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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Determining rates of hepatitis C in a clozapine treated cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142375
Source
Schizophr Res. 2010 Dec;124(1-3):86-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Sanjeev Sockalingam
Chekkera Shammi
Valerie Powell
Lucy Barker
Gary Remington
Author Affiliation
Psychiatry, Health and Disease Division, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sanjeev.sockalingam@uhn.on.ca
Source
Schizophr Res. 2010 Dec;124(1-3):86-90
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Intranasal
Adult
Alcoholism
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Clozapine - therapeutic use
Cocaine-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Hepacivirus - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - virology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine the prevalence rates of hepatitis C in patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder being treated with clozapine.
Clozapine-treated outpatients and inpatients were recruited from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Schizophrenia Program in Toronto, Canada. All subjects had liver function tests, and positive HCV status was defined as a positive qualitative HCV RNA assay. Subjects completed a self-report questionnaire assessing HCV risk factors, past history of liver disease, previous diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), past hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and current alcohol use.
110 subjects participated in the study and the HCV prevalence rate (antibody and viremia-positive) was 2.7%, compared to a 0.8% prevalence rate in Canada. All study subjects had established housing, none reported a history of HIV, and only one patient had a history of HBV infection. A total of 9% drank two or more drinks on a typical day drinking and 7% endorsed having six or more drinks on one occasion at least monthly. Two of 3HCV-viremia positive subjects had HCV risk factors, specifically intravenous drug use and intranasal cocaine use. There was no difference between HCV infected and HCV negative subjects on liver function tests.
Our study demonstrates elevated rates of HCV in clozapine-treated patients compared to the general population in Canada and are congruent with reports from United States centres. Our study highlights the importance of homelessness and patterns of high-risk behaviour when interpreting HCV prevalence rates in this sub-population of patients and should be explored in future studies.
PubMed ID
20605572 View in PubMed
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Early Predictors of Ten-Year Course in First-Episode Psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279449
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Apr 01;67(4):438-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-01-2016
Author
Svein Friis
Ingrid Melle
Jan Olav Johannessen
Jan Ivar Røssberg
Helene Eidsmo Barder
Julie Horgen Evensen
Ulrik Haahr
Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad
Inge Joa
Johannes Langeveld
Tor Ketil Larsen
Stein Opjordsmoen
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Erik Simonsen
Per Wiggen Vaglum
Thomas H McGlashan
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Apr 01;67(4):438-43
Date
Apr-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Remission Induction
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Social Skills
Time Factors
Abstract
Identifying patients at risk of poor outcome at an early stage of illness can aid in treatment planning. This study sought to create a best-fit statistical model of known baseline and early-course risk factors to predict time in psychosis during a ten-year follow-up period after a first psychotic episode.
Between 1997 and 2000, 301 patients with DSM-IV nonorganic, nonaffective first-episode psychosis were recruited consecutively from catchment area-based sectors in Norway and Denmark. Specialized mental health personnel evaluated patients at baseline, three months, and one, two, five, and ten years (N=186 at ten years). Time in psychosis was defined as time with scores =4 on any of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale items P1, P3, P5, P6, and G9. Evaluations were retrospective, based on clinical interviews and all available clinical information. During the first two years, patients were also evaluated by their clinicians at least biweekly. Baseline and early-course predictors of long-term course were identified with linear mixed-model analyses.
Four variables provided significant, additive predictions of longer time in psychosis during the ten-year follow-up: deterioration in premorbid social functioning, duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) of =26 weeks, core schizophrenia spectrum disorder, and no remission within three months.
First-episode psychosis patients should be followed carefully after the start of treatment. If symptoms do not remit within three months with adequate treatment, there is a considerable risk of a poor long-term outcome, particularly for patients with a deterioration in premorbid social functioning, a DUP of at least half a year, and a diagnosis within the core schizophrenia spectrum.
PubMed ID
26567932 View in PubMed
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First episode psychosis and comorbid ADHD, autism and intellectual disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298915
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2019 01; 55:18-22
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2019
Author
Pontus Strålin
Jerker Hetta
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: pontus.stralin@sll.se.
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2019 01; 55:18-22
Date
01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology
Autistic Disorder - diagnosis - diet therapy - epidemiology
Central Nervous System Stimulants - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Episode of Care
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Intellectual Disability - epidemiology
Male
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Comorbidity between neurodevelopmental disorders and psychotic disorders is common, but little is known about how neurodevelopmental disorders influence the presentation and outcome of first episode psychosis.
