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Multilevel Exploratory Factor Analysis of the Feeling Word Checklist-24.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292733
Source
Assessment. 2017 Oct; 24(7):907-918
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Karin Lindqvist
Fredrik Falkenström
Rolf Sandell
Rolf Holmqvist
Annika Ekeblad
Agneta Thorén
Author Affiliation
1 The Erica Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Assessment. 2017 Oct; 24(7):907-918
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Checklist
Emotions
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Male
Multilevel Analysis
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychometrics - methods
Psychotherapy - instrumentation - methods - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Sweden
Abstract
Emotional reactions are a vital part of the therapeutic relationship. The Feeling Word Checklist-24 (FWC-24) is an instrument asking the clinician (or the patient) to report to what degree he or she has experienced various feelings during a therapeutic interaction. The aim of this study was to assess the factor structure of the clinician-rated FWC-24 when taking dependencies in the data into account. The sample was deliberately heterogeneous and consisted of 4,443 ratings made by 101 psychotherapists working with different psychotherapy methods in relation to 191 patients of different ages, genders, and with different primary diagnoses. A random intercept-only model revealed large intraclass correlation coefficients at the therapist level, indicating that a multilevel analysis was warranted. A two-level exploratory factor analysis with therapists as the between level and patients plus sessions as the within level was conducted. The items from FWC-24 were found to be best represented by four factors on the between level and four factors on the within level. The factor structures were largely similar on the two levels and were labeled Engaged, Inadequate, Relaxed, and Moved. The different factors explained different amounts of variance on different levels, indicating that some factors are more therapist dependent and some more patient dependent.
PubMed ID
26893388 View in PubMed
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Are therapists uniformly effective across patient outcome domains? A study on therapist effectiveness in two different treatment contexts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280038
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2016 Jul;63(4):367-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Helene A Nissen-Lie
Simon B Goldberg
William T Hoyt
Fredrik Falkenström
Rolf Holmqvist
Stevan Lars Nielsen
Bruce E Wampold
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2016 Jul;63(4):367-78
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Counseling - methods
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - therapy
Mental health
Middle Aged
Psychotherapy - methods
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
As established in several studies, therapists differ in effectiveness. A vital research task now is to understand what characterizes more or less effective therapists, and investigate whether this differential effectiveness systematically depends on client factors, such as the type of mental health problem. The purpose of the current study was to examine whether therapists are universally effective across patient outcome domains reflecting different areas of mental health functioning. Data were obtained from 2 sites: the Research Consortium of Counseling and Psychological Services in Higher Education (N = 5,828) in the United States and from primary and secondary care units (N = 616) in Sweden. Outcome domains were assessed via the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (Lambert et al., 2004) and the CORE-OM (Evans et al., 2002). Multilevel models with observations nested within patients were used to derive a reliable estimate for each patient's change (which we call a multilevel growth d) based on all reported assessment points. Next, 2 multilevel confirmatory factor analytic models were fit in which these effect sizes (multilevel ds) for the 3 subscales of the OQ-45 (Study 1) and 6 subscales of CORE-OM (Study 2) were indicators of 1 common latent factor at the therapist level. In both data sets, such a model, reflecting a global therapist effectiveness factor, yielded large factor loadings and excellent model fit. Results suggest that therapists effective (or ineffective) within one outcome domain are also effective within another outcome domain. Tentatively, therapist effectiveness can thus be conceived of as a global construct. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMed ID
27124549 View in PubMed
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Deteriorated and unchanged patients in psychological treatment in Swedish primary care and psychiatry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274495
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2016;70(1):16-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Jakob Mechler
Rolf Holmqvist
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2016;70(1):16-23
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Community Mental Health Services
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Primary Health Care
Psychotherapy - methods
Sweden
Treatment Failure
Abstract
Despite substantial effect sizes for psychological therapy among different diagnosis groups and in different treatment contexts, many studies show that a large proportion of patients do not attain reliable improvement and a substantial portion are worse off after treatment. Previous studies suggest that patients in psychiatry may have worse outcome than patients in primary care.
In this practice-based study of psychological treatment in Swedish primary care and adult psychiatry, the proportions of patients who did not improve and who deteriorated were assessed.
