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97 records – page 1 of 10.

Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):123-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Judith A DeJong
Stanley R Holder
Author Affiliation
Lanham, MD 20706, USA. judithdejong@comcast.net
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):123-51
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Education, Special - organization & administration
Educational Status
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education - psychology
Male
Models, Educational
Models, Psychological
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Program Evaluation
Psychosocial Deprivation
Residential Facilities - organization & administration
Schools - organization & administration
Social Problems - ethnology
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Therapeutic Community
United States
Abstract
This off-reservation boarding school serves over 600 students in grades 4-12; approximately 85% of the students reside in campus dormitories. After having documented significant improvement on a number of outcomes during a previous High Risk Youth Prevention demonstration grant, the site submitted a Therapeutic Residential Model proposal, requesting funding to continue successful elements developed under the demonstration grant and to expand mental health services. The site received Therapeutic Residential Model funding for school year 2001-2002. Once funds were received, the site chose to shift Therapeutic Residential Model funds to an intensive academic enhancement effort. While not in compliance with the Therapeutic Residential Model initiative and therefore not funded in subsequent years, this site created the opportunity to enhance the research design by providing a naturally occurring placebo condition at a site with extensive cross-sectional data baselines that addressed issues related to current federal educational policies.
PubMed ID
17602403 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accidental firearm injury in childhood--a predictor of social and medical outcome?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34092
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 1997 Sep;4(3):125-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
S. Ponzer
B. Bergman
B. Brismar
S E Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm Söder Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 1997 Sep;4(3):125-9
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Firearms - legislation & jurisprudence
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Psychosocial Deprivation
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds, Gunshot - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
This paper reports register data on a consecutive series of 141 children and teenagers hospitalized due to firearm injuries during a 21-year period in a community with restrictive firearm laws. Most of the injuries were minor and hospitalization was short. Shot by an air gun resulting in an eye injury was the most frequent reason for hospitalization. The patients hospitalized due to firearm injuries were compared with a control group composed of 141 individuals matched pair-wise for sex and age. The total morbidity during the follow-up period of on average 10 years was higher among patients compared with controls concerning both somatic diseases and injuries. All cases of severe psychopathology were found in the patient group. Criminality was higher among patients compared with controls and the former were younger at the time of the first crime compared with the latter. This study indicates that, irrespective of firearm laws, young people suffering from firearm injuries, even if the injury is classified as accidental, run a higher risk of becoming psychosocially disadvantaged and criminal as adults. This makes preventative measures highly necessary not only from a societal point of view, but also to avoid individual suffering in this high-risk group of youngsters.
PubMed ID
9426991 View in PubMed
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ADDH and conduct disorder: degree of diagnostic overlap and differences among correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229983
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1989 Nov;28(6):865-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1989
Author
P. Szatmari
M. Boyle
D R Offord
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1989 Nov;28(6):865-72
Date
Nov-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Developmental Disabilities - complications
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario
Psychosocial Deprivation
Abstract
The objective of this paper was to determine the degree of diagnostic overlap between attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity (ADDH) and conduct disorder (CD) and to see whether ADDH children show a different pattern of demographic, familial, and developmental correlates compared to CD children. The sample for this study consisted of 2,697 4- to 16-year-olds who participated in the Ontario Child Health Study. In terms of diagnostic overlap, ADDH and CD occurred together more often than by chance alone, particularly among girls. Pure groups of ADDH and CD children differed in a variety of ways. In general, ADDH children were younger and had experienced more developmental delays and less psychosocial disadvantage than the CD children. No differences were found with respect to associated impairments, a measure of severity. Children with both ADDH and CD (a mixed group) appeared to represent a true hybrid disorder rather than one diagnosis or the other. These findings support the validity of ADDH compared to CD, at least in terms of the pattern of correlates.
