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Finding and helping the deprived child.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251345
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1976 Feb 7;114(3):253-6, 261
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-7-1976
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1976 Feb 7;114(3):253-6, 261
Date
Feb-7-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Abuse
Child Advocacy
Child Development
Humans
Psychosocial Deprivation
PubMed ID
1032359 View in PubMed
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Psychosocial problems of deaf children and their families: a comparative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252034
Source
Am Ann Deaf. 1975 Aug;120(4):391-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1975

The Matthew effect: infant mortality in Canada and internationally.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198034
Source
Pediatrics. 2000 Jul;106(1):E5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
S. Dzakpasu
K S Joseph
M S Kramer
A C Allen
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Reproductive and Child Health, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Ottawa, Canada. susie_dzakpasu@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Pediatrics. 2000 Jul;106(1):E5
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Developed Countries
Health status
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Psychosocial Deprivation
World Health
Abstract
To examine whether the magnitude of improvement in the health status of a population over time is dependent on the previous health status of that population.
A study of infant mortality rates in Canada's 12 provinces and territories between the periods 1961-1965 and 1991-1995, and of infant mortality rates in 133 countries between 1960 and 1995.
Spearman's rank correlations, relative risks, and risk differences to measure the relationship between infant mortality in the 1960s and changes in infant mortality between the 1960s and 1990s.
In Canada, regional rankings based on infant mortality rates in 1961-1965 were strongly correlated (inversely) with rankings based on the percent change in infant mortality between 1961-1965 and 1991-1995 (correlation coefficient = -.85). In contrast, internationally, rankings based on infant mortality rates in 133 countries in 1960 were positively correlated with percent change between 1960 and 1995 (correlation coefficient =.56). Regional differences in infant mortality rates, measured using relative risks, declined in Canada (highest relative risk: 4.2, compared with Ontario in the 1960s; highest relative risk: 2.2, compared with Ontario in the 1990s) but increased globally (highest relative risk: 5.0, compared with industrialized countries in 1960; highest relative risk: 15.1, compared with industrialized countries in 1995).
Canadian regions with higher infant mortality rates in 1961-1965 achieved larger improvements compared with regions with initially lower infant mortality rates. The pattern observed within Canada is unlike the pattern observed internationally.
PubMed ID
10878174 View in PubMed
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Fostering empowering participation in prevention programs for disadvantaged children and families: lessons from ten demonstration sites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198337
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1999;18(1):105-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
G. Cameron
S. Cadell
Author Affiliation
Wilfrid Laurier University.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1999;18(1):105-21
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Humans
Parenting - psychology
Personality Development
Power (Psychology)
Program Evaluation
Psychosocial Deprivation
Social Support
Abstract
Empowering participation is relevant to many prevention programs. Yet many attempts at empowerment proceed without any clear understanding of the nature of empowerment or the practical requirements of an empowering process. This paper draws on the extensive program-development research for two Canadian prevention projects for disadvantaged children and families: the Parent Mutual Aid Organizations in Child Welfare Project and the Better Beginnings. Better Futures Prevention Project. The lessons learned in these projects about fostering empowering participation are summarized. The paper emphasizes the necessity to respect the demanding and complex requirements of successful empowering participation as well as the need to balance empowering participation with other priorities in prevention programs and projects.
