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243 records – page 1 of 25.

Integrating traditional healing practices into counseling and psychotherapy

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76432
Source
Thousand Oaks, Calif. : Sage Publications, c2005.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2005
Source
Thousand Oaks, Calif. : Sage Publications, c2005.
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Keywords
Counseling
Medicine
Psychotherapy
Spiritual healing
Spiritual Therapies
Abstract
Integrating Traditional Healing Practices Into Counseling and Psychotherapy critically examines ethnic minority cultural and traditional healing in relation to counseling and psychotherapy. Authors Roy Moodley and William West highlight the challenges and transformations within the field of multicultural counseling and psychotherapy by integrating current debates and issues of traditional healing with contemporary practice. The book uniquely presents a range of theoretical and empirical accounts of the dilemmas and issues facing students in training, professional counselors, psychotherapists, social workers, researchers, and others who use multicultural counseling or transcultural psychotherapy as part of their professional practice.
Notes
Consortium Library owns this title: WB880.I61 2005
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Underutilization of short-term group therapy: enigmatic or understandable?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155017
Source
Psychother Res. 2008 Mar;18(2):127-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
William E Piper
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. piper@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Psychother Res. 2008 Mar;18(2):127-38
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Curriculum
Education - standards
Humans
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mental Health Services - utilization
Psychology - education
Psychotherapy, Brief - statistics & numerical data
Psychotherapy, Group - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Given the evidence for the efficacy, applicability, and efficiency of the group therapies, they appear to be underutilized by clinicians, therapists, and researchers. This article considers reasons for their underutilization. The article also considers procedures for lessening patient and therapist tendencies to resist participating in the group therapies relative to individual therapies. Underutilization not only deprives patients of effective treatment for a wide range of problems but deprives therapists from experiencing fascinating and rewarding therapeutic processes. That has been the experience of the author after more than 35 years of conducting and studying group therapies.
PubMed ID
18815970 View in PubMed
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A description of a psychosocial/psychoeducational intervention for persons with recurrent suicide attempts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186407
Source
Crisis. 2002;23(4):156-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Yvonne Bergmans
Paul S Links
Author Affiliation
St. Michael's Hospital-University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. bergmansy@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Crisis. 2002;23(4):156-60
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Emotions
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Patient Education as Topic
Poverty
Psychotherapy - methods
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Recurrence
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
This paper gives a description of a psychosocial/psychoeducational group intervention for individuals with a history of recurrent suicide attempts. The intervention was conceived to reduce the risk of future suicidal behavior and to modify the client's psychopathology. Three features are felt to make the intervention unique from others described in the literature. First, the intervention is targeted at both men and women from an inner-city population who are often underhoused, underemployed, and undereducated. 24 of 48 clients (50%) lived alone, and 24 of those (92%) were living in subsidized housing; 33% lived in supportive housing, and one lived on the street at the time of assessment. 48% had a high-school education or less. Second, the principles of our approach stressed client validation and participation in the development and delivery of the therapy. Our frame of reference was to name ourselves as professionals with a set of skills and access to some kinds of information and clients as the experts on the experience in their lives. Third, the group content incorporated a multimodal approach to meet the varied needs of the clients. Future reports will discuss the empirical evaluation of this intervention; however, the development of specific, targeted approaches for unique individuals with recurrent suicide attempts is clearly needed.
PubMed ID
12617479 View in PubMed
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Patient personality and time-limited group psychotherapy for complicated grief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193089
Source
Int J Group Psychother. 2001 Oct;51(4):525-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
W E Piper
M. McCallum
A S Joyce
J S Rosie
J S Ogrodniczuk
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia.
Source
Int J Group Psychother. 2001 Oct;51(4):525-52
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjustment Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Analysis of Variance
Female
Grief
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Personality
Psychotherapy, Brief - methods
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Regression Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We used a randomized clinical trial to investigate the interaction of two patient personality characteristics (quality of object relations [QOR] and psychological mindedness [PM]) with two forms of time-limited, short-term group therapy (interpretive and supportive) for 139 psychiatric outpatients with complicated grief. Findings differed depending on the outcome variable (e.g., grief symptoms, general symptoms) and the statistical criterion (e.g., statistical significance, clinical significance, magnitude of effect). Patients in both therapies improved. For grief symptoms, a significant interaction effect was found for QOR. High-QOR patients improved more in interpretive therapy and low-QOR patients improved more in supportive therapy. A main effect was found for PM. High-PM patients improved more in both therapies. For general symptoms, clinical significance favored interpretive therapy over supportive therapy. Clinical implications concerning patient-treatment matching are discussed.
PubMed ID
11582899 View in PubMed
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Handbook of culture, therapy, and healing

