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A 2-year follow-up study of people with severe mental illness involved in psychosocial rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257843
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Petra Svedberg
Bengt Svensson
Lars Hansson
Henrika Jormfeldt
Author Affiliation
Petra Svedberg, Associate Professor, School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University , Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Prospective Studies
Psychotherapy - methods
Quality of Life
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUNDS. A focus on psychiatric rehabilitation in order to support recovery among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) has been given great attention in research and mental health policy, but less impact on clinical practice. Despite the potential impact of psychiatric rehabilitation on health and wellbeing, there is a lack of research regarding the model called the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach from Boston University (BPR).
The aim was to investigate the outcome of the BPR intervention regarding changes in life situation, use of healthcare services, quality of life, health, psychosocial functioning and empowerment.
The study has a prospective longitudinal design and the setting was seven mental health services who worked with the BPR in the county of Halland in Sweden. In total, 71 clients completed the assessment at baseline and of these 49 completed the 2-year follow-up assessments.
The most significant finding was an improved psychosocial functioning at the follow-up assessment. Furthermore, 65% of the clients reported that they had mainly or almost completely achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals at the 2-year follow-up. There were significant differences with regard to health, empowerment, quality of life and psychosocial functioning for those who reported that they had mainly/completely had achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals compared to those who reported that they only had to a small extent or not at all reached their goals.
Our results indicate that the BPR approach has impact on clients' health, empowerment, quality of life and in particular concerning psychosocial functioning.
PubMed ID
24228778 View in PubMed
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Active multimodal psychotherapy in children and adolescents with suicidality: description, evaluation and clinical profile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92095
Source
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;13(3):435-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Högberg Goran
Hällström Tore
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. gor.hogberg@gmail.com
Source
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;13(3):435-48
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Ambulatory Care Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Child
Combined Modality Therapy
Desensitization, Psychologic - methods
Eye Movements - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Program Evaluation - methods
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychodrama - methods
Psychotherapy - methods
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate the clinical pattern of 14 youths with presenting suicidality, to describe an integrative treatment approach, and to estimate therapy effectiveness. Fourteen patients aged 10 to 18 years from a child and adolescent outpatient clinic in Stockholm were followed in a case series. The patients were treated with active multimodal psychotherapy. This consisted of mood charting by mood-maps, psycho-education, wellbeing practice and trauma resolution. Active techniques were psychodrama and body-mind focused techniques including eye movement desensitization and reprocessing. The patients were assessed before treatment, immediately after treatment and at 22 months post treatment with the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. The clinical pattern of the group was observed. After treatment there was a significant change towards normality in the Global Assessment of Functioning scale both immediately post-treatment and at 22 months. A clinical pattern, post trauma suicidal reaction, was observed with a combination of suicidality, insomnia, bodily symptoms and disturbed mood regulation. We conclude that in the post trauma reaction suicidality might be a presenting symptom in young people. Despite the shortcomings of a case series the results of this study suggest that a mood-map-based multimodal treatment approach with active techniques might be of value in the treatment of children and youth with suicidality.
PubMed ID
18783125 View in PubMed
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Activities of counsellors in a hospice/palliative care environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191781
Source
J Palliat Care. 2001;17(4):229-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
M. Thompson
C. Rose
W. Wainwright
L. Mattar
M. Scanlan
Author Affiliation
Victoria Hospice Society, Royal Jubilee Hospital, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2001;17(4):229-35
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Hospices
Humans
Male
Palliative Care - methods
Professional-Family Relations
Psychotherapy - methods
Social Support
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
This study examined activities related to the provision of psychosocial care by counsellors in the hospice/palliative care setting. A qualitative design using written reports was used in an urban Canadian hospice/palliative care program. A convenient sample of 13 counsellors indicated the activities they typically performed in their work with patients and families. Thematic analysis of the activities directly related to patient and family care was performed and then validated by presenting these activities back to the counsellors in a group setting. Seven themes resulted: 1) companioning; 2) psychosocial assessment, planning, and evaluation; 3) counselling interventions; 4) facilitation and advocacy; 5) patient and family education; 6) consultation and reporting; and 7) team support. These thematic findings confirmed those of previous studies and also highlighted two additional findings. Team support was seen as an activity that directly affected client care, and there was a strong emphasis on the activity of companioning the dying and their families. Also discussed are implications of these results, as well as suggestions for further research.
