Skip header and navigation

Refine By

238 records – page 1 of 24.

1-year retention and social function after buprenorphine-assisted relapse prevention treatment for heroin dependence in Sweden: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186500
Source
Lancet. 2003 Feb 22;361(9358):662-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-2003
Author
Johan Kakko
Kerstin Dybrandt Svanborg
Mary Jeanne Kreek
Markus Heilig
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, Neurotec, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, S-141 86, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Lancet. 2003 Feb 22;361(9358):662-8
Date
Feb-22-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Buprenorphine - therapeutic use
Counseling
Female
Heroin Dependence - classification - drug therapy - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Narcotic Antagonists - therapeutic use
Psychotherapy, Group
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The partial opiate-receptor agonist buprenorphine has been suggested for treatment of heroin dependence, but there are few long-term and placebo-controlled studies of its effectiveness. We aimed to assess the 1-year efficacy of buprenorphine in combination with intensive psychosocial therapy for treatment of heroin dependence.
40 individuals aged older than 20 years, who met DSM-IV criteria for opiate dependence for at least 1 year, but did not fulfil Swedish legal criteria for methadone maintenance treatment were randomly allocated either to daily buprenorphine (fixed dose 16 mg sublingually for 12 months; supervised daily administration for a least 6 months, possible take-home doses thereafter) or a tapered 6 day regimen of buprenorphine, thereafter followed by placebo. All patients participated in cognitive-behavioural group therapy to prevent relapse, received weekly individual counselling sessions, and submitted thrice weekly supervised urine samples for analysis to detect illicit drug use. Our primary endpoint was 1-year retention in treatment and analysis was by intention to treat.
1-year retention in treatment was 75% and 0% in the buprenorphine and placebo groups, respectively (p=0.0001; risk ratio 58.7 [95% CI 7.4-467.4]). Urine screens were about 75% negative for illicit opiates, central stimulants, cannabinoids, and benzodiazepines in the patients remaining in treatment.
The combination of buprenorphine and intensive psychosocial treatment is safe and highly efficacious, and should be added to the treatment options available for individuals who are dependent on heroin.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2003 May 31;361(9372):1907; author reply 1907-812788596
Comment In: Lancet. 2003 Feb 22;361(9358):634-512606172
Comment In: Lancet. 2003 May 31;361(9372):1906-7; author reply 1907-812788595
PubMed ID
12606177 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A case of sexual abuse with several victims in a small municipality. A cooperation project between health services]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34559
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Nov 30;116(29):3506-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-1996
Author
M. Horneland
A M Hanstad
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk poliklinikk adveling Stavanger Rogaland psykiatriske sjukehus, Hillevåg, Stavanger.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Nov 30;116(29):3506-8
Date
Nov-30-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - therapy
Community Health Services
English Abstract
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Psychotherapy, Group
Social Support
Abstract
This article describes the management of an extensive case of sexual abuse in a small Norwegian community. The victims were adult men who had been exploited in childhood and adolescence by the same abuser. A demand for support was addressed to the health services when these men realised as adults that they shared this experience. The community health service and the psychiatric department decided to arrange psycho-educative meetings in the community centre. Victims, their families and local professional helpers were invited. The meetings gave general information about sexual abuse, early and late symptoms and the treatment facilities available locally. In one facility a psychiatrist and a general practitioner led a treatment group together. Five of the victims took part in this group. Fortunately, this case never reached the public press. Cooperation between specialist and community health services in managing such cases is regarded as essential.
PubMed ID
9019860 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptance and commitment group therapy for health anxiety--results from a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108574
Source
J Anxiety Disord. 2013 Jun;27(5):461-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
T. Eilenberg
L. Kronstrand
P. Fink
L. Frostholm
Author Affiliation
The Research Clinic for Functional Disorders and Psychosomatics, Aarhus University Hospital, Barthsgade 5.1, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.
Source
J Anxiety Disord. 2013 Jun;27(5):461-8
