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Psychometric analysis of the Swedish panic disorder severity scale and its self-report version.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300038
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2019 Jan; 73(1):58-63
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Martin Svensson
Thomas Nilsson
Håkan Johansson
Gardar Viborg
Sean Perrin
Rolf Sandell
Author Affiliation
a Department of Psychology , Lund University , Lund , SE , Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2019 Jan; 73(1):58-63
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Agoraphobia - classification - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Panic Disorder - classification - therapy
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics
Psychotherapy, Brief
Psychotherapy, Psychodynamic
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Translations
Abstract
Panic disorder, with or without agoraphobia (PDA or PD, respectively), is a major public health problem. After having established a PD diagnosis based on the DSM or the ICD systems, the Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) is the most widely used interview-based instrument for assessing disorder severity. There is also a self-report version of the instrument (PDSS-SR); both exist in a Swedish translation but their psychometric properties remain untested.
We studied 221 patients with PD/PDA recruited to a randomized controlled preference trial of cognitive-behavioral and brief panic-focused psychodynamic psychotherapy. In addition to PDSS and PDSS-SR the participants completed self-reports including the Clinical Outcome in Routine Evaluation - Outcome Measure, Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, Sheehan Disability Scale, Bodily Sensations Questionnaire and the Mobility Inventory for Agoraphobia.
PDSS and PDSS-SR possessed excellent psychometric properties (internal consistency, test-retest reliability) and convergent validity. A single factor structure for both versions was not confirmed. In terms of clinical utility, the PDSS had very high inter-rater reliability and correspondence with PD assessed via structured diagnostic interview. Both versions were sensitive to the effects of PD-focused treatment, although subjects scored systematically lower on the self-report version.
The study confirmed the reliability and validity of the Swedish versions of PDSS and PDSS-SR. Both versions were highly sensitive to the effects of two PD-focused treatments and can be used both in clinical and research settings. However, further investigation of the factor structures of both the PDSS and PDSS-SR is warranted.
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01606592.
PubMed ID
30636466 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Norwegian healthy body image programme: study protocol for a randomized controlled school-based intervention to promote positive body image and prevent disordered eating among Norwegian high school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291831
Source
BMC Psychol. 2018 Mar 06; 6(1):8
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Mar-06-2018
Author
Christine Sundgot-Borgen
Solfrid Bratland-Sanda
Kethe M E Engen
Gunn Pettersen
Oddgeir Friborg
Monica Klungland Torstveit
Elin Kolle
Niva Piran
Jorunn Sundgot-Borgen
Jan H Rosenvinge
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports Medicine, The Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, P.O. Box 4014, Sognsveien 220, N-0806, Oslo, Norway. c.s.borgen@nih.no.
Source
BMC Psychol. 2018 Mar 06; 6(1):8
Date
Mar-06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Image
Clinical Protocols
Feeding and Eating Disorders - therapy
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Norway
Psychotherapy
Schools
Students
Abstract
Body dissatisfaction and disordered eating raise the risk for eating disorders. In the prevention of eating disorders, many programmes have proved partly successful in using cognitive techniques to combat such risk factors. However, specific strategies to actively promote a positive body image are rarely used. The present paper outlines a protocol for a programme integrating the promotion of a positive body image and the prevention of disordered eating.
Using a cluster randomized controlled mixed methods design, 30 high schools and 2481 12th grade students were allocated to the Healthy Body Image programme or to a control condition. The intervention comprised three workshops, each of 90 min with the main themes body image, media literacy, and lifestyle. The intervention was interactive in nature, and were led by trained scientists. The outcome measures include standardized instruments administered pre-post intervention, and at 3 and 12 months follow-ups, respectively. Survey data cover feasibility and implementation issues. Qualitative interviews covers experiential data about students' benefits and satisfaction with the programme.
The present study is one of the first in the body image and disordered eating literature that integrates a health promotion and a disease prevention approach, as well as integrating standardized outcome measures and experiential findings. Along with mediator and moderator analyses it is expected that the Healthy Body Image programme may prove its efficacy. If so, plans are made with respect to further dissemination as well as communicating the findings to regional and national decision makers in the education and health care services.
The study was registered and released at ClinicalTrials.gov 21th August 2016 with the Clinical Trial.gov ID: PRSNCT02901457 . In addition, the study is approved by the Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics.
