Skip header and navigation

Refine By

12 records – page 1 of 2.

Source
Ther Umsch. 1973 Feb;30(2):107-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1973
Author
R. Schmeitzky
Source
Ther Umsch. 1973 Feb;30(2):107-11
Date
Feb-1973
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark
Humans
Psychotherapy, Group
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
PubMed ID
4686247 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Organization plan of the psychiatric clinic in Linköping, Sweden. The psychiatric hospital as a group therapeutic situation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109861
Source
Z Psychother Med Psychol. 1969 Nov;19(6):229-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1969

[Diagnosis and therapy of functional cardiac disorders in neurasthenic patients at health resorts].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252921
Source
Psychiatr Neurol Med Psychol (Leipz). 1974 Dec;26(12):738-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1974

[The psychiatric hospital in the process of changing. Reorganization attempts with special reference to social psychiatric and psychotherapeutic measures].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246322
Source
Psychiatr Clin (Basel). 1980;13(3-4):217-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
N. Retterstøl
Source
Psychiatr Clin (Basel). 1980;13(3-4):217-33
Date
1980
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services - trends
Community Psychiatry - trends
Forecasting
Hospitals, Psychiatric - organization & administration - trends
Humans
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Psychotherapy - trends
Scandinavia
Social Adjustment
Abstract
The author reviews briefly the recent history of psychiatric hospitals, with particular reference to changes which have taken place in the Scandinavian countries. He also reviews the new expectations society has of psychiatric hospitals and of their role. He concludes that the psychiatric hospital has still an important role to play but that its organization and aims will have to change. He gives a number of guidelines for the changes and describes his own experience as director of two psychiatric hospitals in Norway which under his guidance underwent the transition from the old to their new function. The hospital here described in detail is called 'Gaustad', situated in Oslo. He outlines the planning procedure and the way the plans were implemented. Finally he asked each professional group working in the hospital as well as the patients to evaluate the changes. By and large, all groups seemed to welcome the new way of working. Finally staff and patients give opinions as to what functions should be expected of the hospital in the future and the author gives his own ideas. He feels the psychiatric hospitals will have to change, but they have to continue to play an important and, in some ways, unique role.
PubMed ID
7244282 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Mother-child treatment in psychiatry. III. The author's own experiences--practical implementation and discussion]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59008
Source
Psychiatr Prax. 1997 Nov;24(6):281-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
H P Hartmann
Author Affiliation
Klinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Krankenhaus Weilmünster.
Source
Psychiatr Prax. 1997 Nov;24(6):281-5
Date
Nov-1997
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Prognosis
Psychology, Social
Psychotherapy - methods
Psychotic Disorders - psychology - therapy
Puerperal Disorders - psychology - therapy
Abstract
With regard to experiences described in the literature, and the particular psychotherapeutic and paedagogic effects on mother and child in the inpatient treatment setup presented in this paper, we give an account of the preliminary deliberations and preconditions arising from this particular setup. Prognostically unfavourable aspects of joint admission and treatment are also presented. Finally, previous experiences are discussed, and suggestions for improvement of care for mentally ill mothers and their infants or toddlers are made, taking into consideration the facilities existing in England and Denmark.
PubMed ID
9490442 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Attitude towards psychotherapy in the Russian population and in the population with a Russian/Soviet cultural background in Germany. A pilot study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175668
Source
Nervenarzt. 2006 Jan;77(1):64-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
D. Ditte
W. Schulz
G. Schmid-Ott
Author Affiliation
Institut für Psychologie, Technische Universität Braunschweig.
Source
Nervenarzt. 2006 Jan;77(1):64-72
Date
Jan-2006
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Psychotherapy
Questionnaires
Siberia - ethnology
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We assumed that persons with a Russian/Soviet cultural background have a more skeptical attitude towards psychotherapy than persons with a German background because of the poor distribution of psychotherapy and the knowledge about this kind of treatment in Russia.
We compared the views of Russian probands (n=40), Russian migrants living in Germany (n=65) and German probands (n=70) with the "Questionnaire on Attitudes towards Psychotherapeutic Treatment" (QAPT). For the study of the Russian probands we translated the questionnaire into the Russian language.
