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327 records – page 1 of 33.

[47,XYY syndrome. Is diagnosis of significance?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33871
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Apr 20;118(10):1563-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-20-1998
Author
O B Kittang
P. Vesterhus
Author Affiliation
Barneavdelingen Vest-Agder sentralsykehus, Kristiansand.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Apr 20;118(10):1563-4
Date
Apr-20-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Height
Child
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Growth
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway
Patient Education
Psychomotor Performance
Retrospective Studies
XYY Karyotype - diagnosis - psychology
Abstract
Over a 10-year period, from 1984-1995, in the Norwegian county of Vest-Agder, five patients in a paediatric clinic were diagnosed as having chromosome constitution 47,XYY. There are 1,250 males born a year in Vest-Agder. The patients were identified with bias, and not in a routine or prospective screening programme. All patients except one, a child who was diagnosed by chance at the age of one week; were admitted because of moderate conduct disorders or problems at school and striking tallness of stature. The half-brother of one of the 47,XYY boys had Klinefelter's syndrome 47,XYY. We conclude that identification of 47,XYY syndrome and information about it were of significance and help in counselling the patients and their families.
PubMed ID
9615584 View in PubMed
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Acceptability and concurrent validity of measures to predict older driver involvement in motor vehicle crashes: an Emergency Department pilot case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161383
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2007 Sep;39(5):1056-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Frank J Molnar
Shawn C Marshall
Malcolm Man-Son-Hing
Keith G Wilson
Anna M Byszewski
Ian Stiell
Author Affiliation
CanDRIVE(1): a Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Institute of Aging funded New Emerging Team, Elisabeth-Bruyère Research Institute, 43 Bruyère Street, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 5C8. fmolnar@ottawahospital.on.ca
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2007 Sep;39(5):1056-63
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Automobile Driver Examination - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Disability Evaluation
Female
Head Movements
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Motor Skills
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Psychomotor Performance
Questionnaires
Reaction Time
Risk
Visual Fields
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Older drivers have one of the highest motor vehicle crash (MVC) rates per kilometer driven, largely due to the functional effects of the accumulation, and progression of age-associated medical conditions that eventually impact on fitness-to-drive. Consequently, physicians in many jurisdictions are legally mandated to report to licensing authorities patients who are judged to be medically at risk for MVCs. Unfortunately, physicians lack evidence-based tools to assess the fitness-to-drive of their older patients. This paper reports on a pilot study that examines the acceptability and association with MVC of components of a comprehensive clinical assessment battery.
To evaluate the acceptability to participants of components of a comprehensive assessment battery, and to explore potential predictors of MVC that can be employed in front-line clinical settings.
Case-control study of 10 older drivers presenting to a tertiary care hospital emergency department after involvement in an MVC and 20 age-matched controls.
The measures tested were generally found to be acceptable to participants. Positive associations (p
PubMed ID
17854579 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Age dependent typology of central nervous system activity in school children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36560
Source
Fiziol Zh. 1992 Nov-Dec;38(6):72-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
M P Grebniak
V V Mashynistov
Source
Fiziol Zh. 1992 Nov-Dec;38(6):72-7
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aging - physiology
Central Nervous System - physiology
Child
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Psychomotor Performance - physiology
Abstract
The age peculiarities of higher nervous activity (HNA) have been studied in 777 1st-10th form pupils at school of general education. Heterogeneity and nonuniformity of changes in indices are peculiar to age dynamics of HNA. The most intensive changes are stated in junior and senior forms.
PubMed ID
1340455 View in PubMed
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[Age dynamics of functional parameters in men in the Polar region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117718
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2013;26(4):647-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Iu G Solonin
E R Boiko
A L Markov
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2013;26(4):647-51
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone - analysis
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - physiology
Body mass index
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Heart Function Tests - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle strength
Population Dynamics
Postural Balance
Psychomotor Performance
Russia - epidemiology
Testosterone - analysis
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
In order to test the hypothesis about rapid involution of functional parameters in residents in the Polar region, the functional parameters in men of 20-69 years have been compared in cross-sectional study. There is a tendency to a steady decrease of height, strength indices, parameter of muscle working capacity, balancing of the body when standing on one leg, vital capacity, cardiac output, tolerance to hypoxemia, level of physical health, adrenocorticotropic hormone and testosterone levels and an increase of body mass index, index of coordination (impairment of motor coordination), time of visual-motor response, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, index of functional changes, insulin level. More pronounced decline of functions is observed in men after 50 years.