PubMed ID
2478519 View in PubMed
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Behavior problems in children adopted from psychosocially depriving institutions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146004
Source
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2010 May;38(4):459-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Emily C Merz
Robert B McCall
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA. ecm17@pitt.edu
Source
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2010 May;38(4):459-70
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adoption - psychology
Age Factors
Attention
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Child Development
Child, Institutionalized - psychology
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Internal-External Control
Male
Prevalence
Psychosocial Deprivation
Russia - epidemiology
Social Environment
Abstract
Behavior problems were investigated in 342 6- to 18-year-old children adopted from psychosocially depriving Russian institutions that provided adequate physical resources but not consistent, responsive caregiving. Results indicated that attention and externalizing problems were the most prevalent types of behavior problems in the sample as a whole. Behavior problem rates increased with age at adoption, such that children adopted at 18 months or older had higher rates than never-institutionalized children but younger-adopted children did not. There was a stronger association between age at adoption and behavior problems during adolescence than at younger ages at assessment. Children adopted from psychosocially depriving institutions had lower behavior problem rates than children adopted from severely depriving Romanian institutions in the 1990s. The implications of these results are that early psychosocial deprivation is associated with behavior problems, children exposed to prolonged early deprivation may be especially vulnerable to the developmental stresses of adolescence, and severe institutional deprivation is associated with a higher percentage of behavior problems after a shorter duration of exposure.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20084451 View in PubMed
Less detail

Better Beginnings, Better Futures: a community-based approach to primary prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215593
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1994;13(2):183-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
R D Peters
Author Affiliation
Better Futures Research Coordination Unit, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1994;13(2):183-8
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - prevention & control
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - prevention & control
Child, Preschool
Community Mental Health Services - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Developmental Disabilities - prevention & control
Early Intervention (Education) - economics
Female
Humans
Infant
Learning Disorders - prevention & control
Male
Ontario
Poverty
Psychosocial Deprivation
Risk factors
Abstract
Better Beginnings, Better Futures is a 25-year primary prevention policy research demonstration project. Its major purpose is to assess the extent to which community-based primary prevention programs can be effective in preventing emotional, behavioural, physical and cognitive problems in children from economically disadvantaged communities. The project grew out of a number of primary prevention initiatives introduced by the Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services (MCSS) since the late 1970s. Eleven sites, four of them located on native reserves, received funding in January, 1991 to establish programs in their communities. From the beginning, a qualitative, naturalistic research approach has been utilized to document and understand the ways in which the programs have developed in the various Better Beginnings communities.
PubMed ID
10151074 View in PubMed
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The Better Beginnings, Better Futures Project: a universal, comprehensive, community-based prevention approach for primary school children and their families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185963
Source
J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol. 2003 Jun;32(2):215-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Ray DeV Peters
Kelly Petrunka
Robert Arnold
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Queen's University. petrunka@post.queensu.ca
Source
J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol. 2003 Jun;32(2):215-27
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Child, Preschool
Combined Modality Therapy
Community Mental Health Services
Cross-Sectional Studies
Developmental Disabilities - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Poverty - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychosocial Deprivation
Remedial Teaching
Risk factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Evaluated a community-based, universal project designed to prevent emotional and behavioral problems and promote general development in young children, while also attempting to improve family and neighborhood characteristics, to link effectively with existing services, and to involve local residents in project development and implementation. The research involved 554 4-year-old children and their families living in 3 disadvantaged neighborhoods in Ontario, Canada. Longitudinal analyses of changes over the first 5 years of project operation indicated significant improvements in children's and parents' social-emotional functioning and physical health, parenting behaviors, and neighborhood and school characteristics. The findings from the Better Beginnings, Better Futures Project are encouraging and provide unique evidence for the extent to which a universal, comprehensive, community-based prevention strategy can promote the longer term development of young children, their families, and their neighborhoods.