Notes
Cites: Body Image. 2015 Sep;15:40-3 PMID 26047066
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PubMed ID
29510762 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does the working alliance mediate the effect of routine outcome monitoring (ROM) and alliance feedback on psychotherapy outcomes? A secondary analysis from a randomized clinical trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299441
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2019 Mar; 66(2):234-246
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Heidi Brattland
John Morten Koksvik
Olav Burkeland
Christian A Klöckner
Mariela Loreto Lara-Cabrera
Scott D Miller
Bruce Wampold
Truls Ryum
Valentina Cabral Iversen
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health.
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2019 Mar; 66(2):234-246
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Feedback, Psychological
Female
Health Personnel - standards - trends
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychotherapy - standards - trends
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Little is known about the mechanisms through which routine outcome monitoring (ROM) influences psychotherapy outcomes. In this secondary analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial (Brattland et al., 2018), we investigated whether the working alliance mediated the effect of the Partners for Change Outcome Monitoring System (PCOMS), a ROM system that provides session-by-session feedback on clients' well-being and the alliance. Adult individuals (N = 170) referred for hospital-based outpatient mental health treatment were randomized to individual psychotherapy either with the PCOMS ROM system, or without (treatment as usual [TAU]). Treatment was provided by the same therapists (N = 20) in both conditions. A multilevel mediation model was developed to test if there was a significant indirect effect of ROM on client impairment at posttreatment through the alliance at 2 months' treatment controlled for first-session alliance. Alliance ratings increased more from session 1 to 2 months' treatment in the ROM than TAU condition, and alliance increase was associated with less posttreatment impairment. A significant indirect effect of ROM on treatment outcomes through alliance increase (p = .043) explained an estimated 23.0% of the effect of ROM on outcomes. The results were consistent with a theory of the alliance as one mechanism through which ROM works. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
PubMed ID
30702322 View in PubMed
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The effect of guided self-determination on self-management in persons with type 1 diabetes mellitus and HbA1c =64 mmol/mol: a group-based randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292501
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Jul 03; 7(6):e013295
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Jul-03-2017
Author
Jannike Mohn
Marit Graue
Jõrg Assmus
Vibeke Zoffmann
Hrafnkell Thordarson
Mark Peyrot
Berit Rokne
Author Affiliation
Centre for Evidence-Based Practice, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Bergen, Norway.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Jul 03; 7(6):e013295
Date
Jul-03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - psychology
Female
Glycated Hemoglobin A - analysis
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Norway
Personal Autonomy
Psychotherapy, Group
Self Report
Self-Management - education
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine whether the impact of guided self-determination (GSD) applied in group training (GSD-GT) in people with chronically elevated HbA1c and type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) was superior to 'care as usual' in improving HbA1c and psychological functioning.
An outpatient clinic at a university hospital in Western Norway.
A total of 178 adults (all Caucasian) aged 18-55 (mean age 36.7±10.7, 62% women) with type 1 DM for at least 1 year and HbA1c =64 mmol/mol (8.0%) were randomly assigned to participate in either GSD-GT or a control group (CG). Exclusion criteria were severe comorbidity, major psychiatric disorder, cognitive deficiency/language barriers and pregnancy.
Intervention group met seven times for 2 hours over 14 weeks to promote patient autonomy and intrinsic motivation using reflection sheets and advanced professional communication in accordance with the GSD methodology.
The primary outcome was HbA1c and secondary outcomes (all outcomes 9 months post intervention) were self-monitored blood glucose frequency, self-reported diabetes competence, autonomy support by healthcare providers (Health Care Climate Questionnaire), autonomous versus controlled diabetes motivation (Treatment Self-Regulation Questionnaire), diabetes distress (Problem Areas In Diabetes Scale (PAID) and Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS)), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale) and psychological well-being (World Health Organization five-item Well-Being Index scale).
Among participants allocated to the GSD-GT (=90) 48 completed the study, whereas 83 completed in the CG (n=88). With 95% CIs GSD-GT did not have effect on HbA1c (B -0.18, CI (-0.48, 0.12), p=0.234). GSD-GT improved autonomy-motivated behaviour (B 0.51, CI (0.25, 0.77), p
Notes
Cites: Diabetologia. 1987 Sep;30(9):681-90 PMID 3123298
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2007 Jan;30 Suppl 1:S4-S41 PMID 17192377
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Cites: Prim Care Diabetes. 2008 Sep;2(3):113-20 PMID 18779034
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Cites: Qual Health Res. 2012 Jan;22(1):103-18 PMID 21876206
PubMed ID
28674125 View in PubMed
Less detail

Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS) compared to treatment as usual (TAU) for suicidal patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289676
Source
Trials. 2016 10 03; 17(1):481
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Pragmatic Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-03-2016
Author
Wenche Ryberg
Roar Fosse
Per Henrik Zahl
Inge Brorson
Paul Møller
Nils Inge Landrø
David Jobes
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Lier, Norway. Wenche.ryberg@vestreviken.no.
