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87 records – page 1 of 9.

[Therapeutic methods and results in child and adolescent psychiatry].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252625
Source
Duodecim. 1975;91(21):1312-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975
Source
Sairaanh Vuosik. 1966-1967;4:108-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
O. Nevalainen
Source
Sairaanh Vuosik. 1966-1967;4:108-40
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - therapy
Finland
Humans
Nursing
Psychotherapy, Group
PubMed ID
5181992 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Sairaanh Vuosik. 1966-1967;4:108-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966-1967
Author
Nevalainen O
Source
Sairaanh Vuosik. 1966-1967;4:108-40
Date
1966-1967
Language
Finnish
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism/therapy
Finland
Humans
Nursing
Psychotherapy, Group
Less detail

[Schizophrenia Project in Abo. Psychotherapy-oriented broad-based mental health care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221971
Source
Nord Med. 1993;108(5):136-8, 147
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
Y O Alanen
Source
Nord Med. 1993;108(5):136-8, 147
Date
1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Deinstitutionalization
Family Therapy
Finland
Humans
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Psychotherapy - methods
Psychotherapy, Group
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Schizophrenia - therapy
Abstract
The concept of need-related care for schizophrenia patients, evolved in Abo during the 1980s, consists in a flexible form of psychotherapy oriented care, which in its planning and execution is tailored to meet varying individual needs. It is based both on family and individual therapy and therapeutic groups, drugs being used as support. The results have been promising and it has been possible to reduce hospitalisation.
Notes
Comment In: Nord Med. 1993;108(12):326-7, 3298272396
PubMed ID
8497402 View in PubMed
Less detail

The outcome of short- and long-term psychotherapy 10 years after start of treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278133
Source
Psychol Med. 2016 Apr;46(6):1175-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
P. Knekt
E. Virtala
T. Härkänen
M. Vaarama
J. Lehtonen
O. Lindfors
Source
Psychol Med. 2016 Apr;46(6):1175-88
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mood Disorders - therapy
Outpatients - psychology
Personality
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy, Brief - methods
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Psychotherapy, Psychodynamic - methods
Remission Induction
Social Adjustment
Treatment Outcome
Work Capacity Evaluation
Young Adult
Abstract
Empirical evidence on whether patients' mental health and functioning will be more improved after long-term than short-term therapy is scarce. We addressed this question in a clinical trial with a long follow-up.
In the Helsinki Psychotherapy Study, 326 out-patients with mood or anxiety disorder were randomly assigned to long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (LPP), short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (SPP) or solution-focused therapy (SFT) and were followed for 10 years. The outcome measures were psychiatric symptoms, work ability, personality and social functioning, need for treatment, and remission.
At the end of the follow-up, altogether 74% of the patients were free from clinically elevated psychiatric symptoms. Compared with SPP, LPP showed greater reductions in symptoms, greater improvement in work ability and higher remission rates. A similar difference in symptoms and work ability was observed in comparison with SFT after adjustment for violations of treatment standards. No notable differences in effectiveness between SFT and SPP were observed. The prevalence of auxiliary treatment was relatively high, 47% in SFT, 58% in SPP and 33% in LPP, and, accordingly, the remission rates for general symptoms were 55, 45 and 62%, respectively.
After 10 years of follow-up, the benefits of LPP in comparison with the short-term therapies are rather small, though significant in symptoms and work ability, possibly due to more frequent use of auxiliary therapy in the short-term therapy groups. Further studies should focus on the choice of optimal length of therapy and the selection of factors predicting outcome of short- v. long-term therapy.
PubMed ID
26755201 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Online therapies - what is known about their functionality].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268160
Source
Duodecim. 2015;131(13-14):1297-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jan-Henry Stenberg
Kaisla Joutsenniemi
Matti Holi
Source
Duodecim. 2015;131(13-14):1297-301
Date
2015
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Depression - therapy
Finland
Humans
Internet
Motivation
Psychotherapy - methods
Telemedicine
Abstract
Online therapies are partly automated therapies, in which psychotherapeutic contents have been complemented with computer-aided presentational and educational contents, with a therapist giving support to the progress of the patient. As methods, these therapeutic programs incorporate therapeutic methods that have proven effective, such as remodeling of thoughts, activation of behavior and exposure, empathy, strengthening of cooperative relationship and motivation, and general support for self-reflection. For instance, online therapies already constitute part of the Finnish treatment guidelines on depression. Online therapies are available throughout Finland for the essential psychiatric illnesses.
PubMed ID
26536726 View in PubMed
Less detail

Psychotherapy effectiveness for major depression: a randomized trial in a Finnish community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278030
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2016 May 06;16:131
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-06-2016
Author
Hannu P Saloheimo
John Markowitz
Tuija H Saloheimo
Jarmo J Laitinen
Jari Sundell
Matti O Huttunen
Timo A Aro
Tuitu N Mikkonen
Heikki O Katila
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2016 May 06;16:131
Date
May-06-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Depression - therapy
Depressive Disorder, Major - psychology - therapy
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychotherapy - methods
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to assess the relative effectiveness of Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT), Psychoeducative Group Therapy (PeGT), and treatment as usual (TAU) for patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in municipal psychiatric secondary care in one Finnish region.
All adult patients (N?=?1515) with MDD symptoms referred to secondary care in 2004-2006 were screened. Eligible, consenting patients were assigned randomly to 10-week IPT (N?=?46), PeGT (N?=?42), or TAU (N?=?46) treatment arms. Antidepressant pharmacotherapy among study participants was evaluated. The Hamilton Depression Rating scale (HAM-D) was the primary outcome measure. Assessment occurred at 1, 5, 3, 6, and 12 months. Actual amount of therapists' labor was also evaluated. All statistical analyses were performed with R software.
All three treatment cells showed marked improvement at 12-month follow-up. At 3 months, 42 % in IPT, 61 % in PeGT, and 42 % in TAU showed a mean =50 % in HAM-D improvement; after 12 months, these values were 61 %, 76 %, and 68 %. Concomitant medication and limited sample size minimized between-treatment differences. Statistically significant differences emerged only between PeGT and TAU favoring PeGT. Secondary outcome measures (CGI-s and SOFAS) showed parallel results.
All three treatments notably benefited highly comorbid MDD patients in a public sector secondary care unit.
ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02314767 (09.12.2014).
Notes
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Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2009 Mar;70(3):354-6119192474
PubMed ID
27153942 View in PubMed
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[The epicrisis of therapists--a method for improvement of open psychiatric care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247329
Source
Nord Med. 1979 Apr;94(4):113-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1979
Source
Int J Group Psychother. 2015 Oct;65(4):535-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Ulrika Segercrantz
Source
Int J Group Psychother. 2015 Oct;65(4):535-41
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Psychotherapy, Group - education - history - trends
Abstract
This article describes the development of group psychotherapy in Finland as a treatment in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. Different theoretical preferences split the training programs into two; both are now trying to survive in a psychotherapeutically changing landscape. All training programs have been transferred to the universities, but a lack of interest in, and knowledge about, group psychotherapy has resulted in fewer students choosing this program. This may result, in the future, in even less knowledge of, and research in, group dynamics in Finland.
PubMed ID
26401796 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Current status of psychotherapy in Finland].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239364
Source
Duodecim. 1985;101(17):1725-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985

87 records – page 1 of 9.