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Ability to perform activities of daily living is the main factor affecting quality of life in patients with dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51955
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2004 Sep 21;2:52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-21-2004
Author
Christian K Andersen
Kim U Wittrup-Jensen
Anette Lolk
Kjeld Andersen
Per Kragh-Sørensen
Author Affiliation
MUUSMANN Research & Consulting, Haderslevvej 36, 6000 Kolding, Denmark. journals@noos.fr
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2004 Sep 21;2:52
Date
Sep-21-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - physiopathology - psychology
Caregivers
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - classification - physiopathology - psychology
Denmark
Dependency (Psychology)
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Interviews
Male
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Quality of Life - psychology
Severity of Illness Index
Sickness Impact Profile
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Dementia is a chronic illness associated with a progressive loss of cognitive and intellectual abilities, such as memory, judgment and abstract thinking.The objective of this study was to assess the health utilities of patients with dementia in Europe and identify the key factors influencing their Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQol). METHODS: This study used cross-sectional data from the Odense study; a Danish cohort of patients aged 65-84 living in Odense, Denmark. A total of 244 patients with mild to severe dementia were interviewed together with a caregiver about their health status and activities of daily living (ADL). Alzheimer's disease was diagnosed according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria for probable dementia. Vascular dementia and other types of dementia were diagnosed according to the DSM-IIIR criteria. Severity of dementia was defined by score intervals on the Mini Mental State Examination score: mild (MMSE 20-30), moderate (MMSE 10-19), and severe (MMSE 0-9). Based on the ADL information, the patients' dependency level was defined as either dependent or independent. Questions from the Odense Study were mapped into each of the five dimensions of the EQ-5D in order to assess patients' HRQol. Danish EQ-5D social tariffs were used to value patients' HRQol.A regression analysis of EQ-5D values was conducted with backward selection on gender, age, severity, ADL level and setting in order to determine the main factor influencing HRQoL. RESULTS: The EQ-5D weight in patients independent upon others in ADL was 0.641 (95% CI: [0.612-0.669]), and in those dependent upon others was 0.343 (95% CI: [0.251-0.436]). CONCLUSION: Dependency upon others to perform ADL was the main factor affecting HRQoL.
PubMed ID
15383148 View in PubMed
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Absenteeism screening questionnaire (ASQ): a new tool for predicting long-term absenteeism among workers with low back pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132639
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2012 Mar;22(1):27-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Manon Truchon
Marie-Ève Schmouth
Denis Côté
Lise Fillion
Michel Rossignol
Marie-José Durand
Author Affiliation
Département des Relations Industrielles, Université Laval, Québec, Canada. manon.truchon@rlt.ulaval.ca
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2012 Mar;22(1):27-50
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons
Fear - psychology
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - psychology
Male
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Quebec
Questionnaires
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Work
Workplace
Abstract
Over the last decades, psychosocial factors were identified by many studies as significant predictive variables in the development of disability related to common low back disorders, which thus contributed to the development of biopsychosocial prevention interventions. Biopsychosocial interventions were supposed to be more effective than usual interventions in improving different outcomes. Unfortunately, most of these interventions show inconclusive results. The use of screening questionnaires was proposed as a solution to improve their efficacy. The aim of this study was to validate a new screening questionnaire to identify workers at risk of being absent from work for more than 182 cumulative days and who are more susceptible to benefit from prevention interventions.
Injured workers receiving income replacement benefits from the Quebec Compensation Board (n = 535) completed a 67-item questionnaire in the sub-acute stage of pain and provided information about work-related events 6 and 12 months later. Reliability and validity of the 67-item questionnaire were determined respectively by test-retest reliability and internal consistency analysis, as well as by construct validity analyses. The Cox regression model and the maximum likelihood method were used to fix a model allowing calculation of a probability of absence of more than 182 days. Criterion validity and discriminative capacity of this model were calculated.
Sub-sections from the 67-item questionnaire were moderately to highly correlated 2 weeks later (r = 0.52-0.80) and showed moderate to good internal consistency (0.70-0.94). Among the 67-item questionnaire, six sub-sections and variables (22 items) were predictive of long-term absence from work: fear-avoidance beliefs related to work, return to work expectations, annual family income before-taxes, last level of education attained, work schedule and work concerns. The area under the ROC curve was 73%.