Source
Trials. 2016 10 03; 17(1):481
Date
10-03-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Pragmatic Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Checklist
Clinical Protocols
Cognition
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Mental health
Norway
Patient care team
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - methods
Research Design
Risk factors
Suicidal ideation
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS) is a therapeutic framework that appears promising to reduce suicidal ideation and suicidal cognition. CAMS has not previously been evaluated in a standard specialized mental health care setting for patients with suicidal problems in general. In this pragmatic randomized controlled trial (RCT) we will investigate if CAMS is more effective than treatment as usual (TAU) in reducing suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Effects will also be investigated on mental health and symptom relief in general and upon readmissions to inpatient units.
The study is a multicenter, observer-blinded, superiority, two-armed RCT which will include patients from four clinical departments at Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Norway. We aim to include 100 patients with moderate to strong suicidal problems, as defined by a score of 13 or more on Beck's Scale for Suicide Ideation - Current. Patients are included regardless of diagnosis. Randomization will be performed using a stratified four-block procedure with treatment unit as the stratification variable. The duration of treatment will vary depending on patients' needs and clinical assessments. Patients are interviewed by research staff at four checkpoints: baseline, 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months. Central outcome measures are the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation - Current, Outcome Questionnaire - 45, and Suicide Attempt Self-Injury Count.
This pragmatic trial is effectuated within the Public Health Care System in Norway, where patients have multiple problems and diagnoses and therapists have a high work load. Results from this trial are highly generalizable to a typical everyday clinical setting, and one should expect similar results if CAMS is implemented in the future as a standard component in specialized mental health care systems.
Open Science Framework: DOI 10.17605/OSF.IO/JHRM2 . Registered 5 July 2015. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02685943 . Registered on 8 February 2016.
Notes
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Jan;47(1):1-9 PMID 21052623
Cites: Psychother Res. 2014;24(4):504-13 PMID 24188797
Cites: JAMA. 2005 Aug 3;294(5):563-70 PMID 16077050
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 2011 Aug;58(8):A4300 PMID 21827722
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2010 Jan;61(1):25-31 PMID 20044414
Cites: Psychotherapy (Chic). 2012 Mar;49(1):72-80 PMID 22369081
Cites: Depress Anxiety. 2011 Nov;28(11):963-72 PMID 21948348
Cites: J Clin Psychol. 2006 Feb;62(2):161-70 PMID 16342292
Cites: Psychol Assess. 2015 Dec;27(4):1171-81 PMID 25894705
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PubMed ID
27716298 View in PubMed
Less detail

Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS) compared to treatment as usual (TAU) for suicidal patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289518
Source
Trials. 2016 10 03; 17(1):481
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Pragmatic Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-03-2016
Author
Wenche Ryberg
Roar Fosse
Per Henrik Zahl
Inge Brorson
Paul Møller
Nils Inge Landrø
David Jobes
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Lier, Norway. Wenche.ryberg@vestreviken.no.
Source
Trials. 2016 10 03; 17(1):481
Date
10-03-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Pragmatic Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Checklist
Clinical Protocols
Cognition
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Mental health
Norway
Patient care team
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - methods
Research Design
Risk factors
Suicidal ideation
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS) is a therapeutic framework that appears promising to reduce suicidal ideation and suicidal cognition. CAMS has not previously been evaluated in a standard specialized mental health care setting for patients with suicidal problems in general. In this pragmatic randomized controlled trial (RCT) we will investigate if CAMS is more effective than treatment as usual (TAU) in reducing suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Effects will also be investigated on mental health and symptom relief in general and upon readmissions to inpatient units.
