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19 records – page 1 of 2.

[Acute delusional psychosis and neuroleptic malignant syndrome after emigration of a Russian German patient].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208497
Source
Psychiatr Prax. 1997 May;24(3):147-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
J. Podschus
J. Kirsch
R. van Heys
B. Winzer
Author Affiliation
Psychiatrische Klinik Intensiv- und Kriseninterventionsstation Freie Universität Berlin.
Source
Psychiatr Prax. 1997 May;24(3):147-9
Date
May-1997
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Delusions - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Drug Therapy, Combination
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Germany
Haloperidol - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Methotrimeprazine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Paranoid Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Siberia - ethnology
Abstract
Emigration is often followed by psychic disorders. The special issue of Germans from the GUS-States immigrating to Germany is presented. The modus of paranoid reaction is discussed along the biography and the criteria of ICD 10. The acute paranoid psychosis was complicated by a neuroleptic malignant syndrome.
PubMed ID
9273559 View in PubMed
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Association between financial strain, social network and five-year recovery from first episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92848
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2008 Dec;43(12):947-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Mattsson Maria
Topor Alain
Cullberg Johan
Forsell Yvonne
Author Affiliation
Dept of Psychiatry, R & D Section, The Parachute Project, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. maria.mattsson@sll.se
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2008 Dec;43(12):947-52
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - rehabilitation
Questionnaires
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - rehabilitation
Schizophrenic Psychology
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - economics
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Despite much effort to positively affect long-term outcome in psychosis and schizophrenia many patients are still facing a poor outcome with persistent psychotic symptoms and decline in social functioning. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between financial strain and social network and five-year outcome of first episode psychosis (FEP). FEP patients were divided into recovered (n = 52) and non-recovered (n = 19). Each person was matched according to age and gender with four persons (n = 284) from a longitudinal population-based study. All persons had answered an extensive questionnaire including social network, quantitative and qualitative, financial strain and mental health. Linear regression analysis showed that both financial strain and social network were associated, and had a unique contribution, to outcome. The results indicate that FEP patients might benefit from interventions that reduce financial strain thus facilitating daily life and cultural and social activities.
PubMed ID
18604620 View in PubMed
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Determining rates of hepatitis C in a clozapine treated cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142375
Source
Schizophr Res. 2010 Dec;124(1-3):86-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Sanjeev Sockalingam
Chekkera Shammi
Valerie Powell
Lucy Barker
Gary Remington
Author Affiliation
Psychiatry, Health and Disease Division, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sanjeev.sockalingam@uhn.on.ca
Source
Schizophr Res. 2010 Dec;124(1-3):86-90
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Intranasal
Adult
Alcoholism
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Clozapine - therapeutic use
Cocaine-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Hepacivirus - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - virology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine the prevalence rates of hepatitis C in patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder being treated with clozapine.
Clozapine-treated outpatients and inpatients were recruited from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Schizophrenia Program in Toronto, Canada. All subjects had liver function tests, and positive HCV status was defined as a positive qualitative HCV RNA assay. Subjects completed a self-report questionnaire assessing HCV risk factors, past history of liver disease, previous diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), past hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and current alcohol use.
110 subjects participated in the study and the HCV prevalence rate (antibody and viremia-positive) was 2.7%, compared to a 0.8% prevalence rate in Canada. All study subjects had established housing, none reported a history of HIV, and only one patient had a history of HBV infection. A total of 9% drank two or more drinks on a typical day drinking and 7% endorsed having six or more drinks on one occasion at least monthly. Two of 3HCV-viremia positive subjects had HCV risk factors, specifically intravenous drug use and intranasal cocaine use. There was no difference between HCV infected and HCV negative subjects on liver function tests.
Our study demonstrates elevated rates of HCV in clozapine-treated patients compared to the general population in Canada and are congruent with reports from United States centres. Our study highlights the importance of homelessness and patterns of high-risk behaviour when interpreting HCV prevalence rates in this sub-population of patients and should be explored in future studies.