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypochondriasis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Questionnaires
Abstract
Health anxiety (or hypochondriasis) is prevalent, may be persistent and disabling for the sufferers and associated with high societal costs. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a new third-wave behavioral cognitive therapy that has not yet been tested in health anxiety. 34 consecutive Danish patients with severe health anxiety were referred from general practitioners or hospital departments and received a ten-session ACT group therapy. Patients were followed up by questionnaires for 6 months. There were significant reductions in health anxiety, somatic symptoms and emotional distress at 6 months compared to baseline: a 49% reduction in health anxiety (Whiteley-7 Index), a 47% decrease in emotional distress (SCL-8), and a 40% decrease in somatic symptoms (SCL-90R Somatization Subscale). The patients' emotional representations and perception of the consequences of their illness (IPQ) improved significantly, and 87% of the patients were very or extremely satisfied with the treatment.
PubMed ID
23871841 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy preceded by an experimental Attention Bias Modification procedure in recurrent depression: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299363
Source
Trials. 2018 Mar 27; 19(1):203
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Date
Mar-27-2018
Author
Tom Østergaard
Tobias Lundgren
Robert Zettle
Rune Jonassen
Catherine J Harmer
Tore C Stiles
Nils Inge Landrø
Vegard Øksendal Haaland
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Sørlandet Hospital, Arendal, Norway. tom.ostergaard@sshf.no.
Source
Trials. 2018 Mar 27; 19(1):203
Date
Mar-27-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Keywords
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attentional Bias
Depression - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Norway
Psychotherapy, Group
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Recurrence
Remission Induction
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
This project studies the effect of group-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) following Attention Bias Modification (ABM) on residual symptoms in recurrent depression. ACT is a cognitive-behavioral intervention combining acceptance and mindfulness processes with commitment and behavior-change processes. ACT enjoys modest empirical support in treating depression and has also shown promising results in secondary prevention of depression. The experimental cognitive bias modification (ABM) procedure has been shown to reduce surrogate markers of depression vulnerability in patients in remission from depression. The aim of the current project is to investigate if the effect of group-based ACT on reducing residual depressive symptoms can be enhanced by preceding it with ABM. Also, assessment of the relationship between conceptually relevant therapeutic processes and outcome will be investigated.
An invitation to participate in this project was extended to 120 individuals within a larger sample who had just completed a separate randomized, multisite, clinical trial (referred to hereafter as Phase 1) in which they received either ABM (n = 60) or a control condition without bias modification (n = 60). This larger Phase-1 sample consisted of 220 persons with a history of at least two episodes of major depression who were currently in remission or not fulfilling the criteria of major depression. After its inclusion, Phase-1 participants from the Sørlandet site (n = 120) were also recruited for this study in which they received an 8-week group-based ACT intervention. Measures will be taken immediately after Phase 1, 1 month, 2 months, 6 months, and 1 year after the conclusion of Phase 1.
This study sequentially combines acceptable, nondrug interventions from neuropsychology and cognitive-behavioral psychology in treating residual symptoms in depression. The results will provide information about the effectiveness of treatment and on mechanisms and processes of change that may be valuable in understanding and further developing ABM and ACT, combined and alone.
ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT02648165 . Registered on 6 January 2016.
PubMed ID
29587807 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Scand Audiol Suppl. 1978;(Suppl 8):242-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
I. Tuxen
Source
Scand Audiol Suppl. 1978;(Suppl 8):242-8
Date
1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Counseling
Denmark
Hearing Disorders - psychology
Humans
Psychotherapy, Group
Social Adjustment
PubMed ID
299114 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Addiction treatment center at Ulleråker Hospital 2. Rehabilitation of drug addicts].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110227
Source
Lakartidningen. 1969 Feb 12;66(7):673-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-12-1969
Author
K. Gadd
Source
Lakartidningen. 1969 Feb 12;66(7):673-6
Date
Feb-12-1969
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Physical Therapy Modalities
Psychotherapy, Group
Substance-Related Disorders - rehabilitation
Sweden
PubMed ID
5768960 View in PubMed
Less detail