The study is a multicenter, observer-blinded, superiority, two-armed RCT which will include patients from four clinical departments at Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Norway. We aim to include 100 patients with moderate to strong suicidal problems, as defined by a score of 13 or more on Beck's Scale for Suicide Ideation - Current. Patients are included regardless of diagnosis. Randomization will be performed using a stratified four-block procedure with treatment unit as the stratification variable. The duration of treatment will vary depending on patients' needs and clinical assessments. Patients are interviewed by research staff at four checkpoints: baseline, 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months. Central outcome measures are the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation - Current, Outcome Questionnaire - 45, and Suicide Attempt Self-Injury Count.
This pragmatic trial is effectuated within the Public Health Care System in Norway, where patients have multiple problems and diagnoses and therapists have a high work load. Results from this trial are highly generalizable to a typical everyday clinical setting, and one should expect similar results if CAMS is implemented in the future as a standard component in specialized mental health care systems.
Open Science Framework: DOI 10.17605/OSF.IO/JHRM2 . Registered 5 July 2015. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02685943 . Registered on 8 February 2016.
Notes
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Jan;47(1):1-9 PMID 21052623
Cites: Psychother Res. 2014;24(4):504-13 PMID 24188797
Cites: JAMA. 2005 Aug 3;294(5):563-70 PMID 16077050
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 2011 Aug;58(8):A4300 PMID 21827722
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2010 Jan;61(1):25-31 PMID 20044414
Cites: Psychotherapy (Chic). 2012 Mar;49(1):72-80 PMID 22369081
Cites: Depress Anxiety. 2011 Nov;28(11):963-72 PMID 21948348
Cites: J Clin Psychol. 2006 Feb;62(2):161-70 PMID 16342292
Cites: Psychol Assess. 2015 Dec;27(4):1171-81 PMID 25894705
Cites: Am J Psychother. 2012;66(3):227-42 PMID 23091884
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1983 Mar;40(3):249-57 PMID 6830404
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1999 Dec;52(12):1143-56 PMID 10580777
Cites: Psychol Med. 2003 Apr;33(3):395-405 PMID 12701661
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 1998;59 Suppl 20:22-33;quiz 34-57 PMID 9881538
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Apr;62(4):427-32 PMID 15809410
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2015 May;172(5):441-9 PMID 25677353
Cites: Behav Res Ther. 1997 Nov;35(11):1039-46 PMID 9431735
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Jan 1-7;365(9453):82-93 PMID 15639683
Cites: Eur Addict Res. 2005;11(1):22-31 PMID 15608468
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006 Jul;63(7):757-66 PMID 16818865
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2009 Jun;39(3):307-20 PMID 19606922
Cites: Addiction. 1993 Jun;88(6):791-804 PMID 8329970
Cites: Addict Behav. 2012 Jan;37(1):36-41 PMID 21937169
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2015 Jan 12;:null PMID 25581595
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PubMed ID
27716298 View in PubMed
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Comparing counselling models for the hazardous use of alcohol at the Swedish National Alcohol Helpline: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291890
Source
Trials. 2017 Jun 06; 18(1):257
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Jun-06-2017
Author
Eleonor Säfsten
Yvonne Forsell
Mats Ramstedt
Maria Rosaria Galanti
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. eleonor.safsten@ki.se.
Source
Trials. 2017 Jun 06; 18(1):257
Date
Jun-06-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - prevention & control - psychology
Alcoholism - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Counseling - methods
Dangerous Behavior
Female
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hotlines
Humans
Intention to Treat Analysis
Linear Models
Male
Motivational Interviewing
Pamphlets
Patient Education as Topic
Psychotherapy, Brief
Research Design
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Hazardous and harmful consumption of alcohol is a leading cause of preventable disease and premature deaths. Modifying the amount and pattern of risky alcohol consumption conveys substantial benefits to individuals and to society at large. Telephone helplines provide a feasible alternative to face-to-face counselling in order to increase the reach of brief interventions aiming at modifying the hazardous and harmful use of alcohol. However, there is a lack of studies on the implementation and evaluation of population-based telephone services for the prevention and treatment of alcohol misuse.
A randomised controlled trial was designed to compare a brief, structured intervention to usual care within the Swedish National Alcohol Helpline (SAH), concerning their effectiveness on decreasing the hazardous use of alcohol. Between May 2015 and December 2017, about 300 callers are to be individually randomised with a 1:1 ratio to a brief, structured intervention (n?=?150) or to usual care (n?=?150). The brief, structured intervention consists of the delivery of a self-help booklet followed by one proactive call from SAH counsellors to monitor and give feedback about the client's progression. Callers assigned to usual care receive telephone counselling according to existing practice, i.e., motivational interviewing in a tailored and client-driven combination of proactive and reactive calls. The primary outcome is defined as a change from a higher to a lower AUDIT risk-level category between baseline and follow-up. General linear modeling will be used to calculate risk ratios of the outcome events. The primary analysis will follow an intention-to-treat (ITT) approach.