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76028
Source
Mahwah, N.J. : L. Erlbaum Associates, 2004.
Date
2004
Source
Mahwah, N.J. : L. Erlbaum Associates, 2004.
Date
2004
Language
English
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Cross-cultural studies
Cultural psychiatry
Ethnopsychology
Healing
Psychiatry, transcultural
Psychotherapy
Abstract
The handbook discusses the ways psychosocial, biological, and cultural influences interact in the assessment of health and illness and the course of therapy.
Notes
UAA/APU Consortium Library General Collection: WM420 .H23121 2004
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Short-term day treatment programmes for patients with personality disorders. What is the optimal composition?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179587
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2004;58(3):243-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Sigmund Karterud
Øyvind Urnes
Author Affiliation
Department for Personality Psychiatry, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. sigmund.karterud@psykiatri.uio.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2004;58(3):243-9
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Combined Modality Therapy
Day Care - methods
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Services Research
Humans
Norway
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Psychoanalytic Therapy - methods
Psychotherapy, Brief - methods
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Research evidence indicates that approximately 10 h a week is a sufficient intensity for short-term day treatment programmes for patients with personality disorders. In this article, we discuss which therapeutic components should be included in such a programme. Relevant research and clinical literature are reviewed. The fit between the therapeutic components and the programme as a whole is discussed according to: 1) scientific evidence of the effectiveness of the therapeutic components, 2) a sound theoretical rationale, 3) evidence of user satisfaction among patients, 4) clinical experiences of staff, 5) comprehensiveness and consistency, and 6) available therapeutic skills and resources. We advocate an 11-h treatment programme comprising small group psychotherapy, art group therapy, large group psychotherapy, cognitive group therapy, problem-solving group therapy and optional adjuncts (cognitive behavioural group therapy) for patients with additional anxiety and eating disorders.
PubMed ID
15204213 View in PubMed
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Telephone technology in social work group treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162976
Source
Health Soc Work. 2007 May;32(2):139-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Bernie Mallon
Tracy Houtstra
Author Affiliation
Capital Health, Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. bmallon@cha.ab.ca
Source
Health Soc Work. 2007 May;32(2):139-41
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Humans
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Rehabilitation Centers
Rural Population
Social Work
Telephone
PubMed ID
17571647 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Jul 8;101(28-29):2364
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-8-2004
Author
Sten Thelander
Author Affiliation
Statens beredning för medicinsk utvärdering, Stockholm. Thelander@sbu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Jul 8;101(28-29):2364
Date
Jul-8-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Depression - therapy
Depressive Disorder - therapy
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Psychotherapy - methods - standards
Sweden
PubMed ID
15291320 View in PubMed
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[Evaluation of a group intervention using a feminist approach for women experiencing sexual abuse].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167092
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2006 Oct;30(10):1143-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Manon Bergeron
Martine Hébert
Author Affiliation
Département de sexologie, Université du Québec à Montréal, C.P. 8888 Succursale Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 3P8.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2006 Oct;30(10):1143-59
Date
Oct-2006
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Program Evaluation
Psychotherapy, Group
Quebec
Sex Offenses - psychology
Abstract
The present study evaluates a group intervention using a feminist approach for women experiencing sexual abuse in childhood or adulthood in order to measure changes associated with participation in a group intervention and verifies whether effects are maintained over time. The present study relates effects of the group intervention in terms of psychological distress, depression symptoms, post-traumatic stress symptoms and feelings of guilt and helplessness.
The sample consists of 26 women participating in a group intervention offered by sexual assault centers in Quebec (CALACS - Centre d'aide et de lutte contre les agressions à caractère sexuel).
Results show significant differences between pretest and post-test scores obtained one week following the end of the group intervention and gains are maintained at follow-up 3 months later.
The findings suggest that participation in the group intervention is associated with a reduction of psychological distress, depression symptoms, post-traumatic stress symptoms and feelings of guilt and helplessness in adult women reporting sexual abuse.
PubMed ID
17034852 View in PubMed
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Seeing future success: does imagery perspective influence achievement motivation?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160854
Source
Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2007 Oct;33(10):1392-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Noelia A Vasquez
Roger Buehler
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, Canada. noeliav@yorku.ca
Source
Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2007 Oct;33(10):1392-405
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adult
Canada
Female
Humans
Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Male
Motivation
Questionnaires
Students - psychology
Universities
Abstract
Imagining future success can sometimes enhance people's motivation to achieve it. This article examines a phenomenological aspect of positive mental imagery--the visual perspective adopted--that may moderate its motivational impact. The authors hypothesize that people feel more motivated to succeed on a future task when they visualize its successful completion from a third-person rather than a first-person perspective. Actions viewed from the third-person perspective are generally construed at a relatively high level of abstraction--in a manner that highlights their larger meaning and significance--which should heighten their motivational impact. Three studies in the domain of academic motivation support this reasoning. Students experience a greater increase in achievement motivation when they imagine their successful task completion from a third-rather than a first-person perspective. Moreover, mediational analyses reveal that third-person imagery boosts motivation by prompting students to construe their success abstractly and to perceive it as important.
PubMed ID
17933735 View in PubMed
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243 records – page 1 of 25.