PubMed ID
24738254 View in PubMed
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[Age-related dynamics of the motion reaction in school children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88684
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2009;55(2):58-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Makarenko M V
Petrenko Iu O
Baida O H
Men'shykh O E
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2009;55(2):58-62
Date
2009
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aging - physiology
Central Nervous System - physiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Movement - physiology
Psychomotor Performance - physiology
Abstract
We studied functional state of the central nervous system of boys and girls aged from 7 to 17 years old. Peculiarities of age-dependent dynamics of functional level of the central nervous system, stability of the reactions, levels of functional possibilities were described. The age-dependent periods of strengthening and weakening of correlation between the indexes of motive reaction and the criteria of the functional state of central nervous system were determined.
PubMed ID
19526850 View in PubMed
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Age-related slowing of digit symbol substitution revisited: what do longitudinal age changes reflect?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185522
Source
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2003 May;58(3):P187-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Stuart W S MacDonald
David F Hultsch
Esther Strauss
Roger A Dixon
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. stuart.macdonald@neurotec.ki.se
Source
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2003 May;58(3):P187-94
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Attention
British Columbia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Paired-Associate Learning
Pattern Recognition, Visual
Psychometrics
Psychomotor Performance
Reaction Time
Wechsler Scales - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A previous investigation reported that cross-sectional age differences in Digit Symbol Substitution (DSS) test performance reflect declines in perceptual processing speed. Support for the tenability of the processing speed hypothesis requires examining whether longitudinal age-related change in DSS performance is largely mediated by changes in speed. The present study used data from the Victoria Longitudinal Study to examine patterns and predictors of longitudinal change in DSS for 512 older adults (M(age) = 68.37 years, SD = 7.43). On the basis of multilevel modeling, baseline DSS performance was poorer for older participants and men, with longitudinal declines more pronounced with increasing age and decreasing speed. In contrast to the present cross-sectional findings, statistical control of change trajectories in perceptual speed using the same data did not substantially attenuate age changes. These discrepancies suggest different sources of variance may underlie cross-sectional age differences and longitudinal age changes for DSS.
PubMed ID
12730311 View in PubMed
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Alcohol drinking and cognitive functions: findings from the Cardiovascular Risk Factors Aging and Dementia (CAIDE) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166066
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2007;23(3):140-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Tiia Ngandu
Eeva-Liisa Helkala
Hilkka Soininen
Bengt Winblad
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Aulikki Nissinen
Miia Kivipelto
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. tiia.ngandu@ki.se
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2007;23(3):140-9
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Causality
Cognition - drug effects
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Memory - drug effects
Middle Aged
Psychomotor Performance - drug effects
Abstract
Moderate alcohol drinking is suggested to be beneficial for cognitive functions, but the results of previous studies have varied greatly. Little is known about the effects of midlife alcohol drinking on the cognitive functions later in life.
Participants were derived from random, population-based samples studied in Eastern Finland in 1972, 1977, 1982, or 1987. A total of 1,341 participants were reexamined in 1998, after an average follow-up period of 21 years, at ages 65-79 years.
The participants who did not drink alcohol at midlife had a poorer performance in episodic memory, psychomotor speed, and executive function in late life as compared with infrequent and frequent drinkers, adjusted for sociodemographic and vascular factors. Also late-life nondrinkers had poorer psychomotor speed and executive function. These findings were evident especially among nonsmokers. Further, no interactions between apolipoprotein E4 and alcohol or sex and alcohol were found.
Alcohol drinking both at midlife and later is favorably related to the function in several cognitive domains, including episodic memory, psychomotor speed, and executive function, in late life. However, it is not clear whether the association is causal, what is the possible mechanism, and what would be a safe limit of drinking for the best cognitive function.
PubMed ID
17170526 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A method of evaluation of vocational training of students as a factor of development of their main functions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73857
Source
Gig Sanit. 1989 Jul;(7):32-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1989

327 records – page 1 of 33.