PubMed ID
10847978 View in PubMed
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Erroneous, blurred, and mistaken--comments on the care need index.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179684
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Jul;58(7):626; author reply 626-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Bo Burström
Olle Lundberg
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Jul;58(7):626; author reply 626-7
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Care Rationing - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Psychosocial Deprivation
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Notes
Comment On: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003 May;57(5):347-5212700218
PubMed ID
15194730 View in PubMed
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The UPA (underprivileged area) score and mortality in Swedish municipalities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34073
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1997 Dec;15(4):203-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J. Sundquist
M. Bajekal
S E Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences Dalby/Lund, University of Lund, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1997 Dec;15(4):203-9
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Humans
Middle Aged
Mortality
Poverty
Psychosocial Deprivation
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To analyse the association between the Swedish underprivileged area (UPA) score and the standardized mortality ratio in Swedish municipalities. SETTING: All 284 municipalities in Sweden. DESIGN: The UPA-score was calculated for municipalities using the proportion of persons in the following groups: elderly persons living alone, children under five, persons in one-parent families, unskilled (SEI 1), unemployed, persons living in crowded households, those who have moved house in the last year, and persons of minority ethnic origin. After transformation (arc sin square root of) and standardization, each of the eight variables was weighted by the UK general practitioners' average weighting and added to give a composite index of socioeconomic deprivation--the UPA-score. The strength of the relationship between the UPA-score and premature mortality in Sweden was investigated by regression analysis using SMR, for people aged 20-64 years, 1989-93, as the dependent variable. RESULTS: The mean UPA-score (standard deviation) of the 284 municipalities was 0 (10.0) and the range -43 to 28. The mean SMR for all persons was 1 and the range 0.46 to 1.81. The association between UPA-score and SMR was statistically significant and the UPA-score explained 20% of the variation between municipalities in SMR. CONCLUSION: The range of social deprivation at the municipality level in Sweden, as measured by a composite index such as the UPA score, is wide. A two-fold variation at municipality level was also found in premature mortality. There was a significant association between high rates of mortality and social deprivation.
PubMed ID
9444725 View in PubMed
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Psychosocial factors and pregnancy outcome. Part two of a prospective longitudinal study of children in a new Stockholm suburb.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39006
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(2):79-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
G. Aurelius
A. Rådestad
I. Nylander
R. Zetterström
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(2):79-85
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Psychosocial Deprivation
Risk
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
In a current prospective sociomedical study of families in a Stockholm suburb, their home environments were investigated through interviews with the mothers on their first visit to a maternity health centre when pregnant, and through data obtained from various records. In a sample of 498 mothers, 109 women with psychosocial difficulties were compared with 255 women of the same age but who were not psychosocially deprived. While taking into account biomedical risk factors and parity, it appeared that there was little difference between the groups with regard to frequency of complications in pregnancy, delivery or in the newborn infant. The existence of supportive medical and social factors could be one explanation as to why anticipated differences between the groups were not observed.
PubMed ID
3602960 View in PubMed
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The pathophysiology of enuresis in children and young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36214
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1993 Jul;Spec No:5-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1993
Author
J P Nørgaard
J C Djurhuus
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology K, Aarhus University Hospital, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1993 Jul;Spec No:5-9
Date
Jul-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Argipressin - blood
Bladder, Neurogenic - complications
Child
Enuresis - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Humans
Psychosocial Deprivation
Sleep Disorders - complications
Abstract
Bedwetting is the most common urologic complaint among children. Wetting frequency at age 7 years varies from 5% to 15%. Treatment has been multimodal: drugs to depress bladder activity, increase urethral resistance, or modulate sleep; electrophysiologic treatment; and, recently, urine production modulation. All of these approaches reflect a lack of sufficient knowledge of the underlying pathophysiology of nocturnal enuresis. Over the last 13 years, enuresis studies at the Institute of Experimental Clinical Research, the University of Aarhus, Denmark, have focused on sleep disturbances, bladder reservoir function, urine output, and a combination of the three. Sleep studies indicate that: enuretic patients are normal sleepers; the voiding characteristics of an enuretic episode are similar to those of voluntary voiding during the day; and enuresis can take place during any stage of sleep, but generally occurs when the bladder is filled to the equivalent of maximal daytime functional capacity. Bladder reservoir capacity appears to be normal and bladder instability an unimportant factor in the pathology of nocturnal enuresis. However, enuretic patients have been shown to lack the normal nocturnal increase in antidiuretic hormone levels and had nocturnal urine production up to four times the volume of functional bladder capacity, which explains the need for bladder emptying. These findings open new avenues to the approach to treatment based on antidiuretic therapy.
