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An empirical study of countertransference reactions toward patients with personality disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78017
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2007 May-Jun;48(3):225-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Rossberg Jan Ivar
Karterud Sigmund
Pedersen Geir
Friis Svein
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Division, Ullevaal University Hospital, 0407 Oslo, Norway; Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, 0407 Oslo, Norway. j.i.rxssberg@medisin.uio.no
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2007 May-Jun;48(3):225-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cognitive Therapy
Countertransference (Psychology)
Emotions
Female
Humans
Male
Patient Dropouts
Personality Disorders - psychology - therapy
Psychotherapy, Group
Questionnaires
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The study examined to what extent patients with cluster A + B personality disorders (PDs) evoked other countertransference reactions among psychotherapists compared with patients with cluster C PDs as well as the relationship between the different countertransference reactions and outcome. METHODS: A total of 11 therapists at the Department for Personality Psychiatry, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway, filled out the Feeling Word Checklist-58 (FWC-58), 2 weeks after admission and 2 weeks before discharge, for 71 patients admitted to the day treatment program. The patients were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Disorders (SCID-II). RESULTS: The study revealed that patients with cluster A + B PDs evoked more negative and less positive countertransference reactions than those with cluster C PDs. The psychotherapists varied significantly more in their reported countertransference reactions toward patients with cluster A + B PDs than toward those with cluster C PDs. Patients who dropped out of treatment evoked significantly more negative countertransference reactions after 2 weeks than patients who completed the treatment. In addition, the study revealed strong correlations between countertransference feelings and change during the treatment. CONCLUSIONS: This empirical study confirms clinical narratives on specified relationships between countertransference reactions, different PDs, and treatment course.
PubMed ID
17445515 View in PubMed
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Early detection of first-episode psychosis: the effect on 1-year outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81653
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2006 Oct;32(4):758-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Larsen Tor K
Melle Ingrid
Auestad Bjørn
Friis Svein
Haahr Ulrik
Johannessen Jan Olav
Opjordsmoen Stein
Rund Bjørn Rishovd
Simonsen Erik
Vaglum Per
McGlashan Thomas
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Clinic, University of Stavanger, Armauer Hansensv. 20, PB 8100, N-4068 Stavanger, Norway. tklarsen@online.no
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2006 Oct;32(4):758-64
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Algorithms
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Early Diagnosis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - supply & distribution
Middle Aged
Norway
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Psychotherapy
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - therapy
Schizophrenic Psychology
Abstract
Early intervention is assumed to improve outcome in first-episode psychosis, but this has not been proven. OBJECTIVE: To study whether 1-year outcome will be better in a health care sector with early detection (ED) of psychosis compared with sectors with no early detection (no-ED). DESIGN: A quasi-experimental study with ED in 2 experimental sectors and no-ED in 2 control sectors. ED was achieved through low-threshold ED teams and information campaigns about psychosis for the public, schools, and primary health care providers. The ED and no-ED health care areas offered an equivalent assessment and treatment program during the first year. Two hundred and eighty-one patients were included; 88% were reassessed after 1 year. RESULTS: The ED-area patients (N = 141) had a median duration of untreated psychosis of 5 weeks at baseline compared with 16 weeks for patients in the no-ED area (N = 140). Positive and general symptoms, global assessment of functioning, quality of life, time to remission, and course of psychosis at 1 year after the start of treatment were not different between ED and no-ED groups. Outcome was significantly better for the ED area for negative symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The ED, no-ED differences at baseline become attenuated by 1 year but not the difference in negative symptoms, suggesting secondary prevention in this domain of psychopathology. However, this possibility requires further testing by follow-up and replication.
PubMed ID
16809640 View in PubMed
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Multifamily group treatment in a program for patients with first-episode psychosis: experiences from the TIPS project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78866
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2007 Feb;58(2):171-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Fjell Anne
Bloch Thorsen Gerd Ragna
Friis Svein
Johannessen Jan Olav
Larsen Tor K
Lie Kari
Lyse Hanne-Grethe
Melle Ingrid
Simonsen Erik
Smeby Nina Aarhus
Øxnevad Anne Lise
McFarlane William R
Vaglum Per
McGlashan Thomas
Author Affiliation
Ullevål University Hospital, N-0407 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2007 Feb;58(2):171-3
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Caregivers - education - psychology
Combined Modality Therapy
Denmark
Education
Family Therapy
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Education
Professional-Family Relations
Psychotherapy, Group
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Research
Social Support
Abstract
Psychoeducational multifamily group treatment based on the McFarlane model was implemented for adult patients experiencing a first episode of psychosis and for the families of 301 patients. Patients were participants in a research project in Norway and Denmark. Of 301 patients 246 were invited to participate and 147 agreed. Patients' reluctance to participate increased with age. Most had to wait between six and 12 months until a sufficient number was gathered to start a group. Treatment was well received by patients and families. Care should be taken to prevent a long delay before group commencement at this stressful period in the lives of patients and families.
PubMed ID
17287370 View in PubMed
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