelsen
Sarah Bendall
Jens Einar Jansen
Hanne-Grethe Lyse Nielsen
Marlene Buch Pedersen
Christopher Høier Trier
Ulrik H Haahr
Erik Simonsen
Source
Schizophr Res. 2015 Jun;165(1):52-9
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Child Abuse - psychology
Denmark
Female
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Logistic Models
Male
Psychopathology
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Reviews conclude that childhood and adolescence sexual, physical, emotional abuse and emotional and physical neglect are all risk factors for psychosis. However, studies suggest only some adversities are associated with psychosis. Dose-response effects of several adversities on risk of psychosis have not been consistently found. The current study aimed to explore adversity specificity and dose-response effects of adversities on risk of psychosis.
Participants were 101 persons with first-episode psychosis (FEP) diagnosed with ICD-10 F20 - F29 (except F21) and 101 non-clinical control persons matched by gender, age and parents' socio-economic status. Assessment included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and parts of the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire.
Eighty-nine percent of the FEP group reported one or more adversities compared to 37% of the control group. Childhood and adolescent sexual, physical, emotional abuse, and physical and emotional neglect, separation and institutionalization were about four to 17 times higher for the FEP group (all p
PubMed ID
25868932 View in PubMed
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Clinical characterization of late- and very late-onset first psychotic episode in psychiatric inpatients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156920
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2008 Jun;16(6):478-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Caroline Girard
Martine Simard
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, Laval University, QC, Canada. caroline.girard.6@ulaval.ca
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2008 Jun;16(6):478-87
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delusions - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Quebec
Retrospective Studies
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Abstract
The goals of this study were to investigate the prevalence and initial symptoms of the late-onset schizophrenia (LOS: >40 years) and very-late-onset schizophrenia-like psychosis (VLOSLP: >60 years) nosological groups proposed by the International Late-Onset Schizophrenia Group.
This was a retrospective, cross-sectional, chart review study.
The study was conducted at Centre Hospitalier Robert-Giffard (CHRG), Quebec City, Canada.
The medical records of inpatients from the CHRG who presented with psychotic symptoms were analyzed.
Positive and negative symptoms were scored using the SAPS and SANS. Groups' symptoms were compared using chi(2), Fisher's exact tests, t tests, and exact Mann-Whitney tests. An exact conditional logistic regression analysis was performed to determine which clinical characteristics were the most predictive of the groups' classification.
Among the 1,767 unique, first-admission medical records reviewed, 23 (1.3%) inpatients developed their first psychotic symptoms at the age of 40-59 years old (LOS), and 13 (0.7%) at the age of 60 years and above (VLOSLP). LOS patients were more apathetic and presented more abnormal psychomotor activity than the VLOSLP. Persecutory delusions, auditory hallucinations, inappropriate social behavior, formal thought disorders and anhedonia were frequent in the two groups. A logistic regression model including psychomotor abnormalities was statistically relevant to predict the belonging to LOS group.
LOS and VLOSLP are rare. Abnormal psychomotor activity can properly differentiate VLOSLP and LOS. The nosological model proposed by the International Late-Onset Schizophrenia Group is at least partially supported by the present data.
PubMed ID
18515692 View in PubMed
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A community intervention for early identification of first episode psychosis: impact on duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and patient characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174741
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2005 May;40(5):337-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Ashok Malla
Ross Norman
Derek Scholten
Rahul Manchanda
Terry McLean
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Montréal (QC), Canada. ashok.malla@douglas.mcgill.ca
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2005 May;40(5):337-44
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Community Mental Health Services
Early Diagnosis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a community case identification program on duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) (a measure of delay in treatment) and characteristics of patients entering treatment for a first episode of psychosis.
Using a quasi-experimental historical control design, patients within a defined geographic catchment area who met DSM-IV criteria for a first episode of a psychotic disorder (FEP) were assessed on a number of demographic and clinical variables including DUP, length of prodromal period and symptoms at initial presentation, for 2 years prior to and 2 years after the introduction of a community-wide Early Case Identification Program (ECIP). The ECIP was designed to promote early recognition and referral of individuals with a FEP from any possible source of referral including self-referrals. Treatment interventions offered were the same throughout the two phases.
In all, 88 and 100 patients met criteria respectively in phases I and II. There were no significant differences in rates of treated incidence or DUP between the two phases. Patients recruited in phase II had significantly longer prodromal periods and higher level of psychotic and disorganization symptoms. There were no differences in level of negative symptoms or pre-morbid adjustment.
A community-wide approach to early case identification may not be the most effective way to reduce delay in treatment of psychosis, but may bring into treatment patients who have been ill for long periods of time and have a higher level of psychopathology. A more targeted approach directed at primary care and emergency services may achieve different results in reducing delay in treatment.
PubMed ID
15902403 View in PubMed
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Comorbidity of Axis I and II mental disorders with schizophrenia and psychotic disorders: findings from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149265
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2009 Jul;54(7):477-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Katherine A McMillan
Murray W Enns
Brian James Cox
Jitender Sareen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2009 Jul;54(7):477-86
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Bipolar Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Canada
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Psychotropic Drugs
Quality of Life - psychology
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the comorbidity of Axis I and II disorders within a community-based sample of adults with schizophrenia.
The study was conducted using data from the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions. A diagnosis of schizophrenia was based on respondents' self-report that they had been diagnosed by a health professional with schizophrenia or a psychotic illness or episode (SPIE). Axis I disorders and Axis II personality disorders (PDs) were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorders and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule. Mental and physical quality of life were assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 12 questionnaire.
The prevalence of SPIE was 0.9%. We used multiple logistic regression to examine the association between the presence and absence of SPIE in Axis I and II mental disorders. Each of the Axis I and II mental disorders examined were significantly associated with a diagnosis of SPIE after controlling for age, sex, education, marital status, and household income.
Clinicians should be aware of the patterns and extent of psychiatric comorbidities that may exist in schizophrenia. Possible mechanisms of these associations are discussed.
PubMed ID
19660170 View in PubMed
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54 records – page 1 of 6.