PubMed ID
12679279 View in PubMed
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Care Need Index, a useful tool for the distribution of primary health care resources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31001
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003 May;57(5):347-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
K. Sundquist
M. Malmström
S-E Johansson
J. Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Family Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden. Kristina.Marinko@klinvet.ki.se
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003 May;57(5):347-52
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Resources - economics - supply & distribution
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Primary Health Care - economics
Psychosocial Deprivation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate how Care Need Index (CNI), a social deprivation index, may be used to allocate total primary health care resources. DESIGN: Cross sectional survey and register data. The CNI was based on sociodemographic factors: elderly persons living alone, children under age 5, unemployed people, people with low educational status, single parents, high mobility, and foreign born people. The CNI weights were calculated from the ratings of Swedish GPs of the impact of these factors on their workload. The CNI scale was transformed into a positive scale to avoid negative values. CNI weights were calculated for each decile of the study population. The risk of poor self reported health in the CNI deciles was estimated by means of a hierarchical logistic regression in the age range 25-74 (n=27 346). The MigMed database comprising all people living in Sweden was used to calculate the CNI for Stockholm. PARTICIPANTS: The Swedish population and the population in Stockholm County. MAIN RESULTS: The means of the CNI for deciles ranged from 61 (most affluent neighbourhoods) to 140 (most deprived) in Stockholm County. The ratio between the tenth and the first decile was 1.66. There was an approximately 150% increased risk of poor self reported health for people living in the most disadvantaged neighbourhoods (OR=2.50) compared with those living in the most affluent ones (OR=1). CNI ratios for the deciles corresponded approximately to the odds ratios of poor self reported health status. CONCLUSIONS: The CNI can be used to allocate total primary health care resources.
Notes
Comment In: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Jul;58(7):626; author reply 626-715194730
PubMed ID
12700218 View in PubMed
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The causal nature of the association between neighborhood deprivation and drug abuse: a prospective national Swedish co-relative control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267263
Source
Psychol Med. 2014 Sep;44(12):2537-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
K S Kendler
H. Ohlsson
K. Sundquist
J. Sundquist
Source
Psychol Med. 2014 Sep;44(12):2537-46
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Psychosocial Deprivation
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Risk for drug abuse (DA) is strongly associated with neighborhood social deprivation (SD). However, the causal nature of this relationship is unclear.
Three Swedish population-based cohorts were followed up over 5 years for incident registration of DA in medical, legal or pharmacy records. In each cohort, we examined the SD-DA association, controlling carefully for individual socio-economic status (SES) with multiple measures, in the entire sample and among pairs of first cousins, paternal and maternal half-siblings, full siblings and monozygotic (MZ) twins discordant for SD exposure. The number of informative relative pairs ranged from 6366 to 166,208.
In all cohorts, SD was prospectively related to risk for incident DA. In relative pairs discordant for SD exposure, the SD-DA association was similar to that seen in the entire population in cousins, half-siblings, full siblings and MZ twins. Eliminating subjects who were residentially unstable or had DA in the first two follow-up years did not alter this pattern. When divided by age, in the youngest groups, the SD-DA association was weaker in siblings than in the entire population.
Across three cohorts, controlling for individual SES and confounding familial factors, SD prospectively predicted risk for incident DA registration. These results support the hypothesis that the SD-DA association is in part causal and unlikely to result entirely from personal attributes, which both increase risk for DA and cause selection into high SD environments. At least part of the SD-DA association arises because exposure to SD causes an increased risk of DA.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25055172 View in PubMed
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Childhood adversities, adulthood life events and depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142673
Source
J Affect Disord. 2010 Dec;127(1-3):130-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Jyrki Korkeila
Jussi Vahtera
Hermann Nabi
Mika Kivimäki
Katariina Korkeila
Markku Sumanen
Karoliina Koskenvuo
Markku Koskenvuo
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Satakunta Hospital District, Finland. jyrki.korkeila@utu.fi
Source
J Affect Disord. 2010 Dec;127(1-3):130-8
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Family Conflict - psychology
Finland
Hospitalization
Humans
Life Change Events
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Psychosocial Deprivation
Risk factors
Statistics as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
The role of childhood adversities in predicting adulthood depression has been suggested to be complex and in need of additional comprehensive studies.
This investigation set out to examine whether increased exposure to life events (LEs) in adulthood mediates the association between childhood adversities and adulthood depression.
This study is based on a random health survey sample from the Finnish working-aged population (n=16,877) with a follow-up of up to 7 years. Depression was identified by Beck Depression Inventory, records of antidepressant prescriptions and hospitalization due to depression obtained from national health registers.
Childhood adversities were associated with an increased likelihood of experiencing a high number of LEs in adulthood and their perceived burdensomeness. The mean number of new LEs correlated significantly (P
PubMed ID
20569993 View in PubMed
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97 records – page 1 of 10.