The significant predictive variables of long-term absence from work were dominated by workplace conditions and individual perceptions about work. In association with individual psychosocial variables, these variables could contribute to identify potentially useful prevention interventions and to reduce the significant costs associated with LBP long-term absenteeism.
PubMed ID
21796374 View in PubMed
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Access to occupational networks and ethnic variation of depressive symptoms in young adults in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292368
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2017 10; 190:207-216
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2017
Author
Alexander Miething
Mikael Rostila
Jens Rydgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden; Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm University, Karolinska Institutet, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: alexander.miething@sociology.su.se.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2017 10; 190:207-216
Date
10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Depression - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology
Ethnic groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Iran - ethnology
Male
Prevalence
Psychometrics - instrumentation - methods
Social capital
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology - ethnology
Young Adult
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
Social capital research has recognized the relevance of occupational network contacts for individuals' life chances and status attainment, and found distinct associations dependent on ethnic background. A still fairly unexplored area is the health implications of occupational networks. The current approach thus seeks to study the relationship between access to occupational social capital and depressive symptoms in early adulthood, and to examine whether the associations differ between persons with native Swedish parents and those with parents born in Iran and the former Yugoslavia. The two-wave panel comprised 19- and 23-year-old Swedish citizens whose parents were born in either Sweden, Iran or the former Yugoslavia. The composition of respondents' occupational networks contacts was measured with a so-called position generator. Depressive symptoms were assessed with a two-item depression screener. A population-averaged model was used to estimate the associations between depressive symptoms and access to occupational contact networks. Similar levels of depressive symptoms in respondents with parents born in Sweden and Yugoslavia were contrasted by a notably higher prevalence of these conditions in those with an Iranian background. After socioeconomic conditions were adjusted for, regression analysis showed that the propensity for depressive symptoms in women with an Iranian background increased with a higher number of manual class contacts, and decreased for men and women with Iranian parents with a higher number of prestigious occupational connections. The respective associations in persons with native Swedish parents and parents from the former Yugoslavia are partly reversed. Access to occupational contact networks, but also perceived ethnic identity, explained a large portion of the ethnic variation in depression. Mainly the group with an Iranian background seems to benefit from prestigious occupational contacts. Among those with an Iranian background, social status concerns and expected marginalization in manual class occupations may have contributed to their propensity for depressive symptoms.
PubMed ID
28866474 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of the Danish version of the 'distress thermometer'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137474
Source
Psychooncology. 2012 Apr;21(4):436-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Pernille Envold Bidstrup
Birgitte Goldschmidt Mertz
Susanne Oksbjerg Dalton
Isabelle Deltour
Niels Kroman
Henrik Kehlet
Nina Rottmann
Rune Gärtner
Alex J Mitchell
Christoffer Johansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Cancer Research, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. pernille@cancer.dk
Source
Psychooncology. 2012 Apr;21(4):436-43
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - diagnosis
Breast Neoplasms - psychology
Denmark
Depression - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Questionnaires
Sensitivity and specificity
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis
Abstract
Short screening instruments have been suggested to improve the detection of psychological symptoms. We examined the accuracy of the Danish version of the 'Distress Thermometer'.
Between October 2008 and October 2009, 426 women with newly diagnosed primary breast cancer who were operated at the Breast Surgery Clinic of the Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, were eligible for this study. Of these, 357 participated (84%) and 333 completed a questionnaire. The distress thermometer was evaluated against the 'hospital anxiety and depression scale' (HADS). We also examined the women's wish for referral for psychological support.
A cut-off score of 6 vs 7 (low: =6, high: =7) on the distress thermometer was optimal for confirming distress, with a sensitivity of 42%, a specificity of 93%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 78% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 73%. A cut-off score of 2 vs 3 was optimal for screening, with a sensitivity of 99%, a specificity of 36%, a PPV of 47% and a NPV of 99%. Of those who were distressed using the cut-off score of 2 vs 3 on the distress thermometer, 17% (n = 41) wished to be referred for psychological support and 57% (n = 140) potentially wanted a later referral.
The distress thermometer performed satisfactorily relative to the HADS in detecting distress in our study. A screening procedure in which application of the distress thermometer is a first step could be useful for identifying persons in need of support.
