Skip header and navigation

Refine By

945 records – page 1 of 95.

1-year retention and social function after buprenorphine-assisted relapse prevention treatment for heroin dependence in Sweden: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186500
Source
Lancet. 2003 Feb 22;361(9358):662-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-2003
Author
Johan Kakko
Kerstin Dybrandt Svanborg
Mary Jeanne Kreek
Markus Heilig
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, Neurotec, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, S-141 86, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Lancet. 2003 Feb 22;361(9358):662-8
Date
Feb-22-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Buprenorphine - therapeutic use
Counseling
Female
Heroin Dependence - classification - drug therapy - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Narcotic Antagonists - therapeutic use
Psychotherapy, Group
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The partial opiate-receptor agonist buprenorphine has been suggested for treatment of heroin dependence, but there are few long-term and placebo-controlled studies of its effectiveness. We aimed to assess the 1-year efficacy of buprenorphine in combination with intensive psychosocial therapy for treatment of heroin dependence.
40 individuals aged older than 20 years, who met DSM-IV criteria for opiate dependence for at least 1 year, but did not fulfil Swedish legal criteria for methadone maintenance treatment were randomly allocated either to daily buprenorphine (fixed dose 16 mg sublingually for 12 months; supervised daily administration for a least 6 months, possible take-home doses thereafter) or a tapered 6 day regimen of buprenorphine, thereafter followed by placebo. All patients participated in cognitive-behavioural group therapy to prevent relapse, received weekly individual counselling sessions, and submitted thrice weekly supervised urine samples for analysis to detect illicit drug use. Our primary endpoint was 1-year retention in treatment and analysis was by intention to treat.
1-year retention in treatment was 75% and 0% in the buprenorphine and placebo groups, respectively (p=0.0001; risk ratio 58.7 [95% CI 7.4-467.4]). Urine screens were about 75% negative for illicit opiates, central stimulants, cannabinoids, and benzodiazepines in the patients remaining in treatment.
The combination of buprenorphine and intensive psychosocial treatment is safe and highly efficacious, and should be added to the treatment options available for individuals who are dependent on heroin.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2003 May 31;361(9372):1907; author reply 1907-812788596
Comment In: Lancet. 2003 Feb 22;361(9358):634-512606172
Comment In: Lancet. 2003 May 31;361(9372):1906-7; author reply 1907-812788595
PubMed ID
12606177 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 2-year follow-up of involuntary admission's influence upon adherence and outcome in first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145997
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
S. Opjordsmoen
S. Friis
I. Melle
U. Haahr
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
J I Røssberg
B R Rund
E. Simonsen
P. Vaglum
T H McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål and Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway. o.s.e.ilner@medisin.uio.no
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To see, if voluntary admission for treatment in first-episode psychosis results in better adherence to treatment and more favourable outcome than involuntary admission.
We compared consecutively first-admitted, hospitalised patients from a voluntary (n = 91) with an involuntary (n = 126) group as to psychopathology and functioning using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning Scales at baseline, after 3 months and at 2 year follow-up. Moreover, duration of supportive psychotherapy, medication and number of hospitalisations during the 2 years were measured.
More women than men were admitted involuntarily. Voluntary patients had less psychopathology and better functioning than involuntary patients at baseline. No significant difference as to duration of psychotherapy and medication between groups was found. No significant difference was found as to psychopathology and functioning between voluntarily and involuntarily admitted patients at follow-up.
Legal admission status per se did not seem to influence treatment adherence and outcome.
PubMed ID
20085554 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 2-year follow-up study of people with severe mental illness involved in psychosocial rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257843
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Petra Svedberg
Bengt Svensson
Lars Hansson
Henrika Jormfeldt
Author Affiliation
Petra Svedberg, Associate Professor, School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University , Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Prospective Studies
Psychotherapy - methods
Quality of Life
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUNDS. A focus on psychiatric rehabilitation in order to support recovery among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) has been given great attention in research and mental health policy, but less impact on clinical practice. Despite the potential impact of psychiatric rehabilitation on health and wellbeing, there is a lack of research regarding the model called the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach from Boston University (BPR).
The aim was to investigate the outcome of the BPR intervention regarding changes in life situation, use of healthcare services, quality of life, health, psychosocial functioning and empowerment.
The study has a prospective longitudinal design and the setting was seven mental health services who worked with the BPR in the county of Halland in Sweden. In total, 71 clients completed the assessment at baseline and of these 49 completed the 2-year follow-up assessments.
The most significant finding was an improved psychosocial functioning at the follow-up assessment. Furthermore, 65% of the clients reported that they had mainly or almost completely achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals at the 2-year follow-up. There were significant differences with regard to health, empowerment, quality of life and psychosocial functioning for those who reported that they had mainly/completely had achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals compared to those who reported that they only had to a small extent or not at all reached their goals.
Our results indicate that the BPR approach has impact on clients' health, empowerment, quality of life and in particular concerning psychosocial functioning.
PubMed ID
24228778 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A case of sexual abuse with several victims in a small municipality. A cooperation project between health services]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34559
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Nov 30;116(29):3506-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-1996
Author
M. Horneland
A M Hanstad
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk poliklinikk adveling Stavanger Rogaland psykiatriske sjukehus, Hillevåg, Stavanger.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Nov 30;116(29):3506-8
Date
Nov-30-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - therapy
Community Health Services
English Abstract
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Psychotherapy, Group
Social Support
Abstract
This article describes the management of an extensive case of sexual abuse in a small Norwegian community. The victims were adult men who had been exploited in childhood and adolescence by the same abuser. A demand for support was addressed to the health services when these men realised as adults that they shared this experience. The community health service and the psychiatric department decided to arrange psycho-educative meetings in the community centre. Victims, their families and local professional helpers were invited. The meetings gave general information about sexual abuse, early and late symptoms and the treatment facilities available locally. In one facility a psychiatrist and a general practitioner led a treatment group together. Five of the victims took part in this group. Fortunately, this case never reached the public press. Cooperation between specialist and community health services in managing such cases is regarded as essential.
PubMed ID
9019860 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptance and commitment group therapy for health anxiety--results from a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108574
Source
J Anxiety Disord. 2013 Jun;27(5):461-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
T. Eilenberg
L. Kronstrand
P. Fink
L. Frostholm
Author Affiliation
The Research Clinic for Functional Disorders and Psychosomatics, Aarhus University Hospital, Barthsgade 5.1, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.
Source
J Anxiety Disord. 2013 Jun;27(5):461-8
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypochondriasis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Questionnaires
Abstract
Health anxiety (or hypochondriasis) is prevalent, may be persistent and disabling for the sufferers and associated with high societal costs. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a new third-wave behavioral cognitive therapy that has not yet been tested in health anxiety. 34 consecutive Danish patients with severe health anxiety were referred from general practitioners or hospital departments and received a ten-session ACT group therapy. Patients were followed up by questionnaires for 6 months. There were significant reductions in health anxiety, somatic symptoms and emotional distress at 6 months compared to baseline: a 49% reduction in health anxiety (Whiteley-7 Index), a 47% decrease in emotional distress (SCL-8), and a 40% decrease in somatic symptoms (SCL-90R Somatization Subscale). The patients' emotional representations and perception of the consequences of their illness (IPQ) improved significantly, and 87% of the patients were very or extremely satisfied with the treatment.
PubMed ID
23871841 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Scand Audiol Suppl. 1978;(Suppl 8):242-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
I. Tuxen
Source
Scand Audiol Suppl. 1978;(Suppl 8):242-8
Date
1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Counseling
Denmark
Hearing Disorders - psychology
Humans
Psychotherapy, Group
Social Adjustment
PubMed ID
299114 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active multimodal psychotherapy in children and adolescents with suicidality: description, evaluation and clinical profile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92095
Source
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;13(3):435-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Högberg Goran
Hällström Tore
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. gor.hogberg@gmail.com
Source
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;13(3):435-48
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Ambulatory Care Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Child
Combined Modality Therapy
Desensitization, Psychologic - methods
Eye Movements - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Program Evaluation - methods
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychodrama - methods
Psychotherapy - methods
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate the clinical pattern of 14 youths with presenting suicidality, to describe an integrative treatment approach, and to estimate therapy effectiveness. Fourteen patients aged 10 to 18 years from a child and adolescent outpatient clinic in Stockholm were followed in a case series. The patients were treated with active multimodal psychotherapy. This consisted of mood charting by mood-maps, psycho-education, wellbeing practice and trauma resolution. Active techniques were psychodrama and body-mind focused techniques including eye movement desensitization and reprocessing. The patients were assessed before treatment, immediately after treatment and at 22 months post treatment with the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. The clinical pattern of the group was observed. After treatment there was a significant change towards normality in the Global Assessment of Functioning scale both immediately post-treatment and at 22 months. A clinical pattern, post trauma suicidal reaction, was observed with a combination of suicidality, insomnia, bodily symptoms and disturbed mood regulation. We conclude that in the post trauma reaction suicidality might be a presenting symptom in young people. Despite the shortcomings of a case series the results of this study suggest that a mood-map-based multimodal treatment approach with active techniques might be of value in the treatment of children and youth with suicidality.
PubMed ID
18783125 View in PubMed
Less detail

