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156 records – page 1 of 16.

Patient satisfaction in a Psychiatric Walk-In Clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242226
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1983 Feb;28(1):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1983
Author
R J Dyck
H F Azim
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1983 Feb;28(1):30-3
Date
Feb-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjustment Disorders - therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Ambulatory Care
Child
Child, Preschool
Consumer Satisfaction
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Neurotic Disorders - therapy
Psychotherapy
Psychotherapy, Group
Abstract
The present study examined consumer satisfaction with services provided in a Psychiatric Walk-In Clinic in order to determine not only general levels of satisfaction but also whether or not differences in satisfaction exist between different user groups. Although levels of reported satisfaction were generally high, group psychotherapy patients reported being significantly less satisfied than patients who had been assessed at the clinic or who were in individual psychotherapy. None of the demographic variables including previous psychiatric experience, diagnosis and patient visits were related to satisfaction. These data were discussed in terms of program development.
PubMed ID
6839265 View in PubMed
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Patient personality and time-limited group psychotherapy for complicated grief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193089
Source
Int J Group Psychother. 2001 Oct;51(4):525-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
W E Piper
M. McCallum
A S Joyce
J S Rosie
J S Ogrodniczuk
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia.
Source
Int J Group Psychother. 2001 Oct;51(4):525-52
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjustment Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Analysis of Variance
Female
Grief
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Personality
Psychotherapy, Brief - methods
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Regression Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We used a randomized clinical trial to investigate the interaction of two patient personality characteristics (quality of object relations [QOR] and psychological mindedness [PM]) with two forms of time-limited, short-term group therapy (interpretive and supportive) for 139 psychiatric outpatients with complicated grief. Findings differed depending on the outcome variable (e.g., grief symptoms, general symptoms) and the statistical criterion (e.g., statistical significance, clinical significance, magnitude of effect). Patients in both therapies improved. For grief symptoms, a significant interaction effect was found for QOR. High-QOR patients improved more in interpretive therapy and low-QOR patients improved more in supportive therapy. A main effect was found for PM. High-PM patients improved more in both therapies. For general symptoms, clinical significance favored interpretive therapy over supportive therapy. Clinical implications concerning patient-treatment matching are discussed.
PubMed ID
11582899 View in PubMed
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The indigenous therapist in the black community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253018
Source
J Natl Med Assoc. 1974 Nov;66(6):511-3, 504
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1974
Author
F M Douglas
Source
J Natl Med Assoc. 1974 Nov;66(6):511-3, 504
Date
Nov-1974
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans
Aged
Female
Humans
Hypnosis
Physician-Patient Relations
Psychotherapy
PubMed ID
4436888 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Appl Ther. 1967 Mar;9(3):266-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1967

[Sanatorium treatment of duodenal ulcer patients over 50].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238437
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 1985 Sep;63(9):86-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1985