PubMed ID
21280139 View in PubMed
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Adaption of pregnancy anxiety questionnaire-revised for all pregnant women regardless of parity: PRAQ-R2.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279025
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Feb;19(1):125-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
A C Huizink
M J Delforterie
N M Scheinin
M. Tolvanen
L. Karlsson
H. Karlsson
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Feb;19(1):125-32
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety - diagnosis - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Delivery, Obstetric - methods
Female
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Parity
Parturition
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - psychology
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires - standards
Abstract
The 10-item Pregnancy-Related Anxiety Questionnaire-Revised (PRAQ-R) is a widely used instrument to assess and identify pregnancy-specific anxiety in nulliparous women. It has good psychometric values and predictive validity for birth and childhood outcomes. Nonetheless, the PRAQ-R is not designed for use in parous women, as particularly one item of the questionnaire is not relevant for women who gave birth before. We tested the factorial and scalar invariance of a modified PRAQ-R2 across nulliparous and parous women with an adapted item to fit both groups of pregnant women. A longitudinal study among 1144 pregnant women (n = 608 nulliparous and n = 536 parous) with two repeated measures of the PRAQ-R2 was used to test for measurement invariance of the instrument. Results show metric and scalar invariance, indicating that the PRAQ-R2 measures similar constructs on the same scale for all pregnant women at two different times during pregnancy. We conclude that the PRAQ-R2 can be used, compared, or combined in a sample of nulliparous and parous women.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25971851 View in PubMed
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Additional evidence for the psychometric soundness of the Drive for Muscularity Attitudes Questionnaire (DMAQ).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172600
Source
J Soc Psychol. 2005 Oct;145(5):618-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Todd G Morrison
Rebecca L Harriman
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway, Republic of Ireland. Todd.Morrison@nuigalway.ie
Source
J Soc Psychol. 2005 Oct;145(5):618-20
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude
Body Image
Humans
Male
Muscles - physiology
Psychology, Social - instrumentation
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Questionnaires
Saskatchewan
Social Desirability
Students - psychology
PubMed ID
16201682 View in PubMed
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The Adult Reading History Questionnaire (ARHQ) in Icelandic: Psychometric Properties and Factor Structure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267316
Source
J Learn Disabil. 2014 Nov-Dec;47(6):532-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gyda Bjornsdottir
Jonas G Halldorsson
Stacy Steinberg
Ingunn Hansdottir
Kristleifur Kristjansson
Hreinn Stefansson
Kari Stefansson
Source
J Learn Disabil. 2014 Nov-Dec;47(6):532-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dyslexia - diagnosis
Humans
Iceland
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Questionnaires - standards
Reading
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
This article describes psychometric testing of an Icelandic adaptation of the Adult Reading History Questionnaire (ARHQ), designed to detect a history of reading difficulties indicative of dyslexia. Tested in a large and diverse sample of 2,187 adults, the Icelandic adaptation demonstrated internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = .92) and test-retest reliability (r = .93). Validity was established by comparing scores of adults who as children received ICD-10 diagnoses of specific reading disorder (F81.0; n = 419) to those of adults defined as nondyslexics (n = 679). ROC curve analysis resulted in an area under the curve of .92 (95% CI = .90, .93, p
PubMed ID
23456983 View in PubMed
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The alternative DSM-5 personality disorder traits criterion: A comparative examination of three self-report forms in a Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278993
Source
Personal Disord. 2016 Apr;7(2):124-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Bo Bach
Jessica L Maples-Keller
Sune Bo
Erik Simonsen
Source
Personal Disord. 2016 Apr;7(2):124-35
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Disorders - classification - epidemiology
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013a) offers an alternative model for Personality Disorders (PDs) in Section III, which consists in part of a pathological personality traits criterion measured with the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). The PID-5 selfreport instrument currently exists in the original 220-item form, a short 100-item form, and a brief 25-item form. For clinicians and researchers, the choice of a particular PID- 5 form depends on feasibility, but also reliability and validity. The goal of the present study was to examine the psychometric qualities of all 3 PID-5 forms, simultaneously, based on a Danish sample (N = 1376) of 451 psychiatric outpatients and 925 community-dwelling participants. Scale reliability and factorial validity were satisfactory across all 3 PID-5 forms. The correlational profiles of the short and brief PID-5 forms with clinician-rated PD dimensions were nearly identical with that of the original PID-5 (rICC = .99 and .95, respectively). All 3 forms discriminated appropriately between psychiatric patients and community-dwelling individuals. This supports that all 3 PID-5 forms can be used to reliably and validly assess PD traits and provides initial support for the use of the abbreviated PID-5 forms in a European population. However, only the original 220-item form and the short 100-item form capture all 25 trait facets, and the brief 25-item form may be ideally limited to preliminary screening or situations with substantial time restrictions.
