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The teaching of psychotherapy in Canadian psychiatric residency programs: residents' perceptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239809
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Dec;29(8):658-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1984
Author
E L Pérez
L E Krul
R. Kapoor
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Dec;29(8):658-64
Date
Dec-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Family Therapy - education
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Psychotherapy - education
Psychotherapy, Group - education
Questionnaires
Teaching
Abstract
In order to determine the residents' perceptions toward their psychotherapy training, a questionnaire was distributed to 400 residents in the 16 Canadian psychiatric residency programs. The main areas studied were: the resident's demographic and educational characteristics; the residency program characteristics; the type of training available in different psychotherapeutic modalities; the analysis of quality and quantity of attention given to different elements of psychotherapy supervision (patient assessment, diagnostic formulation of treatment approach and goals); the degree of importance attributed by the residents to the above mentioned elements of psychotherapy supervision; and the residents' perception of their supervisor's attributes (examples: teaching ability and rapport). Forty-two percent of the residents completed the questionnaire. Residents mentioned that the most adequate supervision was for long-term individual psychotherapy cases and that behavioral and group therapy supervision was the least adequate. The three most essential qualities in a supervisor's profile were judged to be: capacity for the development of a good rapport with the trainee; ability to pinpoint residents' psychotherapy shortcomings and his willingness to help residents to overcome them; ability to teach. Three factors that significantly influenced the trainees perception of their psychotherapy training were: resident's age, a seminar in individual psychotherapy in the residency core program; having received more than one hour weekly of psychotherapy supervision. The understanding of patient's psychodynamics was the most adequately taught element during psychotherapy supervision.
PubMed ID
6518438 View in PubMed
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Seeing future success: does imagery perspective influence achievement motivation?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160854
Source
Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2007 Oct;33(10):1392-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Noelia A Vasquez
Roger Buehler
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, Canada. noeliav@yorku.ca
Source
Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2007 Oct;33(10):1392-405
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adult
Canada
Female
Humans
Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Male
Motivation
Questionnaires
Students - psychology
Universities
Abstract
Imagining future success can sometimes enhance people's motivation to achieve it. This article examines a phenomenological aspect of positive mental imagery--the visual perspective adopted--that may moderate its motivational impact. The authors hypothesize that people feel more motivated to succeed on a future task when they visualize its successful completion from a third-person rather than a first-person perspective. Actions viewed from the third-person perspective are generally construed at a relatively high level of abstraction--in a manner that highlights their larger meaning and significance--which should heighten their motivational impact. Three studies in the domain of academic motivation support this reasoning. Students experience a greater increase in achievement motivation when they imagine their successful task completion from a third-rather than a first-person perspective. Moreover, mediational analyses reveal that third-person imagery boosts motivation by prompting students to construe their success abstractly and to perceive it as important.
PubMed ID
17933735 View in PubMed
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Starting up or starting over: the role of intentions to increase and maintain the behavior of exercise initiates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156026
Source
J Sport Exerc Psychol. 2008 Jun;30(3):285-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Marcia I Milne
Wendy M Rodgers
Craig R Hall
Philip M Wilson
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON Canada.
Source
J Sport Exerc Psychol. 2008 Jun;30(3):285-301
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Exercise - psychology
Female
Humans
Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Intention
Male
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
Across various social cognitive theories, behavioral intention is broadly argued to be the most proximal and important predictor of behavior (Ajzen, 1991; Gibbons, Gerrard, Blanton, & Russell, 1998; Rogers, 1983). It seems probable that an intention to increase behavior might be differentially determined from an intention to maintain behavior. Thus, the purpose of the current study was to examine (1) the change in two types of behavioral intention over time and (2) the relationship between intention and the social-cognitive factor mental imagery. Behavioral intention, exercise imagery, and observed exercise behavior was measured in 68 exercise initiates participating in a 12-week exercise program. Results revealed that behavioral intention to increase exercise behavior decreased over the exercise program, whereas intentions to maintain exercise behavior increased. Appearance and technique imagery were found to be significant predictors of intention to increase behavior during the first 6 weeks of the program, and only appearance imagery predicted intention to maintain exercise behavior during the last 6 weeks. These findings suggest that the two types of behavioral intention are distinguishable and may be useful targets for exercise behavior interventions.