PubMed ID
20605572 View in PubMed
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Early detection strategies for untreated first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71893
Source
Schizophr Res. 2001 Aug 1;51(1):39-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2001
Author
J O Johannessen
T H McGlashan
T K Larsen
M. Horneland
I. Joa
S. Mardal
R. Kvebaek
S. Friis
I. Melle
S. Opjordsmoen
E. Simonsen
H. Ulrik
P. Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Rogaland Psychiatric Hospital, P.O. Box 1163, Hillevåg, 4095, Stavanger, Norway. joj@rps.no
Source
Schizophr Res. 2001 Aug 1;51(1):39-46
Date
Aug-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Denmark
Ethics, Medical
Female
Health education
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy
Referral and Consultation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy
Schizotypal Personality Disorder - diagnosis - drug therapy
Abstract
Some studies in first-episode schizophrenia correlate shorter duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) with better prognosis, suggesting that timing of treatment may be important. A three-site prospective clinical trial in Norway and Denmark is underway to investigate the effect of the timing of treatment in first-episode psychosis. One health care sector (Rogaland, Norway) is experimental and has developed an early detection (ED) system to reduce DUP. Two other sectors (Ullevål, Norway, and Roskilde, Denmark) are comparison sectors and rely on existing detection and referral systems for first-episode cases. The study ultimately will compare early detected with usual detected patients. This paper describes the study's major independent intervention variable, i.e. a comprehensive education and detection system to change DUP in first onset psychosis.System variables and first results from the four-year inclusion period (1997-2000) are described. It includes targeted information towards the general public, health professionals and schools, and ED teams to recruit appropriate patients into treatment as soon as possible. This plus easy access to psychiatric services via ED teams systematically changed referral patterns of first-episode schizophrenia. DUP was reduced by 1.5 years (mean) from before the time the ED system was instituted (to 0.5 years). The ED strategies appear to be effective and to influence directly the community's help-seeking behaviour.
PubMed ID
11479064 View in PubMed
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Early Predictors of Ten-Year Course in First-Episode Psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279449
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Apr 01;67(4):438-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-01-2016
Author
Svein Friis
Ingrid Melle
Jan Olav Johannessen
Jan Ivar Røssberg
Helene Eidsmo Barder
Julie Horgen Evensen
Ulrik Haahr
Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad
Inge Joa
Johannes Langeveld
Tor Ketil Larsen
Stein Opjordsmoen
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Erik Simonsen
Per Wiggen Vaglum
Thomas H McGlashan
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Apr 01;67(4):438-43
Date
Apr-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Remission Induction
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Social Skills
Time Factors
Abstract
Identifying patients at risk of poor outcome at an early stage of illness can aid in treatment planning. This study sought to create a best-fit statistical model of known baseline and early-course risk factors to predict time in psychosis during a ten-year follow-up period after a first psychotic episode.
Between 1997 and 2000, 301 patients with DSM-IV nonorganic, nonaffective first-episode psychosis were recruited consecutively from catchment area-based sectors in Norway and Denmark. Specialized mental health personnel evaluated patients at baseline, three months, and one, two, five, and ten years (N=186 at ten years). Time in psychosis was defined as time with scores =4 on any of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale items P1, P3, P5, P6, and G9. Evaluations were retrospective, based on clinical interviews and all available clinical information. During the first two years, patients were also evaluated by their clinicians at least biweekly. Baseline and early-course predictors of long-term course were identified with linear mixed-model analyses.
Four variables provided significant, additive predictions of longer time in psychosis during the ten-year follow-up: deterioration in premorbid social functioning, duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) of =26 weeks, core schizophrenia spectrum disorder, and no remission within three months.
First-episode psychosis patients should be followed carefully after the start of treatment. If symptoms do not remit within three months with adequate treatment, there is a considerable risk of a poor long-term outcome, particularly for patients with a deterioration in premorbid social functioning, a DUP of at least half a year, and a diagnosis within the core schizophrenia spectrum.
PubMed ID
26567932 View in PubMed
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First episode psychosis and comorbid ADHD, autism and intellectual disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298915
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2019 01; 55:18-22
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2019
Author
Pontus Strålin
Jerker Hetta
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: pontus.stralin@sll.se.
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2019 01; 55:18-22
Date
01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology
Autistic Disorder - diagnosis - diet therapy - epidemiology
Central Nervous System Stimulants - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Episode of Care
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Intellectual Disability - epidemiology
Male
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Comorbidity between neurodevelopmental disorders and psychotic disorders is common, but little is known about how neurodevelopmental disorders influence the presentation and outcome of first episode psychosis.
A nation-wide cohort (n?=?2091) with a first hospitalization for psychosis between 2007-2011 and at ages between 16-25?at intake was identified from Swedish population registries. Comorbid diagnoses of neurodevelopmental disorders were identified at first psychosis hospitalization and for ADHD also by dispensations of psychostimulants before the first psychosis hospitalization. Data from the registers on hospitalizations and dispensations of antipsychotic and psychostimulant medications during the year before and 2?years after the first psychosis hospitalization were analysed. Self-harm and substance use disorders were identified by ICD10 codes at hospitalizations.