The trial is designed to evaluate the effectiveness in decreasing the hazardous and harmful consumption of alcohol of a brief, structured intervention compared to usual care when delivered at the SAH. The results of the study will be used locally to improve the effectiveness of the service provided at the SAH. Additionally, they will expand the evidence base about optimal counselling models in population-based telephone services for alcohol misuse prevention and treatment.
ISRCNT.com, ID: ISRCTN13160878 . Retrospectively registered on 18 January 2016.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28587621 View in PubMed
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Depression and Depression Treatment in a Population-Based Study of Individuals Over 60 Years Old Without Dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289711
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 Aug; 24(8):615-623
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Björn Karlsson
Kristina Johnell
Robert Sigström
Linnea Sjöberg
Laura Fratiglioni
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: bjorn.karlsson@ki.se.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 Aug; 24(8):615-623
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology - therapy
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Inappropriate Prescribing
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - methods
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden
Abstract
To estimate the prevalence of depression in a population-based sample of older adults, and to identify the individual profile of people who received depression treatment.
Cross-sectional.
Central area (Kungsholmen) in Stockholm, Sweden.
A randomized population-based sample of individuals aged 60 years and older (N?=?3,084) without dementia from the Swedish National Study of Aging and Care in Kungsholmen examined between 2001 and 2004.
Experienced physicians carried out a semi-structured psychiatric examination including the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale. Depression was diagnosed according to DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 criteria. Information regarding drug treatment and psychotherapy was collected during the examination and is based on self-report.
The prevalence of depression was 5.9% (major depression: 0.8%, minor depression: 5.1%). In the total sample, 8.3% were prescribed an antidepressant and 0.9% were treated with psychotherapy. Among individuals with depression, fewer than one-third received treatment with psychotherapy or antidepressants, but almost half were prescribed anxiolytic or hypnotic drugs. Individuals with self-reported depression and anxiety were more likely to receive depression treatment whereas individuals with depression who reported insomnia were less likely to receive depression treatment.
Our findings indicate that even in a central urban area of a country with an advanced healthcare system depression in old age is often unrecognized and untreated. In addition, almost half of those with depression received potentially inappropriate drug treatment with anxiolytics or hypnotics.
PubMed ID
27297634 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depression and Depression Treatment in a Population-Based Study of Individuals Over 60 Years Old Without Dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289553
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 Aug; 24(8):615-623
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Björn Karlsson
Kristina Johnell
Robert Sigström
Linnea Sjöberg
Laura Fratiglioni
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: bjorn.karlsson@ki.se.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 Aug; 24(8):615-623
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology - therapy
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Inappropriate Prescribing
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - methods
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden
Abstract
To estimate the prevalence of depression in a population-based sample of older adults, and to identify the individual profile of people who received depression treatment.
Cross-sectional.
Central area (Kungsholmen) in Stockholm, Sweden.
A randomized population-based sample of individuals aged 60 years and older (N?=?3,084) without dementia from the Swedish National Study of Aging and Care in Kungsholmen examined between 2001 and 2004.
Experienced physicians carried out a semi-structured psychiatric examination including the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale. Depression was diagnosed according to DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 criteria. Information regarding drug treatment and psychotherapy was collected during the examination and is based on self-report.
The prevalence of depression was 5.9% (major depression: 0.8%, minor depression: 5.1%). In the total sample, 8.3% were prescribed an antidepressant and 0.9% were treated with psychotherapy. Among individuals with depression, fewer than one-third received treatment with psychotherapy or antidepressants, but almost half were prescribed anxiolytic or hypnotic drugs. Individuals with self-reported depression and anxiety were more likely to receive depression treatment whereas individuals with depression who reported insomnia were less likely to receive depression treatment.
Our findings indicate that even in a central urban area of a country with an advanced healthcare system depression in old age is often unrecognized and untreated. In addition, almost half of those with depression received potentially inappropriate drug treatment with anxiolytics or hypnotics.
PubMed ID
27297634 View in PubMed
Less detail

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