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606 records – page 1 of 61.

[4 years after Chernobyl: medical repercussions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25355
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
D. Hubert
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Date
1990
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Abortion, Habitual - epidemiology
Blood Cell Count
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Decontamination - methods
Diarrhea - etiology
English Abstract
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Psychophysiologic Disorders - etiology
Pulmonary Fibrosis - etiology
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Skin - radiation effects
Triage
Ukraine
Abstract
The nuclear accident at Chernobyl accounted for an acute radiation syndrome in 237 persons on the site. Triage was the initial problem and was carried out according to clinical and biological criteria; evaluating the doses received was based on these criteria. Thirty one persons died and only 1 survived a dose higher than 6 Gy. Skin radiation burns which were due to inadequate decontamination, greatly worsened prognosis. The results of 13 bone marrow transplantations were disappointing, with only 2 survivors. Some time after the accident, these severely irradiated patients are mainly suffering from psychosomatic disorders, in the USSR, some areas have been significantly contaminated and several measures were taken to mitigate the impact on population: evacuating 135,000 persons, distributing prophylactic iodine, establishing standards and controls on foodstuff. Radiation phobia syndrome which developed in many persons, is the only sanitary effect noticed up to now. Finally, in Europe, there was only an increase in induced abortions and this was totally unwarranted. If we consider the risk of radiation induced cancer, an effect might not be demonstrated.
PubMed ID
2205311 View in PubMed
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The ability of general practitioners to detect mental disorders in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216423
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
M. Joukamaa
V. Lehtinen
H. Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Graduate
Family Practice - education
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Patient care team
Primary Health Care
Psychiatry - education
Psychophysiologic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Sampling Studies
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Abstract
The ability to detect mental disorders varies greatly among general practitioners in primary health care. The aim of this study was to determine the factors underlying the differences between general practitioners in the ability to recognize mental disorders in Finnish patient populations. The group studied consisted of 1000 randomly selected adult patients of primary care facilities in the city of Turku. The Symptom Checklist (SCL-25) was used as the reference method in the identification of psychiatric cases. According to the SCL-25, one fourth of the sample had mental disorders. A good recognition ability was associated with postgraduate psychiatric training and qualification as a specialist in general practice. Surprisingly, Balint group training, which is a method intended to improve the ability of general practitioners to manage their patients' mental health problems, was associated rather with poor than good detection ability.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Oct;92(4):3198848961
PubMed ID
7754788 View in PubMed
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Absolute versus relative ascertainment of pedophilia in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147471
Source
Sex Abuse. 2009 Dec;21(4):431-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Ray Blanchard
Michael E Kuban
Thomas Blak
James M Cantor
Philip E Klassen
Robert Dickey
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Ray_Blanchard@camh.net
Source
Sex Abuse. 2009 Dec;21(4):431-41
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Audiovisual Aids
Child
Choice Behavior
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Forensic Psychiatry - methods
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Ontario
Pedophilia - classification - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Penile Erection - physiology - psychology
Plethysmography - methods - standards
Psychological Tests
Psychometrics
Psychophysiology - methods - standards
Referral and Consultation
Tape Recording
Abstract
There are at least two different criteria for assessing pedophilia in men: absolute ascertainment (their sexual interest in children is intense) and relative ascertainment (their sexual interest in children is greater than their interest in adults). The American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd edition (DSM-III) used relative ascertainment in its diagnostic criteria for pedophilia; this was abandoned and replaced by absolute ascertainment in the DSM-III-R and all subsequent editions. The present study was conducted to demonstrate the continuing need for relative ascertainment, particularly in the laboratory assessment of pedophilia. A total of 402 heterosexual men were selected from a database of patients referred to a specialty clinic. These had undergone phallometric testing, a psychophysiological procedure in which their penile blood volume was monitored while they were presented with a standardized set of laboratory stimuli depicting male and female children, pubescents, and adults.The 130 men selected for the Teleiophilic Profile group responded substantially to prepubescent girls but even more to adult women; the 272 men selected for the Pedophilic Profile group responded weakly to prepubescent girls but even less to adult women. In terms of absolute magnitude, every patient in the Pedophilic Profile group had a lesser penile response to prepubescent girls than every patient in the Teleiophilic Profile group. Nevertheless, the Pedophilic Profile group had a significantly greater number of known sexual offenses against prepubescent girls, indicating that they contained a higher proportion of true pedophiles. These results dramatically demonstrate the utility-or perhaps necessity-of relative ascertainment in the laboratory assessment of erotic age-preference.
PubMed ID
19901237 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and mental disorder in the Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2301
Source
Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. 1980 Mar;25(2):173-181.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1980
Author
Seltzer, A.
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto
Source
Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. 1980 Mar;25(2):173-181.
Date
Mar-1980
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acculturation
Arctic Bay
Hysterical dissociation disorder
Paranoid personality disorder
Resolute Bay
Stress, mental
Adolescent
Adult
Aggression
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Anomie
Anxiety - epidemiology
Canada
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Interpersonal Relations
Inuits - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Psychophysiologic Disorders - epidemiology
Role
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Abstract
The phenomenon of acculturation stress is described with particular reference to the subsequent development of the transitional role conflict. The adolescent and young adult male Eskimo is especially susceptible to the anxiety generated by the process of acculturation and it is the interaction of this external stress with the bio-psychosocial characteristics of the individual within his ecological group, that may lead to an increased incidence of mental disorder. The clinical picture that develops will depend on the complex interaction of this psychosocial stressor and the level of ego development and its accompanying defence and coping strategies. We see how the development of manifest psychopathology in two young Inuit males was intimately associated with the stresses of acculturation acting upon personalities characterized by a low self-esteem and negative self-image, feelings of emasculation and a state of anomie. Coping and defensive strategies exhibited both similarities (drugs, alcohol, withdrawal, actin out) and differences (psychosis versus dissociation). The value of modified supportive therapy with continuity of care aimed at increasing self-esteem through sublimation, identification, reduction of dependency and encouragement of growth and autonomy is described, as are measures aimed at primary prevention.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2319.
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[A cognitive approach to overutilization of health services].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192488
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 24;98(43):4745-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-24-2001