PubMed ID
11813339 View in PubMed
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Adolescent development and psychosocial functioning after starting cross-sex hormones for gender dysphoria.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308019
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2020 Apr; 74(3):213-219
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2020
Author
Riittakerttu Kaltiala
Elias Heino
Marja Työläjärvi
Laura Suomalainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Adolescent Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2020 Apr; 74(3):213-219
Date
Apr-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - drug effects - physiology - psychology
Adolescent Development - drug effects - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gender Dysphoria - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Gender Identity
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - administration & dosage
Humans
Male
Psychotherapy - methods
Retrospective Studies
Transsexualism - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Purpose: To assess how adolescent development progresses and psychiatric symptoms develop among transsexual adolescents after starting cross-sex hormone treatment.Materials and methods: Retrospective chart review among 52 adolescents who came into gender identity assessment before age 18, were diagnosed with transsexualism and started hormonal gender reassignment. The subjects were followed over the so-called real-life phase of gender reassignment.Results: Those who did well in terms of psychiatric symptoms and functioning before cross-sex hormones mainly did well during real-life. Those who had psychiatric treatment needs or problems in school, peer relationships and managing everyday matters outside of home continued to have problems during real-life.Conclusion: Medical gender reassignment is not enough to improve functioning and relieve psychiatric comorbidities among adolescents with gender dysphoria. Appropriate interventions are warranted for psychiatric comorbidities and problems in adolescent development.
PubMed ID
31762394 View in PubMed
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[Agents, methods and environments against suicide]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68447
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Apr 16;94(16):1525-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-16-1997
Author
J. Thorson
Author Affiliation
Karolinska institutet, Riksförsäkringsverkets sjukhus, Nynäshamn.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Apr 16;94(16):1525-7
Date
Apr-16-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage
Environment
Humans
Psychotherapy - methods
Risk factors
Suicide - prevention & control
Sweden
PubMed ID
9173201 View in PubMed
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[Alternative forms of treatment of psychiatric patients]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57219
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Mar 11;153(11):782-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-1991
Author
H. Raben
K H Aggernaes
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk afdeling D, Frederiksberg Hospital.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Mar 11;153(11):782-4
Date
Mar-11-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Complementary Therapies - statistics & numerical data
Costs and Cost Analysis
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Psychotherapy - methods
Sex Factors
Abstract
In the Psychiatric Department of Frederiksberg Hospital, 115 of all 153 admitted patients were interviewed about their use of alternative treatment. Information obtained from the interviews was compared with data in the case records. Of the 115 patients interviewed, 42% had used alternative treatment at least once, while 17% had used alternative treatment within the past three months before the interview. Herbal medicine was the most frequent type of treatment. Nearly one half of the patients wanted treatment because of somatic problems. The frequency of alternative treatment decreased with age. Compared to the entire investigation group, those diagnosed as manic-depressive used alternative treatment more frequently, while schizophrenic patients used this kind of treatment less often. The patients most satisfied with the psychiatric department used alternative treatment less frequently. Use of alternative treatment was not related to duration of disease, or whether the patients were in the ward 24 hours or only during day-time. Only 19 of the 48 patients who had used alternative treatment had paid more than 1,000 Dkr. (approximately pounds 85) in all for the treatment, and only three patients had paid more than 1,000 Dkr. during the past three months. Women had paid relatively more for their treatment than men.
PubMed ID
2008728 View in PubMed
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[An additional voice on psychiatric treatment methods].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252313
Source
Tidskr Sver Sjukskot. 1975 Apr 24;42(8):9, 11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-24-1975
Author
P. Eliasson
Source
Tidskr Sver Sjukskot. 1975 Apr 24;42(8):9, 11
Date
Apr-24-1975
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Psychotherapy - methods
Sweden
PubMed ID
1039173 View in PubMed
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An Auto-Ethnographic Study of "Open Dialogue": The Illumination of Snow.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276392
Source
Fam Process. 2015 Dec;54(4):716-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Mary Olson
Source
Fam Process. 2015 Dec;54(4):716-29
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Communication
Finland
Humans
Massachusetts
Mental Disorders - etiology - therapy
Psychological Theory
Psychotherapy - methods
Abstract
This auto-ethnographic study describes the changes in the author's thinking and clinical work connected to her first-hand experience of Open Dialogue, which is an innovative, psychosocial approach to severe psychiatric crises developed in Tornio, Finland. In charting this trajectory, there is an emphasis on three interrelated themes: the micropolitics of U.S. managed mental health care; the practice of "dialogicality" in Open Dialogue; and the historical, cultural, and scientific shifts that are encouraging the adaptation of Open Dialogue in the United States. The work of Gregory Bateson provides a conceptual framework that makes sense of the author's experience and the larger trends. The study portrays and underscores how family and network practices are essential to responding to psychiatric crises and should not be abandoned in favor of a reductionist, biomedical model.