PubMed ID
8039340 View in PubMed
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Improving reading and writing learning in underprivileged pluri-ethnic settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178930
Source
Br J Educ Psychol. 2004 Sep;74(Pt 3):437-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Françoise Armand
Pascale Lefrançois
Agnès Baron
Maria-Cécilia Gomez
Sylvie Nuckle
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Canada. Francoise.Armand@umontreal.ca
Source
Br J Educ Psychol. 2004 Sep;74(Pt 3):437-59
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention
Child
Cultural Diversity
Female
Humans
Language Development
Male
Multilingualism
Poverty - psychology
Psychosocial Deprivation
Quebec
Reading
Remedial Teaching
Writing
Abstract
Many studies carried out in first language contexts tend to demonstrate the positive effects of activity programmes aimed at (1) developing metaphonological abilities and (2) developing language skills through active story listening on learning to read and to spell by first-grade students.
This study seeks to extend previous findings by (a) including children, the majority of whom have French as a second language, who attend plurilingual schools and have not been included in previous studies, and (b) providing training based on three essential principles shared by the two kinds of programmes: integrating activities into realistic literacy practice contexts; encouraging active student participation through tasks which very often require problem solving; and tackling, one after the other, different kinds of operations or strategies.
Three groups of students were created out a pool of 202 children enrolled in nine first-grade classes in three underprivileged pluri-ethnic schools. The control group was composed of 46 students who received typical, first-grade methods for teaching reading and spelling. Experimental group 1 (DMPA), 91 students, received a training programme aimed at metaphonological abilities development. Experimental group 2 (DLS), 65 students, received a training intended to develop language skills through active story listening and production.
The students from the three groups were evaluated at the beginning (metaphonological task I, pre-reading task) and at the end (metaphonological task II, word recognition task, text comprehension task, word spelling task) of their first year in elementary school.
The programme for the development of metaphonological abilities enabled DMPA group students to obtain significantly higher scores than the control group on metaphonological task II and word recognition task. The DMPA group children also did significantly better than the control and the DLS groups on the word spelling task. However, the DLS group, who benefited from language skills development activities, also progressed in that they obtained significantly better results than the control group in the word recognition task. Moreover, at the end of grade one, there was no difference in the scores obtained by the groups on a comprehension questionnaire administered after the reading of the narrative text.
The word reading skills of first-grade children in underprivileged pluriethnic settings can be improved through activities aimed at metaphonological abilities development or language skills development by means of active story listening and production. On the other hand, in order to develop word spelling abilities, the development of metaphonological abilities was more effective. Lastly, further research should seek to improve understanding of the absence of effects of either learning programme on narrative text comprehension.
PubMed ID
15296549 View in PubMed
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"I met this wife of mine and things got onto a better track" turning points in risk development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190209
Source
J Adolesc. 2002 Feb;25(1):47-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Anna Rönkä
Sanna Oravala
Lea Pulkkinen
Author Affiliation
Family research unit, University of Jyväskylä, Finland. aronka@psyka.jyu.fi
Source
J Adolesc. 2002 Feb;25(1):47-63
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Child
Female
Finland
Human Development
Humans
Life Change Events
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Psychosocial Deprivation
Abstract
In this study, qualitative and quantitative approaches were combined to study the mechanisms involved in turning-point experiences among individuals who had been exposed to several risk factors in childhood and adolescence. The study was part of the Jyväskylä Longitudinal Study of Personality and Social Development, in which the lives of the participants (196 boys and 173 girls) have been followed from age 8 to age 36. The data concerning turning points was collected by semi-structured interview when the participants were 36 years old. Participants were classified into six developmental trajectories according to risk factors at ages 8-14 and problems of social functioning at age 36. The results showed that individuals with an unsuccessful childhood constructed their life courses less often in terms of education, work and social transitions compared to others. Those who were managing well in their lives at age 36, despite several risk factors in childhood (resilients) reported positive experiences and plenty of choice in relation to their turning points. Participants in the vulnerable subgroup, for their part, perceived turning points more negatively, and reported few opportunities for personal choice. Altogether, the results indicate that childhood experiences influence the content of turning points in adult life by shaping the direction of actual life paths. The quality of current life, however, has a greater bearing on the way turning points are evaluated.
PubMed ID
12009749 View in PubMed
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97 records – page 1 of 10.