The psychometric examination predominantly suggests the quality of the Russian version of the QAPT. Russian probands showed a more skeptical attitude towards psychotherapy compared to the German probands. The migrants had a tendentially more negative attitude than the Germans and a more positive attitude than the Russians. However, we could not determine any differences concerning the anticipated social acceptance regarding participation in psychotherapy.
The results suggest the relevance of culture-specific factors in psychotherapy and an increased need for information of persons with a Russian/Soviet cultural background about psychotherapy.
PubMed ID
15776258 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Quality of life of patients with metastatic breast or intestinal cancer, treated with anthroposophic medicine or with mainstream medicine, the latter with or without psycho-oncologic or supplementary anthroposophic therapy]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21171
Source
Forsch Komplementarmed. 1999 Feb;6 Suppl 1:35-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
T. Cerny
P. Heusser
Source
Forsch Komplementarmed. 1999 Feb;6 Suppl 1:35-7
Date
Feb-1999
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Anthroposophy
Breast Neoplasms - pathology - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Combined Modality Therapy
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Intestinal Neoplasms - pathology - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Staging
Psychotherapy, Group
Quality of Life
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
This project dealt with two subjects. On the one hand, the measurement of the quality of life of cancer patients which needed to be further refined in order to assess the usefulness and efficacy of a treatment by complementary medicine. On the other hand, it was important to know whether severely ill cancer patients treated in an anthroposophical clinic would differ from equally ill patients in a university hospital in terms of attitude towards their illness and in terms of clinical diagnosis. Finally, an attempt was made to demonstrate an improvement of quality of life in conventionally treated patients of the university hospital, who were offered an additional treatment either with a supportive-expressive group therapy or with an anthroposophical therapy. More than 500 patients participated in the study. There were marked sociodemographic and medical differences between the patients of the anthroposophical clinic and those of the university hospital. In addition, it seems that spiritually oriented and active, problem-oriented coping contribute a lot to the quality of life. It was not possible to truly compare the value of the two additional therapies offered to the patients at the university hospital because patient accrual was much slower than anticipated and many patients left the study too early for health reasons or death.
PubMed ID
10077715 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Opinions on psychiatric diseases of the citizens of Novosibirsk: results of a representative study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45838
Source
Psychiatr Prax. 2004 Mar;31(2):90-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Matthias C Angermeyer
Denis V Kenzine
Tsezar P Korolenko
Michael Beck
Herbert Matschinger
Author Affiliation
Klinik und Poliklinik für Psychiatrie, Universität Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. krausem@medizin.uni-leipzig.de
Source
Psychiatr Prax. 2004 Mar;31(2):90-5
Date
Mar-2004
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
English Abstract
Female
Germany
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Psychotherapy
Public Opinion
Sampling Studies
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - therapy
Schizophrenic Psychology
Siberia
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Citizens of Novosibirsk were questioned regarding their ideas about schizophrenia and depressive disorders, with one of the main concerns being a comparison with the ideas and attitudes of the German population. METHOD: In 2002, a representative survey (N = 745) was conducted among the adult population of Novosibirsk, using a fully structured interview that has been used in previous surveys in Germany. RESULTS: Symptoms of schizophrenia were more frequently identified as an indication of mental disorder than were depressive symptoms. Psychosocial stress and biological influences were similarly frequently seen as the cause of schizophrenia, with the former prevailing among the respondents in the case of depressive symptoms. Psychotherapy was most frequently recommended as a treatment measure, also for schizophrenia. Supposing that no treatment measures will be taken, respondents assessed the prognosis for both mental disorders negatively. Conversely, interviewees gave a positive treatment prognosis. DISCUSSION: Respondents from Germany and Novosibirsk showed similar beliefs, especially as regards the importance of biological influences and psychosocial stress and the assessment of psychotherapy as compared to psychopharmacology. However, German and Russian respondents also held differing views: a comparatively strong tendency of the Russian population to consider mental disorders as self-inflicted - an important finding that could shape future anti-stigma programs.
PubMed ID
14983397 View in PubMed
Less detail

12 records – page 1 of 2.