PubMed ID
26133053 View in PubMed
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Anxiety management: Participants' experiences of a physiotherapeutic group treatment in Swedish psychiatric outpatient care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309757
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2020 Feb; 36(2):276-290
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2020
Author
Helena Ölund
Louise Danielsson
Susanne Rosberg
Author Affiliation
The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology Section for Physiotherapy, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2020 Feb; 36(2):276-290
Date
Feb-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care
Anxiety - therapy
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Humans
Physical Therapy Modalities
Psychotherapy - methods
Qualitative Research
Retrospective Studies
Self-Help Groups
Sweden
Abstract
Anxiety disorders are among the most persistent mental health syndromes. There is extensive research showing effectiveness of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy interventions targeting anxiety, while knowledge is still sparse for other treatment options. The aim of this study was to explore how participants with anxiety disorders experience a physiotherapeutic group treatment in psychiatric outpatient care, and their perceived ability to manage anxiety within two months after participating in the treatment. Semi-structured interviews with participants were conducted to explore experiences of the treatment. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis, which resulted in one main theme: Reconnecting to the body in the supportive atmosphere of a group. Six categories reflect the main theme: (1) sharing with others supported by the group, (2) grounding oneself in the body, (3) getting to know the body and learning to manage its reactions, (4) learning to tolerate bodily sensations of anxiety, (5) gaining a more compassionate attitude toward oneself, and (6) challenging old patterns to become more active in life. The participants reported that their ability to reconnect to their bodies increased so that anxious sensations became more endurable and acceptable after treatment. The supportive group context was described as valuable, enabling the participants to feel safe enough to start exploring new ways to manage anxiety. In conclusion, this study suggests that a physiotherapeutic group treatment can be a useful add-on treatment to the standard treatment models of anxiety disorders, including psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy, since it targets the embodied, nonverbal domain of anxiety.
PubMed ID
29913081 View in PubMed
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Apples don't fall far from the tree: influences on psychotherapists' adoption and sustained use of new therapies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151212
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2009 May;60(5):671-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Joan M Cook
Paula P Schnurr
Tatyana Biyanova
James C Coyne
Author Affiliation
Northeast Program Evaluation Center, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Connecticut Healthcare System, 950 Campbell Ave., West Haven, CT 06516, USA. joan.cook@yale.edu
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2009 May;60(5):671-6
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Demography
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Organizational Innovation
Physician's Practice Patterns - organization & administration
Psychotherapy - methods
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
The purpose of this investigation was to identify influences on the current clinical practices of a broad range of mental health providers as well as influences on their adoption and sustained use of new practices.
U.S. and Canadian psychotherapists (N=2,607) completed a Web-based survey in which they rated factors that influence their clinical practice, including their adoption and sustained use of new treatments.
Empirical evidence had little influence on the practice of mental health providers. Significant mentors, books, training in graduate school, and informal discussions with colleagues were the most highly endorsed influences on current practice. The greatest influences on psychotherapists' willingness to learn a new treatment were its potential for integration with the therapy they were already providing and its endorsement by therapists they respected. Clinicians were more often willing to continue to use a new treatment when they were able to effectively and enjoyably conduct the therapy and when their clients liked the therapy and reported improvement.
Implications for dissemination and sustained use of new psychotherapies by community psychotherapists are discussed. For example, evidence-based treatments may best be promoted through therapy courses and workshops, beginning with graduate studies; to ensure future use of new therapies, developers of training workshops should emphasize ways to integrate their approaches into clinicians' existing practices.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19411356 View in PubMed
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207 records – page 1 of 21.