PubMed ID
18648107 View in PubMed
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Therapists' professional and personal characteristics as predictors of working alliance in short-term and long-term psychotherapies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265503
Source
Clin Psychol Psychother. 2014 Nov-Dec;21(6):475-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
Erkki Heinonen
Olavi Lindfors
Tommi Härkänen
Esa Virtala
Tuija Jääskeläinen
Paul Knekt
Source
Clin Psychol Psychother. 2014 Nov-Dec;21(6):475-94
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - therapy
Clinical Competence - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Depressive Disorder - therapy
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Personality
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychotherapy - methods
Psychotherapy, Brief - methods
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the determinants of the therapeutic working relationship and better understand its intrapersonal and interpersonal nature, this study investigated therapist characteristics as predictors of the formation and development of patient-rated and therapist-rated working alliances within a clinical trial of short-term versus long-term therapies. Short-term (solution-focused and short-term psychodynamic) and long-term (long-term psychodynamic therapy and psychoanalysis) therapies were provided by 70 volunteering, experienced therapists to 333 patients suffering from depressive and/or anxiety disorders. Therapists' professional and personal characteristics, measured prior to the start of the treatments, were assessed with the comprehensive self-report instrument, Development of Psychotherapists Common Core Questionnaire. The Working Alliance Inventory was rated by both therapists and patients at the third session and at the 7?months' follow-up point from the initiation of therapy. Therapists' self-rated basic interpersonal skills were found to predict the formation of better patient-rated alliances in both short-term and long-term therapies. Engaging, encouraging relational style fostered improvement of patients' working alliances especially in the course of short-term therapies. However, it led to patient alliance deterioration in long-term therapies, where constructive coping techniques proved more beneficial. Therapists' professional self-confidence and work enjoyment, along with their self-experiences in personal life, consistently predicted their alliances, but were less salient for patient ratings of alliance. The divergence of therapist and patient viewpoints has implications for therapist training and supervision, as characteristics found detrimental or helpful for the working relationship rated from the perspective of one party may not be predictive of the other therapy participant's experience.
PubMed ID
23813617 View in PubMed
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A survey of Canadian group psychotherapy association members' perceptions of psychotherapy research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144797
Source
Int J Group Psychother. 2010 Apr;60(2):159-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
John S Ogrodniczuk
William E Piper
Anthony S Joyce
Mark A Lau
Ingrid Sochting
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry at the University of British Columbia, BC, Canada. ogrodnic@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Int J Group Psychother. 2010 Apr;60(2):159-76
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Biomedical research
Canada
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Health Associations
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Questionnaires
Abstract
The present study reports on the findings of a Canadian survey of group therapists. The survey was conducted to solicit their perspectives of psychotherapy research. The goal of the survey was to identify topics and issues that were important to group therapists. Findings from the survey suggest that group therapists are interested in research, perhaps more than one might expect. However, respondents identified a number of factors that limit the appeal of research or impede the integration of research findings into practice. Several suggestions were offered for future research and for methods of communicating the findings of research to clinicians. The survey findings call for improved communication and collaboration between researchers and clinicians in order to achieve a more meaningful integration of science and practice in the group therapy field.