2.5% of the cohort was identified with a diagnosis of intellectual disability, 5.0% with autism and 8.1% with ADHD. A larger proportion of cases with Autism (OR?=?1.8, p?
PubMed ID
30384107 View in PubMed
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Five-year follow-up of a randomized multicenter trial of intensive early intervention vs standard treatment for patients with a first episode of psychotic illness: the OPUS trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92842
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;65(7):762-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Bertelsen Mette
Jeppesen Pia
Petersen Lone
Thorup Anne
Øhlenschlaeger Johan
le Quach Phuong
Christensen Torben Østergaard
Krarup Gertrud
Jørgensen Per
Nordentoft Merete
Author Affiliation
Bispebjerg Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. mbe_76@yahoo.dk
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;65(7):762-71
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Assertiveness
Community Mental Health Centers
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Cost of Illness
Family Therapy - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Male
Periodicity
Problem Solving
Program Development
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - therapy
Recurrence - prevention & control
Severity of Illness Index
Socialization
Teaching - methods
Time Factors
Abstract
CONTEXT: Intensive early treatment for first-episode psychosis has been shown to be effective. It is unknown if the positive effects are sustained for 5 years. OBJECTIVE: To determine the long-term effects of an intensive early-intervention program (OPUS) for first-episode psychotic patients. DESIGN: Single-blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial of 2 years of an intensive early-intervention program vs standard treatment. Follow-up periods were 2 and 5 years. SETTING: Copenhagen Hospital Corporation and Psychiatric Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. Patients A total of 547 patients with a first episode of psychosis. Of these, 369 patients were participating in a 2-year follow-up, and 301 were participating in a 5-year follow-up. A total of 547 patients were followed for 5 years. INTERVENTIONS: Two years of an intensive early-intervention program vs standard treatment. The intensive early-intervention treatment consisted of assertive community treatment, family involvement, and social skills training. Standard treatment offered contact with a community mental health center. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Psychotic and negative symptoms were recorded. Secondary outcome measures were use of services and social functioning. RESULTS: Analysis was based on the principles of intention-to-treat. Assessment was blinded for previous treatment allocation. At the 5-year follow-up, the effect of treatment seen after 2 years (psychotic dimension odds ratio [OR], -0.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.58 to -0.06; P = .02; negative dimension OR, -0.45; 95% CI, -0.67 to -0.22; P = .001) had equalized between the treatment groups. A significantly smaller percentage of patients from the experimental group were living in supported housing (4% vs 10%, respectively; OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.1-4.8; P = .02) and were hospitalized fewer days (mean, 149 vs 193 days; mean difference, 44 days; 95% CI, 0.15-88.12; P = .05) during the 5-year period. CONCLUSIONS: The intensive early-intervention program improved clinical outcome after 2 years, but the effects were not sustainable up to 5 years later. Secondary outcome measures showed differences in the proportion of patients living in supported housing and days in hospital at the 5-year follow-up in favor of the intensive early-intervention program.
PubMed ID
18606949 View in PubMed
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Implementation of a rational pharmacotherapy intervention for inpatients at a psychiatric department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92787
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):242-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Sorensen Lene
Nielsen Bent
Stage Kurt B
Brøsen Kim
Damkier Per
Author Affiliation
Amgros I/S, Dampfaergevej 22, København Ø, Denmark. lso@amgros.dl
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):242-9
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Denmark
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Therapy, Combination
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Patient Admission
Patient compliance
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy
Schizophrenic Psychology
Abstract
The objective of the study was to develop, implement and evaluate two treatment algorithms for schizophrenia and depression at a psychiatric hospital department. The treatment algorithms were based on available literature and developed in collaboration between psychiatrists, clinical pharmacologists and a clinical pharmacist. The treatment algorithms were introduced at a meeting for all psychiatrists, reinforced by the project psychiatrists in the daily routine and used for educational purposes of young doctors and medical students. A quantitative pre-post evaluation was conducted using data from medical charts, and qualitative information was collected by interviews. In general, no significant differences were found when comparing outcomes from 104 charts from the baseline period with 96 charts from the post-intervention period. Most of the patients (65% in the post-intervention period) admitted during the data collection periods did not receive any medication changes. Of the patients undergoing medication changes in the post-intervention period, 56% followed the algorithms, and 70% of the patients admitted to the psychiatric hospital department for the first time had their medications changed according to the algorithms. All of the 10 interviewed doctors found the algorithms useful. The treatment algorithms were successfully implemented with a high degree of satisfaction among the interviewed doctors. The majority of patients admitted to the psychiatric hospital department for the first time had their medications changed according to the algorithms.
PubMed ID
18622885 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.