"After all the traumas my body has been through, I feel good that it is still working."--Basic Body Awareness Therapy for traumatised refugees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270470
Source
Torture. 2015;25(1):33-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Kajsa Stade
Signe Skammeritz
Charlotte Hjortkjær
Jessica Carlsson
Source
Torture. 2015;25(1):33-50
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awareness
Denmark - epidemiology
Emotions
Ethnic Groups
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Therapy Modalities
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Quality of Life - psychology
Refugees - psychology
Retrospective Studies
Stress, Psychological - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Basic Body Awareness Therapy (BBAT) is a form of physiotherapy that is often used for psychiatric patients in Scandinavian countries. To our knowledge there has not been any studies investigating BBAT as a treatment for traumatised refugees until now.
To explore the compliance, acceptability and treatment satisfaction using group BBAT in traumatised refugees. To study changes in psychiatric and somatic symptoms as well as quality of life, level of functioning and quality of movement during treatment with BBAT.
All Arabic speaking patients that previously had received treatment at the Competence Centre for Transcultural Psychiatry in Copenhagen from April 2008 to June 2009 were invited to participate (N=29). Nine persons were included in a male (N=4) and female (N=5) group. All participants were traumatised refugees. The BBAT treatment consisted of 14 sessions over a period of 14 weeks. Before and after treatment the participants were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. The interviews were transcribed and analysed with a thematic approach. The participants also filled out self-administrated questionnaires and two physiotherapists tested the participants' movement harmony using the Body Awareness Rating Scale-Movement Harmony (BARS-MH) test. At the end of the study, the participants filled out anonymous questionnaires about treatment satisfaction.
The results showed that the participants had a high compliance, acceptability and treatment satisfaction with BBAT. The majority of participants showed improvements in symptoms from baseline to post-intervention on the self-administrated questionnaires and in the BARS-MH test.
Further research is needed to expand the scientific knowledge regarding the use of BBAT in traumatised refugees. If future research can confirm our positive findings it will have a considerable impact on future treatment designs and for the individual patient.
PubMed ID
26021346 View in PubMed
Less detail

Agency orientation and chronic musculoskeletal pain: effects of a group learning program based on the personal construct theory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72029
Source
Clin J Pain. 2000 Dec;16(4):281-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
L. Haugli
E. Steen
E. Laerum
A. Finset
R. Nygaard
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice, University of Oslo, Norway. liv.haugli@samfunnsmed.uio.no
Source
Clin J Pain. 2000 Dec;16(4):281-9
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - psychology - rehabilitation - therapy
Pain - psychology - rehabilitation - therapy
Patient Education - organization & administration
Patient satisfaction
Power (Psychology)
Program Evaluation
Psychological Theory
Psychotherapy, Group - organization & administration
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the effects of a group learning program on patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain and high absenteeism and investigates what characterizes those patients who may benefit from such a program. The learning program was based on personal construct theory. The theory included the following: (1) participation in an educational program is related to a favorable outcome across the outcome measures (pain, pain coping, management of daily life, absenteeism, and use of health care), (2) patients with high agency orientation (i.e., inner-directed) cope with their pain and manage daily life in a better manner than do patients with low agency orientation (i.e., outer-directed), and (3) patients with high personal control, measured in terms of agency orientation, in terms of health locus of control, or in both terms, will benefit more from the educational program than will patients with low personal control. DESIGN: The study was a randomized controlled study. PATIENTS: One hundred and sixteen patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain and high absenteeism answered a questionnaire before and after the intervention program. The intervention group (n = 61) consisted of nine subgroups geographically spread through the eastern part of Norway and met for four hours every 2 weeks from February 1997 to October 1997. A total of 12 meetings were held. RESULTS: The intervention group reported a significantly higher score for the variable "management of everyday life" (p
PubMed ID
11153782 View in PubMed
Less detail

238 records – page 1 of 24.