Proportions of reliably improved, unchanged, and reliably deteriorated patients among 840 patients in primary care and 317 patients in specialist psychiatry were assessed by self-ratings using the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation - Outcome Measure (CORE-OM).
More than half of the patients did not change reliably. About 2% of the patients in primary care and 7% in psychiatry deteriorated. Multilevel analyses of the data from primary care indicated that there were no therapist effects.
The results emphasize the importance of monitoring treatment continuously in order to increase results for patients who do not improve.
PubMed ID
25994483 View in PubMed
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The effects of psychological treatment in primary care in Sweden--a practice-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113167
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Apr;68(3):204-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Rolf Holmqvist
Thomas Ström
Anniqa Foldemo
Author Affiliation
Rolf Holmqvist, Ph.D., Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University , Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Apr;68(3):204-12
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - psychology - therapy
Cognitive Therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Mental health services
Models, Statistical
Primary Health Care - methods
Psychotherapy - instrumentation
Questionnaires
Self-Assessment
Social Support
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Practice-based studies have found substantial effects of psychological treatment in routine care, often equivalent between treatment methods. Factors that moderate treatment outcome may be important to assess.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment outcome in psychological treatment in primary care, and to compare outcome between the most frequently used methods. An additional aim was to study factors that might moderate outcome differences.
The Clinical Outcome in Routine Evaluation (CORE) system was used to evaluate psychological treatment at Swedish primary care centers. Treatment methods were coded by the therapists after treatment. Three major treatment orientations-directive (cognitive, behavioral and CBT), reflective (psychodynamic and relational) and supportive therapy were compared. Patient and therapist variables were studied as treatment moderating factors.
Analyses of 733 therapies, delivered by 70 therapists, showed good results in short psychological treatments (median session number = 6). Forty-three percent of the patients were remitted, 34% recovered. For patients receiving at least five sessions, the figures were 50% and 40%. Directive therapy and reflective therapy had comparable outcome, and better than supportive treatment. Patients in supportive therapy had higher age and received fewer therapy sessions. The patients' motivation, alliance capacity and reflective ability, as rated by the therapist after treatment, were lower for patients in supportive treatment.
Psychological treatment in primary care obtains god results. Supportive therapy should be studied more systematically, particularly with regard to variables that may moderate treatment outcome.
PubMed ID
23758533 View in PubMed
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Randomized Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder in a Community-Based Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287983
Source
Depress Anxiety. 2016 12;33(12):1090-1098
Publication Type
Article
Date
12-2016
Author
Annika Ekeblad
Fredrik Falkenström
Gerhard Andersson
Robert Vestberg
Rolf Holmqvist
Source
Depress Anxiety. 2016 12;33(12):1090-1098
Date
12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Community Mental Health Services - methods
Depressive Disorder, Major - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - methods
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are both evidence-based treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD). Several head-to-head comparisons have been made, mostly in the United States. In this trial, we compared the two treatments in a small-town outpatient psychiatric clinic in Sweden. The patients had failed previous primary care treatment and had extensive Axis-II comorbidity. Outcome measures were reduction of depressive symptoms and attrition rate.
Ninety-six psychiatric patients with MDD (DSM-IV) were randomized to 14 sessions of CBT (n = 48) or IPT (n = 48). A noninferiority design was used with the hypothesis that IPT would be noninferior to CBT. A three-point difference on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used as noninferiority margin.
IPT passed the noninferiority test. In the ITT group, 53.5% (23/43) of the IPT patients and 51.0% (24/47) of the CBT patients were reliably improved, and 20.9% (9/43) and 19.1% (9/47), respectively, were recovered (last BDI score
PubMed ID
27029912 View in PubMed
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How much therapy is enough? Comparing dose-effect and good-enough models in two different settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279147
Source
Psychotherapy (Chic). 2016 Mar;53(1):130-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Fredrik Falkenström
Albin Josefsson
Tore Berggren
Rolf Holmqvist
Source
Psychotherapy (Chic). 2016 Mar;53(1):130-9
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Psychotherapy - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
The Dose-Effect model holds that longer therapy leads to better outcome, although increasing treatment length will yield diminishing returns, as additional sessions lead to progressively less change in a negatively accelerating fashion. In contrast, the Good-Enough-Level (GEL) model proposes that patients, therapists, or patients-with-therapists decide on ending treatment when treatment outcome is satisfactory, meaning that patients who change faster will have shorter treatments. If true, this means that aggregating among patients with different treatment lengths would yield biased results. Most previous research has shown that symptom change rate depends on treatment length, but all of these studies used data from University counseling centers in the United States. There is a need to test if previous results hold in different settings. Two datasets from Swedish community-based primary care (n = 640) and psychiatric care (n = 284) were used. Patients made session-wise ratings on the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM). Multilevel models indicated better fit for a model in which treatment length moderated symptom change rate. In the primary care sample, patients in longer treatments achieved more symptom change from pre- to posttreatment, despite having slower rate of improvement. The most important aspect of the GEL model was supported, and no evidence was found for a negatively accelerating Dose-Effect curve. Results cannot be generalized beyond about 12 sessions, due to scarcity of data for longer treatments.