PubMed ID
20297879 View in PubMed
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[The postgraduate training of general practitioners in communication and counseling. A questionnaire survey in the county of Aarhus].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191143
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Feb 11;164(7):895-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-11-2002
Author
Jette Møller Nielsen
Peter Vedsted
Frede Olesen
Author Affiliation
Forskningsenheden for Almen Medicin, Aarhus Universitet, Vennelyst Boulevard 6, DK-8000 Arhus C. jmn@alm.au.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Feb 11;164(7):895-9
Date
Feb-11-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Counseling - education
Denmark
Education, Medical, Continuing
Education, Medical, Graduate
Humans
Physicians, Family - education
Psychiatry - education
Psychotherapy - education
Questionnaires
Abstract
The study aimed to describe the postgraduate training of the general practitioners (GPs) in communication and psychiatric counselling.
GPs in Aarhus County, Denmark, received a mailed questionnaire about psychiatric hospital training, participation in courses and Balint groups (psychiatric supervision), and their need for further training.
The questionnaire was returned by 320 (74.4%) GPs. Almost all GPs had received some kind of postgraduate training although to a very varying extent. Almost half had taken courses of more than three days' duration, and half were members of a psychiatric supervision group. Two-thirds of the GPs thought they needed further training. The need was independent of the GP's evaluation of his/her own psychiatric education.
PubMed ID
11881553 View in PubMed
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A survey of psychotherapy training in Canadian psychiatry residency programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106358
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2013 Nov;37(6):431-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013

A national survey of Canadian psychiatry residents' perceptions of psychotherapy training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157828
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2007 Nov;52(11):710-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
George Hadjipavlou
John S Ogrodniczuk
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2007 Nov;52(11):710-7
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Education
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatry - education
Psychotherapy - education
Questionnaires
Abstract
To explore Canadian psychiatry residents' perceptions of their psychotherapy training and identify factors that may influence decisions to practise psychotherapy after graduation.
We surveyed psychiatry residents at all training sites across Canada, using a self-report questionnaire.
The response rate was 63%. Of the respondents, 68% indicated that the prospect of learning and practising psychotherapy was a factor in their decisions to become psychiatrists, and 87% considered their ability to practise psychotherapy to be important to their identities as psychiatrists. The majority of residents (71%) were generally satisfied with their psychotherapy training. Among the graduating class of residents, 84% anticipate practising psychotherapy in some capacity. Satisfaction with their overall training experience and supervision and feeling competent to perform psychotherapy were significantly associated with their decisions to practise psychotherapy after graduation.
Most psychiatry residents currently enrolled in postgraduate training programs across Canada view psychotherapy as having an important role in the way they anticipate practising psychiatry.
PubMed ID
18399038 View in PubMed
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[Give your opinion about St. Hans hospital. A study of patient satisfaction in a psychiatric hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234702
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Sep 14;149(38):2555-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-14-1987

[Focus group interview. A method of study and implementation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194255
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jun 4;163(23):3227-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-4-2001
Author
A M Svendsen
M E Lau
Author Affiliation
Afdeling V, Stolpegård, Amtssygehuset i Gentofte.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jun 4;163(23):3227-30
Date
Jun-4-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Denmark
Focus Groups - methods - standards
Humans
Milieu Therapy - standards
Patient satisfaction
Psychotherapy, Group - standards
Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this article is to present the qualitative focus group interview as a useful method of evaluating psycho- and milieu therapeutic treatment.
We conducted two focus group interviews with former inpatients of a psychiatric ward specialising in group therapy. To enhance the quality of the data by triangulation, the staff, representing both milieu- and psychotherapists, were also interviewed.
Analysis of the results revealed the following dominant themes: The continuation of the treatment was jeopardised by the existence of a welcome group. There was a need for further information as soon as the patient came into contact with the hospital. Moreover, an earlier and increased involvement of the family was required. After their own interview, the staff participated in deciding which results should lead to alterations in treatment procedures, thereby becoming involved in implementing the results.
The focus group interview is a valuable method of evaluating psycho- and milieu therapeutic treatment. Interviewing the staff served as triangulation and eased the implementation of the results remarkably.
PubMed ID
11421190 View in PubMed
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94 records – page 1 of 10.