[Activities of the somato-psychiatric departments within the structure of multi-profile hospitals].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103941
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1990;90(11):82-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
I Ia Gurovich
A B Shmukler
E D Bogomolova
A A Miasnikov
A S Rozenvasser
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1990;90(11):82-6
Date
1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Hospitals, General - organization & administration - trends
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Moscow
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - organization & administration - trends
Psychophysiologic Disorders - therapy
Russia
Abstract
Analysis of the work of the ++somato-psychiatric departments entering a multiple-discipline hospital has shown that admission to these departments of patients with concomitant mental and somatic pathologies may be viewed as an episode for such patients. The latter ones cannot be regarded as a permanent group to be treated at the above departments. The duration of the stay at hospital is largely determined by the character of somatic pathology and, in a considerable number of cases, represents a stage in the psychiatric inpatient treatment. The data indicate that the present-day bed capacities in such departments (0.65 per 10 thousand adult and adolescent population) are insufficient. It is highly advisable that the number of such departments be increased.
PubMed ID
1963989 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Adaptation to unit conditions is a guarantee in preserving the health of servicemen].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206282
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1997 Dec;318(12):14-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997

Adaption of recent Soviet Jewish immigrants and their children to Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230391
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Aug;34(6):512-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989
Author
T. Barankin
M M Konstantareas
F. de Bosset
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Aug;34(6):512-8
Date
Aug-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Adjustment Disorders - psychology
Adult
Child
Depressive Disorder - psychology
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Jews - psychology
Job Satisfaction
Middle Aged
Ontario
Psychophysiologic Disorders - psychology
Risk factors
USSR - ethnology
Abstract
This retrospective study examined the prevalence of depression and psychosomatic disorders among Soviet Jewish immigrants, and how such problems might have affected their children's adaptation. A 36-item English and Russian questionnaire was sent to 452 Soviet Jewish immigrants, requesting information on possible problems they or their children had had during the first three years after immigration. Ninety people responded, 78% of whom had children. Immigrants with depression and psychosomatic illness reported greater behaviour, academic, peer interaction, and child-parent difficulties in their children. Those who were married, were proficient in English, were professionals in the USSR and/or Canada and who had supportive friends, were more likely to adapt well. Because of the low response rate, the failure to validate the questionnaire, and the possible overrepresentation of professionals the findings are presented as preliminary pending further exploration. They are discussed for their relevance to the early identification of difficulties in immigrants and their children, and to the need for timely and informed intervention.
PubMed ID
2766204 View in PubMed
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Adaptive defense use and resting blood pressure in a population-based sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182601
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2003 Dec;55(6):531-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Michael Wm MacGregor
Karina W Davidson
Cheryl Barksdale
Sheila Black
David MacLean
Author Affiliation
University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2003 Dec;55(6):531-41
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood pressure
Defense Mechanisms
Female
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - psychology
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Psychophysiologic Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Q-Sort - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
There is an accumulating body of research related to the psychosomatic study of blood pressure. One variable that has received attention is defense use. We examined the relation between defense use and blood pressure in men and women of different ages.
A random sample of 667 participants was selected from a population-based study. Resting blood pressure was obtained, and each participant was rated for defense use by a trained observer using Defense-Q. An Adaptive Defense Profile (ADP) score was calculated for each participant, and this score was related to blood pressure.
Regression analyses revealed a significant main effect for the ADP score for both diastolic and systolic blood pressure. Those persons with higher ADP scores had lower diastolic and systolic blood pressure. As well, a significant Age x Sex x ADP score interaction was found for diastolic blood pressure. Older women with a less ADP score had higher diastolic blood pressure.
These findings suggest the continued investigation of defense use and blood pressure.
PubMed ID
14642984 View in PubMed
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606 records – page 1 of 61.