PubMed ID
26642229 View in PubMed
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An instrument for measuring health-related quality of life in patients with Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT): development and validation of Deep Venous Thrombosis Quality of Life (DVTQOL) questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70975
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2004 Jun 23;2:30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-23-2004
Author
Ewa Hedner
Jonas Carlsson
Károly R Kulich
Lennart Stigendal
Anders Ingelgård
Ingela Wiklund
Author Affiliation
Experimental Medicine, AstraZeneca, R&D, SE-431 83 Mölndal, Sweden. Ewa.Hedner@astrazeneca.com
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2004 Jun 23;2:30
Date
Jun-23-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sickness Impact Profile
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Venous Thrombosis - drug therapy - physiopathology - psychology
Warfarin - therapeutic use
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few studies have evaluated patient-reported outcomes in connection with a primary event of deep venous thrombosis, partly due to a lack of disease-specific measures. The aim here was to develop a disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQL) measure, the deep venous thrombosis quality of life questionnaire (DVTQOL), for patients with recent exposition and treatment of proximal deep venous thrombosis. METHODS: A total of 121 consecutive outpatients (50 % males; mean age 61.2 +/- 14 years) treated with warfarin (Waran) for symptomatic proximal deep venous thrombosis were included in the study. Patients completed the SF-36, EQ-5D and the pilot version of the DVTQOL. RESULTS: Items having: high ceiling and floor effect, items with lower factor loadings than 0.50 and items loading in several factors were removed from the pilot version of DVTQOL. In addition, overlapping and redundant items identified by the Rasch analysis were excluded. The final DVTQOL questionnaire consists of 29 items composing six dimensions depicting problems with: emotional distress; symptoms (e.g. pain, swollen ankles, cramp, bruising); limitation in physical activity; hassle with coagulation monitoring; sleep disturbance; and dietary problems. The internal consistency reliability was high (alpha value ranged from 0.79 to 0.93). The relevant domains of the SF-36 and EQ-5D significantly correlated with DVTQOL, thereby confirming its construct validity. CONCLUSIONS: The DVTQOL is a short and user-friendly instrument with good reliability and validity. Its test-retest reliability and responsiveness to change in clinical trials, however, must be explored.
PubMed ID
15214965 View in PubMed
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An investigation into the empirical validity of the EQ-5D and SF-6D based on hypothetical preferences in a general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174379
Source
Health Econ. 2005 Nov;14(11):1169-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Stavros Petrou
Christine Hockley
Author Affiliation
National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford (Old Road Campus), Old Road, Headington, Oxford, England. stavros.petrou@npeu.ox.ac.uk
Source
Health Econ. 2005 Nov;14(11):1169-89
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
An important consideration for studies that derive utility scores using multi-attribute utility measures is the psychometric integrity of the measurement instrument. Of particular importance is the requirement to establish the empirical validity of multi-attribute utility measures; that is, whether they generate utility scores that, in practice, reflect people's preferences. We compared the empirical validity of EQ-5D versus SF-6D utility scores based on hypothetical preferences in a large, representative sample of the English population.
Adult participants in the 1996 Health Survey for England (n=16 443) formed the basis of the investigation. The subjects were asked to complete the EQ-5D and SF-36 measures. Their responses were converted into utility scores using the York A1 tariff set and the SF-6D utility algorithm, respectively. One-way analysis of variance was used to test the hypothetically constructed preference rule that each set of utility scores differs significantly by self-reported health status (categorised as very good, good, fair, bad or very bad). The degree to which EQ-5D and SF-6D utility scores reflect alternative configurations of self-reported health status; illness, disability or infirmity, and medication use was tested using the relative efficiency statistic and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves.
The mean utility score for the EQ-5D was 0.845 (95% CI: 0.842, 0.849), whilst the mean utility score for the SF-6D was 0.799 (95% CI: 0.797, 0.802), representing a mean difference in utility score of 0.046 (95% CI: 0.044, 0.049; p
PubMed ID
15942981 View in PubMed
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187 records – page 1 of 19.