Activities of counsellors in a hospice/palliative care environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191781
Source
J Palliat Care. 2001;17(4):229-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
M. Thompson
C. Rose
W. Wainwright
L. Mattar
M. Scanlan
Author Affiliation
Victoria Hospice Society, Royal Jubilee Hospital, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2001;17(4):229-35
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Hospices
Humans
Male
Palliative Care - methods
Professional-Family Relations
Psychotherapy - methods
Social Support
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
This study examined activities related to the provision of psychosocial care by counsellors in the hospice/palliative care setting. A qualitative design using written reports was used in an urban Canadian hospice/palliative care program. A convenient sample of 13 counsellors indicated the activities they typically performed in their work with patients and families. Thematic analysis of the activities directly related to patient and family care was performed and then validated by presenting these activities back to the counsellors in a group setting. Seven themes resulted: 1) companioning; 2) psychosocial assessment, planning, and evaluation; 3) counselling interventions; 4) facilitation and advocacy; 5) patient and family education; 6) consultation and reporting; and 7) team support. These thematic findings confirmed those of previous studies and also highlighted two additional findings. Team support was seen as an activity that directly affected client care, and there was a strong emphasis on the activity of companioning the dying and their families. Also discussed are implications of these results, as well as suggestions for further research.
PubMed ID
11813339 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Int J Psychosom. 1994;41(1-4):87-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
A. Zinchenko
Author Affiliation
Saybrook Institute, San Francisco, CA 94133.
Source
Int J Psychosom. 1994;41(1-4):87-92
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arousal
Behavior, Addictive - psychology - rehabilitation
Breathing Exercises
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Humans
Internal-External Control
Psychotherapy
Russia
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
PubMed ID
7843873 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addiction: its nature, spread and treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68189
Source
Isr Ann Psychiatr Relat Discip. 1971 Aug;9(2):155-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1971

945 records – page 1 of 95.