PubMed ID
26928273 View in PubMed
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Attachment style among outpatients with substance use disorders in psychological treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298631
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2018 12; 91(4):490-508
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Ylva Gidhagen
Rolf Holmqvist
Björn Philips
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2018 12; 91(4):490-508
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Object Attachment
Outpatients - psychology
Psychotherapy - methods
Regression Analysis
Stress, Psychological
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - therapy
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the associations between self-rated attachment style, psychological distress and substance use among substance use disorder (SUD) outpatients in psychological treatment.
In this practice-based study, 108 outpatients were asked to fill in the Experiences in Close Relationships - Short form, the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation - Outcome Measure (CORE-OM), the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), and the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) at treatment start and end. Patients were given psychological treatments with a directive, reflective or supportive orientation.
An insecure attachment style was more common among the SUD outpatients, compared to non-clinical groups. Patients with a fearful attachment style scored higher on psychological distress than patients with a secure attachment style. The associations between the attachment dimensions and psychological distress were stronger than those between attachment and SUD. Significantly more patients had a secure attachment style at treatment end.
This study shows significant relations between patients' attachment style and their initial psychological distress. The causal relationship between attachment style and psychological distress is, however, not clear and can likely go in both directions. The psychological treatment of patients with SUD contributed significantly to changes from insecure to secure attachment style.
We found among patients with SUD a strong relation between patients' attachment style and their psychological distress. Knowledge of the patient's attachment style may help the therapist to tailor the treatment to the patient's needs. A change from insecure to secure attachment style can be an important goal for a SUD treatment, as it may prevent the patient from using defence strategies involving substance use for regulating emotions and interpersonal relationships.
PubMed ID
29399945 View in PubMed
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Development and validation of a 6-item working alliance questionnaire for repeated administrations during psychotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278814
Source
Psychol Assess. 2015 Mar;27(1):169-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Fredrik Falkenström
Robert L Hatcher
Tommy Skjulsvik
Mattias Holmqvist Larsson
Rolf Holmqvist
Source
Psychol Assess. 2015 Mar;27(1):169-83
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cooperative Behavior
Counseling
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physician-Patient Relations
Primary Health Care
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Psychotherapy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Symptom Assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
Recently, researchers have started to measure the working alliance repeatedly across sessions of psychotherapy, relating the working alliance to symptom change session by session. Responding to questionnaires after each session can become tedious, leading to careless responses and/or increasing levels of missing data. Therefore, assessment with the briefest possible instrument is desirable. Because previous research on the Working Alliance Inventory has found the separation of the Goal and Task factors problematic, the present study examined the psychometric properties of a 2-factor, 6-item working alliance measure, adapted from the Working Alliance Inventory, in 3 patient samples (ns = 1,095, 235, and 234). Results showed that a bifactor model fit the data well across the 3 samples, and the factor structure was stable across 10 sessions of primary care counseling/psychotherapy. Although the bifactor model with 1 general and 2 specific factors outperformed the 1-factor model in terms of model fit, dimensionality analyses based on the bifactor model results indicated that in practice the instrument is best treated as unidimensional. Results support the use of composite scores of all 6 items. The instrument was validated by replicating previous findings of session-by-session prediction of symptom reduction using the Autoregressive Latent Trajectory model. The 6-item working alliance scale, called the Session Alliance Inventory, is a promising alternative for researchers in search for a brief alliance measure to administer after every session.
PubMed ID
25346997 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.