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Adult recovered memories of childhood sexual abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211764
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1996 Jun;41(5):305-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996

[Dangers and therapist obligations: Canadian perspective].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214165
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1995 Oct;40(8):474-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
G. Melançon
E J Aubut
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Québec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1995 Oct;40(8):474-8
Date
Oct-1995
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Mental Disorders - therapy
Psychotherapy - legislation & jurisprudence
Violence
Abstract
To clarify the position Canadian therapists must adopt regarding their obligation to protect others against patients' potentially violent actions. This obligation is based on jurisprudence which has been well established in the United States since the Tarasoff case, but which does not apply in Canada.
A review of jurisprudence in Canada and recent clinical recommendations. The latter are then discussed in the Canadian context and followed by a range of suggested avenues to explore.
Professional standards could be established but they should be reviewed on a regular basis and allow flexibility for clinicians.
PubMed ID
8681271 View in PubMed
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Women's sexual exploitation in therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226529
Source
Univ Tor Fac Law Rev. 1991;49(2):42-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
J R Castel
Source
Univ Tor Fac Law Rev. 1991;49(2):42-67
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Criminal Law
Female
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Malpractice - legislation & jurisprudence
Mandatory Reporting
Professional Misconduct - legislation & jurisprudence
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychotherapy - legislation & jurisprudence
Sex Offenses - legislation & jurisprudence
United States
Women
Abstract
The incidence of therapist-patient sex is disturbingly high, and the obstacles to seeking legal redress against a sexually abusive therapist are numerous. The defence of consent is one of the most serious obstacles. Generally no physical coercion is involved; and the patient often believes she is consenting at the time in which sexual relations occur. The author explores how the defence of consent has been construed to bar women from succeeding in malpractice and sexual assault suits against sexually abusive therapists. Her thesis is that an understanding of the nature and dynamics of the therapeutic relationship leads to the conclusion that free and informed consent is not possible in this context. The author concludes with a discussion of whether a mandatory reporting law, requiring therapists to file a report with the relevant licencing authorities when they become aware that a current patient has engaged in sexual relations with a former therapist, would be desirable.
PubMed ID
12465637 View in PubMed
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