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45 records – page 1 of 5.

[Neglected psychotic children--need early care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42853
Source
Lakartidningen. 1974 Dec 18;71(51):5264-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-18-1974

[Minimal brain dysfunction syndrome and its significance in adolescence].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature255065
Source
Duodecim. 1973;89(10):742-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973

[Survey of a psychiatric clinic clientele].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248876
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1978 Feb 10;98(4):195-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1978

Dropout and completion of treatment among spouse abusers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194721
Source
Violence Vict. 2001 Apr;16(2):127-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
G. Rondeau
N. Brodeur
S. Brochu
G. Lemire
Author Affiliation
Ecole de service social, Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Violence Vict. 2001 Apr;16(2):127-43
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Patient Dropouts - psychology
Psychotherapy, Group
Quebec
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouse Abuse - prevention & control - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
This study examines a population of spouse abusers undertaking a treatment program. Its purpose was to identify the variables associated with dropout and completion of treatment and to build a predictive model. Data were collected on 286 men who began group treatment in one of eight community programs in the province of Quebec, Canada. Results show that men who complete treatment are older, better educated and have better economic conditions than men who drop out. They also have a more stable family life, have been in a relationship for a longer period of time and have more children with their actual spouse. Men who completed treatment showed more commitment, better working capacities and a higher level of agreement with their therapists, thus developing a stronger therapeutic alliance. Support provided by people in the environment was significantly related to treatment completion. Social and judicial pressures were not related to completion.
PubMed ID
11345474 View in PubMed
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[Psychiatry in the emergency room. Report of 212 consecutive psychiatric cases during a period of 6 months].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110083
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1969 May 1;131(18):798-803
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1969

[Alternative forms of treatment of psychiatric patients]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57219
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Mar 11;153(11):782-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-1991
Author
H. Raben
K H Aggernaes
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk afdeling D, Frederiksberg Hospital.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Mar 11;153(11):782-4
Date
Mar-11-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Complementary Therapies - statistics & numerical data
Costs and Cost Analysis
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Psychotherapy - methods
Sex Factors
Abstract
In the Psychiatric Department of Frederiksberg Hospital, 115 of all 153 admitted patients were interviewed about their use of alternative treatment. Information obtained from the interviews was compared with data in the case records. Of the 115 patients interviewed, 42% had used alternative treatment at least once, while 17% had used alternative treatment within the past three months before the interview. Herbal medicine was the most frequent type of treatment. Nearly one half of the patients wanted treatment because of somatic problems. The frequency of alternative treatment decreased with age. Compared to the entire investigation group, those diagnosed as manic-depressive used alternative treatment more frequently, while schizophrenic patients used this kind of treatment less often. The patients most satisfied with the psychiatric department used alternative treatment less frequently. Use of alternative treatment was not related to duration of disease, or whether the patients were in the ward 24 hours or only during day-time. Only 19 of the 48 patients who had used alternative treatment had paid more than 1,000 Dkr. (approximately pounds 85) in all for the treatment, and only three patients had paid more than 1,000 Dkr. during the past three months. Women had paid relatively more for their treatment than men.
PubMed ID
2008728 View in PubMed
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Treatment prevalence in psychiatric outpatient care in Finland. A comparative study of two areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245468
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1980 Sep;62(3):221-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1980
Author
V. Lehtinen
R K Salokangas
H. Holm
J. Laakso
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1980 Sep;62(3):221-35
Date
Sep-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Family Therapy
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Marriage
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Psychotherapy, Group
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Psychiatric outpatients are surveyed in two separate areas, one (the city of Turku) with clearly above-average provision of mental-health services and the other (predominantly rural Eastern Satakunta) with services corresponding to the average for the country as a whole. The results show that in Turku 3.25% and in Eastern Satakunta 1.98% of the population aged 15 years or more had visited an outpatient treatment unit during the 4-month observation period. Compared with Eastern Satakunta, the patients in turku were relatively more often young persons, men (nearly as often as women), persons in the higher social classes and patients with psychiatric disorders other then psychosis. Treatment received by the patients in Turku was more intensive and included more psychotherapeutic elements. Particularly family-type and group-type therapies were more common in Turku than in Eastern satakunta. The results are considered from the viewpoint for both epidermiologic research and health care policy.
PubMed ID
7457169 View in PubMed
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45 records – page 1 of 5.