A nation-wide cohort (n?=?2091) with a first hospitalization for psychosis between 2007-2011 and at ages between 16-25?at intake was identified from Swedish population registries. Comorbid diagnoses of neurodevelopmental disorders were identified at first psychosis hospitalization and for ADHD also by dispensations of psychostimulants before the first psychosis hospitalization. Data from the registers on hospitalizations and dispensations of antipsychotic and psychostimulant medications during the year before and 2?years after the first psychosis hospitalization were analysed. Self-harm and substance use disorders were identified by ICD10 codes at hospitalizations.
2.5% of the cohort was identified with a diagnosis of intellectual disability, 5.0% with autism and 8.1% with ADHD. A larger proportion of cases with Autism (OR?=?1.8, p?
PubMed ID
30384107 View in PubMed
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Remission in prognosis of functional outcome: a new dimension in the treatment of patients with psychotic disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164372
Source
Schizophr Res. 2007 Jul;93(1-3):160-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Lars Helldin
John M Kane
Ulla Karilampi
Torsten Norlander
Trevor Archer
Author Affiliation
The NU Health Care, Department of Psychiatry, SE-461 85 Trollhättan, Sweden.
Source
Schizophr Res. 2007 Jul;93(1-3):160-8
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification - psychology
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Combined Modality Therapy
Delusions - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Social Adjustment
Social Support
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate whether or not the new concept of remission in the treatment of schizophrenia is of importance for functional outcome. The hypothesis was that patients having attained remission would function at a higher level and have a lower care requirement than those who had not attained remission.
Remission is defined through the application of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) instrument whereby none of the eight chosen items, representing core symptoms, should be found to present a value exceeding 3 points. The utility of attaining the severity criteria for remission, or not, was examined with regard to activity of daily living (ADL) ability, establishment of social functioning and social network, and amount of health care and community support that the patient consumed. Two hundred and forty-three patients were examined, of whom 93 patients (38%) had attained remission and 150 patients (62%) had not. The present patient population, consisting of 50% of all available patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder within a homogeneous catchment area in NU Health Care, western Sweden, meeting the right diagnostic criteria, were in their habitual condition and were unaffected by any other functionally debilitating disorder, in particular dementia. As a control patients diagnoses were used as the independent variable to exclude that they better explain outcome than remission.
It was found that patients that attainted the specified remission criteria showed a significantly superior outcome in all assessed areas with regard to activity of daily life, social functioning in society and consumption of health care. Remission patients functioned more effectively in social contexts in association with superior education, more often had occupations, possessed more established social networks and were more likely to be found living under family-like conditions. They exhibited a lower need for support in order to fulfill their everyday activities. Also, patients in remission required markedly less health care resources, both in the form of psychiatric treatment and community habitation support. In contrast diagnoses only made difference in 4 of 14 outcome parameters.
The results suggest that the concept of remission has important implications for the treatment of patients with chronic psychosis. One possible conclusion is that if more patients attain remission, the patient's and society's burden resulting from the illness will decrease.
PubMed ID
17395430 View in PubMed
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Visual impairment in persons with psychotic disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161452
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Nov;42(11):902-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Satu Viertiö
Arja Laitinen
Jonna Perälä
Samuli I Saarni
Seppo Koskinen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Jaana Suvisaari
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, National Public Health Institute, Mannerheimintie 166, 00300, Helsinki, Finland. satu.viertio@ktl.fi
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Nov;42(11):902-8
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cataract - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Macular Degeneration - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Vision Disorders - chemically induced - diagnosis - epidemiology
Vision Screening - utilization
Visual acuity
Abstract
Persons with psychotic disorder may have poorer visual acuity (VA). The aim of the study is to investigate in a general population the prevalence of impaired habitual VA and self-reported difficulties in vision among persons with different psychotic disorders.
A nationally representative sample of 6,663 persons aged 30 or older whose binocular VA for distance and for near vision was measured with current spectacles, if any. Diagnostic assessment of DSM-IV psychotic disorders used both SCID interview and case note data. Life-time ever diagnoses of psychotic disorders were classified into schizophrenia, other non-affective psychotic disorders and affective psychoses.
After adjusting for age and sex, schizophrenia was associated with significantly increased odds of having visual impairment for distance (OR 5.04, P
PubMed ID
17846698 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.