Psychometric analysis of the Swedish panic disorder severity scale and its self-report version.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300038
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2019 Jan; 73(1):58-63
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Martin Svensson
Thomas Nilsson
Håkan Johansson
Gardar Viborg
Sean Perrin
Rolf Sandell
Author Affiliation
a Department of Psychology , Lund University , Lund , SE , Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2019 Jan; 73(1):58-63
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Agoraphobia - classification - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Panic Disorder - classification - therapy
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics
Psychotherapy, Brief
Psychotherapy, Psychodynamic
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Translations
Abstract
Panic disorder, with or without agoraphobia (PDA or PD, respectively), is a major public health problem. After having established a PD diagnosis based on the DSM or the ICD systems, the Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) is the most widely used interview-based instrument for assessing disorder severity. There is also a self-report version of the instrument (PDSS-SR); both exist in a Swedish translation but their psychometric properties remain untested.
We studied 221 patients with PD/PDA recruited to a randomized controlled preference trial of cognitive-behavioral and brief panic-focused psychodynamic psychotherapy. In addition to PDSS and PDSS-SR the participants completed self-reports including the Clinical Outcome in Routine Evaluation - Outcome Measure, Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, Sheehan Disability Scale, Bodily Sensations Questionnaire and the Mobility Inventory for Agoraphobia.
PDSS and PDSS-SR possessed excellent psychometric properties (internal consistency, test-retest reliability) and convergent validity. A single factor structure for both versions was not confirmed. In terms of clinical utility, the PDSS had very high inter-rater reliability and correspondence with PD assessed via structured diagnostic interview. Both versions were sensitive to the effects of PD-focused treatment, although subjects scored systematically lower on the self-report version.
The study confirmed the reliability and validity of the Swedish versions of PDSS and PDSS-SR. Both versions were highly sensitive to the effects of two PD-focused treatments and can be used both in clinical and research settings. However, further investigation of the factor structures of both the PDSS and PDSS-SR is warranted.
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01606592.
PubMed ID
30636466 View in PubMed
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[Hypnosis as an aid in dental and psychotherapeutic treatment in psychiatric hospitals].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245813
Source
Tandlakartidningen. 1980 May 1;72(9):524-8, 531
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1980
Author
A. Frödin
Source
Tandlakartidningen. 1980 May 1;72(9):524-8, 531
Date
May-1-1980
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Dental Care
Female
Humans
Hypnosis
Hypnosis, Dental
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Psychotherapy
Sweden
PubMed ID
6944875 View in PubMed
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A controlled evaluation of reminiscence and current topics discussion groups in a nursing home context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229716
Source
Gerontologist. 1989 Dec;29(6):768-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989
Author
C. Rattenbury
M J Stones
Source
Gerontologist. 1989 Dec;29(6):768-71
Date
Dec-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affect
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Communication
Group Processes
Humans
Memory
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nursing Homes
Psychotherapy, Group
Abstract
In this randomized study, we compared the psychological well-being of elderly nursing home residents who participated in reminiscence and current topics group discussions with a control group of residents. We rated participants happiness/depression, activity, mood, and functional levels before and after the group interventions. The intervention had a significant effect only on the happiness/depression measure, with both intervention groups showing positive changes compared to the control group.
PubMed ID
2620839 View in PubMed
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A stepped care stress management intervention on cancer-related traumatic stress symptoms among breast cancer patients—a randomized study in group vs. individual setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278780
Source
Psychooncology. 2015 Sep;24(9):1028-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Ritva Rissanen
Karin Nordin
Johan Ahlgren
Cecilia Arving
Source
Psychooncology. 2015 Sep;24(9):1028-35
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - etiology - therapy
Breast Neoplasms - psychology
Cognitive Therapy
Depression - etiology - therapy
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Middle Aged
Patient Preference
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - methods
Psychotherapy, Group
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - etiology - therapy
Stress, Psychological - etiology - therapy
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To evaluate the mode of delivery of a stress management intervention, in a group or individual setting, on self-reported cancer-related traumatic stress symptoms. A secondary aim was to evaluate a stepped care approach.
All study participants (n?=?425), who were female, newly diagnosed with breast cancer and receiving standard oncological care were offered Step I of the stepped care approach, a stress management education (SME). Thereafter, they were screened for cancer-related traumatic stress symptoms, and, if present (n?=?304), were invited to join Step II, a more intense intervention, derived from cognitive behavioral therapy, to which they were randomized to either a group (n?=?77) or individual (n?=?78) setting. To assess cancer-related traumatic stress symptoms, participants completed the Impact of Event Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at the time of inclusion, three-months post-inclusion and approximately 12-months post-inclusion.
The SME did not significantly decrease any of the cancer-related traumatic stress symptoms. No statistically significant differences were found between the group and the individual setting interventions. However, only 54% of the participants attended the group setting compared to 91% for the individual setting.
The mode of delivery had no effect on the cancer-related traumatic stress symptoms; however, the individual setting was preferred. In future studies, a preference-based RCT design will be recommended for evaluating the different treatment effects.
PubMed ID
25631707 View in PubMed
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[Follow-up of alcoholics. Inpatients at the Solhaugen Rehabilitation Center in 1985 and 1986].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229457
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Mar 10;110(7):847-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1990
Author
S. Bjørnelv
L. Eriksen
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk Institutt, Universitetet i Trondheim, Skatval.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Mar 10;110(7):847-9
Date
Mar-10-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - psychology - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychotherapy
Rehabilitation Centers
Abstract
In this follow-up study 76 inpatient alcoholics who had stayed at a Treatment Centre for Alcoholism for at least 12 weeks were invited to participate. Five had died, seven were not found, and the remaining 64 were interviewed nine to 30 months after discharge. Laboratory tests for liver functioning were also obtained. Only one reported total abstinence, but 30 clients (47%) reported less drinking. Most of them had a better social and economic situation than before the period of treatment.
PubMed ID
2321211 View in PubMed
Less detail

156 records – page 1 of 16.